Sleep Apnea Losing Weight


If I lose weight, can I reduce the severity of

If I lose weight, can I reduce the severity of my obstructive sleep apnea? Topics Sleep Sleep Disorders Obstructive Sleep Apnea If I lose weight, can I reduce the severity of my obstructive sleep apnea? Weight loss can absolutely influence the severity of sleep apnea in a positive way. Scott Leibowitz about the impact that being overweight has on sleep apnea. If you lose weight, you can not only reduce the severity of you obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), you may eliminate it altogether. You can be quite skinny and have severe OSA. But obesity is the number one risk factor for OSA, and the majority of patients with OSA, about 70%, are too fat. In one large study a weight decrease of 10% eliminated mild sleep apnea. More substantial weight loss can significantly improve patients with moderate or even severe OSA. In one large study only 11% of overweight patients with OSA were successfully treated by weight loss alone, and by the end of three years only 3% maintained the improvement. more...



Sleep Apnea and Weight Gain - Weight Loss Center

Sleep Apnea and Weight Gain. If so you may be experiencing sleep apnea. What is Sleep Apnea? Signs and Symptoms of Sleep Apnea. Signs and symptoms of sleep apnea may include: Effects of Sleep Apnea on the Body. This is likely the reason that weight gain is one of the symptoms of sleep apnea and also explains why sleep apnea has been independently linked to insulin resistance . For more information go to the topic Sleep and Weight Loss . Causes and Risk Factors for Obstructive Sleep Apnea. How Body Weight is Related to Sleep Apnea. Health Conditions Associated with Sleep Apnea. Heart function is reduced in direct proportion to the severity of sleep apnea. Sleep Apnea Treatment. more...



Sleep apnea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There is also evidence that the risk of diabetes among those with moderate or severe sleep apnea is higher. Sleep apnea may be diagnosed by the evaluation of symptoms, risk factors and observation, (e.g. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common category of sleep-disordered breathing. Individuals with low muscle tone and soft tissue around the airway (e.g., because of obesity) and structural features that give rise to a narrowed airway are at high risk for obstructive sleep apnea. Men are more likely to suffer sleep apnea than women and children are, though it is not uncommon in the last two population groups. To describe the full range of breathing problems during sleep in which not enough air reaches the lungs ( hypopnea and apnea). In central sleep apnea, the effects of sleep alone can remove the brain's mandate for the body to breathe. Mixed apnea and complex sleep apnea[ edit ] The condition is generally detected when obstructive sleep apnea is treated with CPAP and central sleep apnea emerges. The Pillar Procedure is a minimally invasive treatment for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. The Stanford Center for Excellence in Sleep Disorders Medicine achieved a 95% cure rate in people with sleep apnea by surgery. A person with sleep apnea undergoing any medical treatment must make sure his or her doctor and anesthetist are informed about the sleep apnea. Alternative and emergency procedures may be necessary to maintain the airway of sleep apnea patients. The management of obstructive sleep apnea was improved with the introduction of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), first described in 1981 by Colin Sullivan and associates in Sydney , Australia . more...



Is Your Sleep Messing with Your Waistline? - Men's Health

Is Your Sleep Messing with Your Waistline? Or is your waistline messing with your sleep? Me, I chose door #3: I turned off the TV and went for a full night's sleep. And the fewer things you have to stimulate your brain—like lights, noise, or non-procreative sex scenes on Game of Thrones—the better you'll sleep. Sleep apnea can rob you of both quantity and quality. "Poor sleep definitely increases the risk of obesity," says Spencer Nadolsky, D. "And obesity increases the risk of sleep apnea. You can't get treatment for sleep apnea without a diagnosis, and you can't get a diagnosis without undergoing a supervised sleep study. Receive The Latest From Men's Health and Your Free Guide. Once again, a bedmate or roommate is the best judge, but you can answer "yes" if you sometimes wake up gasping for breath. But it's correlated with poor sleep, and it's the one risk factor you can measure without help. If you are diagnosed with sleep apnea, chances are good that your doctor will recommend losing weight, Nadolsky says. And how do you do that? S., is an award-winning journalist and the coauthor (with Alwyn Cosgrove) of The New Rules of Lifting Supercharged . more...



Sleep Apnea? Lose Weight, ACP Urges - Medpage Today

The first line of defense against obstructive sleep apnea should be weight loss, according to new guidelines from the American College of Physicians. Note that the guidelines recommend CPAP treatment as initial therapy for patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea, and mandibular advancement devices as an alternative therapy for patients who prefer mandibular advancement devices or for those with adverse effects associated with CPAP. On the other hand, there is insufficient evidence to say surgery has any benefit and, given its risks, it "should not be used as initial treatment," according to the guidelines published in the Oct. Obstructive sleep apnea is an increasing issue, "probably because of escalating obesity rates," the guidelines noted, so that more and more people are likely to seek treatment. The first recommendation of the guideline committee was that all overweight and obese patients who have obstructive sleep apnea should be encouraged to lose weight. The investigators concluded that the evidence showed that "some intensive weight-loss programs may effectively reduce signs and symptoms of (obstructive sleep apnea) in obese patients with or without diabetes." The evidence shows that CPAP reduces daytime sleepiness, cuts the AHI and arousal index scores, and increases quality of life, although it has not been shown to improve the latter, they reported. There was insufficient evidence to say anything about the effect of CPAP on cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes, the guidelines committee found. The committee noted that evidence shows the devices are better than no treatment in improving AHI scores, arousal index scores, and minimum oxygen saturation. The systematic evidence review was sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. more...



Sleep Apnea and Weight Loss 2 - Ask the Expert

Home > > Ask The Expert > > Losing Weight with Sleep Apnea. What weight loss treatment plan and advice do you recommend to your patients with sleep apnea? Is it harder for someone with sleep apnea to lose weight? There was speculation many years ago that sleep deprivation slows your metabolism, which, in dramatic cases, slows to the point where you couldn't lose weight. I tell my patients, that being treated for obstructive sleep apnea with CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure, the most common treatment for OSA) is not weight loss equipment. But our hope is that if we can control your sleep apnea you will get more consolidated sleep so you won't have these fluctuations in hormone levels. You will rest better, you will be more motivated to proceed with an exercise program, and you will have more energy to proceed with a weight loss program. more...



6 Ways Sleep Can Help You Lose Weight - Women's Health

In fact, an analysis by researchers at Columbia University found that people who sleep less than seven hours per night are heavier, gain more weight over time, and have a harder time losing weight! The longer you’re awake, the more likely you are to consume calories you don’t need, which can cause you to gain up to two pounds a week, according to researchers at the University of Pennsylvania. To 8 a.m.) gained more weight than their well-rested counterparts (sleeping from 11 p.m. It Helps You Burn More Calories. Not only do you have more energy to take on the day after a good night’s sleep, but your body also torches calories, even when you’re not working out. A study from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that normal sleepers' resting energy expenditure—the amount of calories burned when you’re not moving—was five percent higher than their tired counterparts. They also burned 20 percent more calories after a meal versus sleep-deprived people. Even if you eat the exact same diet as your friend, if you’re not getting the sleep your body needs, you won’t drop as much fat as them. A recent study from the University of Chicago compared the weight-loss results from sleeping eight and a half hours per night versus only five and a half hours per night. While both groups lost about six and a half pounds, more than half of that weight was fat for well-rested people, compared to only a quarter for tired participants. In a study published in the journal Obesity, sleep-deprived men bought nearly 1,300 calories in food more than well-rested men. What's more, another study from Columbia University also found brain activity differences in sleepy people's response to food. Importantly, unhealthy food activates this region more than healthy food, which means that skipping out on sleep could make it harder to skip out on a trip to the vending machine. more...



Weight loss, breathing devices still best for treating

New guidelines from the American College of Physicians (ACP) emphasize lifestyle modifications—especially weight loss—for treating obstructive sleep apnea. The ACP’s first recommendation centers on weight loss for people who are overweight and obese. The link between excess weight and sleep apnea is well established. People who are overweight have extra tissue in the back of their throat, which can fall down over the airway and block the flow of air into the lungs while they sleep. “If we can get people to lose weight, it would make both sleep apnea and other health problems [such as heart disease] go away,” says Dr. This is typically the first-line treatment for people with sleep apnea, because weight loss can be so hard to achieve. CPAP is a mask or device that fits over the nose and mouth. A continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine prevents sleep apnea by blowing air into a mask that covers the nose and mouth. CPAP and oral appliances work well, but they’re not cures for sleep apnea. Because the breathing pauses happen during sleep, most people with apnea have no idea they’ve got it. “It’s important to get an objective measure like a sleep study, because the treatment you select will depend on how severe the sleep apnea is,” says Dr. He recommends choosing a doctor who is experienced in treating sleep apnea—someone who can help you find the treatment you’re most likely to stick with, and teach you how to use it correctly. more...



Losing Weight Because of CPAP? - Psychology Today

Losing Weight Because of CPAP? Connecting the dots between CPAP and weight gain/loss. "I'm looking for a connection between weight LOSS and sleep apnea or my CPAP machine. People’s weight responds differently once they start using CPAP regularly to treat their obstructive sleep apnea. more...



The Link Between Snoring and Weight - Weight Watchers

The Link Between Snoring and Weight. But the truth is, snoring isn’t funny, and it could be a sign of a serious sleep disorder. And if someone is snoring, it’s not likely they are getting the full benefits of sleep. “So the sound of someone snoring is really the sound of someone who is having a hard time breathing,” she says. “The most frequent myth about snoring is that it is harmless or even humorous. “Snoring can be a damper on marital intimacy if the partners are sleeping in separate quarters.” Being overweight can exacerbate snoring, because one of the causes of the turbulence in the throat is the narrowing of the airway due to neck fat. That loud snorting sound that bellows from the mouth of a snoring person is the tissue in the airway literally rattling, and it’s not confined to just guys. Walsleben says snoring can result in heightened adrenaline levels in the body. In addition to surgery, dental appliances, decongestants and other medical treatments for snoring, Walsleben says people can take their own actions to reduce the frequency of their snoring: more...



Sleep Apnea : Symptoms, Treatments, Causes, and Cures

Sleep Apnea. Sleep apnea signs and symptoms. Signs and symptoms of sleep apnea in children. Do you have sleep apnea? CPAP for sleep apnea. Dental devices and surgery for sleep apnea. Sleep apnea signs, symptoms, and causes. Sleep Apnea – Overview of the basics of sleep apnea, causes, symptoms, and treatment. Being Evaluated for Sleep Apnea – Learn about the diagnosis and treatment of sleep apnea. Treatment Options for Obstructive Sleep Apnea – Reviews the treatment options for obstructive sleep Apnea. more...



How snoring can cause weight gain

As a sleep specialist, my patients often ask about the relationship between snoring and weight gain. The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) has demonstrated that obesity is a risk factor for snoring and sleep apnea and that snoring may cause weight gain or the inability to lose weight . The relationship between snoring and weight gain is linked to alterations in our metabolism, increased appetite and decreased energy expenditure. In other words, snoring and fatigue from interrupted sleep make us hungrier and less active- and both lead to weight gain. If you are not sleeping because of your partner’s snoring, the resulting fatigue may be the reason you’ve become inactive and packed on weight. Snoring and weight gain should not be ignored as the combination may cause life-threatening health conditions. Be aware that snoring could also be a sign of sleep apnea, so consult a sleep specialist for the treatment option that is best suited to you. Excess weight and sleep apnea. The end result is snoring and sleep apnea. It has been shown that men with a collar size larger than 17 inches (16 inches for women) are more prone to snoring and sleep apnea. Q&A: Hve questions about sleep disorders, snoring and sleep apnea? more...



Lose Weight To Sleep Better - The Huffington Post

That's because the lack of sleep causes the hormones that control your appetite to go haywire. On the flipside, getting the sleep you need keeps these appetite hormones in check and helps prevent you from packing on the pounds. Sleep and Exercise Plan to Enhance Weight Loss. That losing weight could help you sleep more soundly (a healthy catch-22 of sorts)? And it didn't matter if the fat loss came from the subjects' diet alone or the diet and exercise combo. Slimming down can help you get the sleep you've always dreamt about. more...



Weight Loss May Improve Sleep Apnea

Weight Loss May Improve Sleep Apnea. Study Shows Weight Loss Has Long-Term Benefits in Treating Sleep Apnea. June 1, 2011 - Weight loss is an effective long-term treatment for patients with sleep apnea who are overweight or obese, a study shows. In 2009, researchers from Sweden's Karolinska Institute showed that overweight and obese men who lost weight on a severely calorie restricted diet over nine weeks had big improvements in their sleep apnea symptoms . Weight Loss and Sleep Apnea. Patients with the most severe sleep apnea saw the biggest improvements in symptoms and those who lost the most weight improved the most. more...



Sleep Disorders and Weight Gain - What To Do

Sleep Disorders and Weight Gain | What To Do. A growing body of research is finding a link between sleep disorders and weight gain. Insufficient sleep can lead to weight gain, which can lead to a serious problem called sleep apnea, which produces more sleep deprivation and more packing on of the pounds. Sleep disorders can lead to weight gain, or make losing weight a real challenge. Sleep Disorders and Weight Gain. More and more research is finding that sleep disorders and weight gain go hand-in-hand. Concluded the authors: “Sleep problems likely contribute to weight gain. To prevent major weight gain and obesity, sleep problems need to be taken into account.” And weight gain, unfortunately, can lead to another sleep disorder, called sleep apnea, which robs us of even more sleep, which can lead to even more weight gain.  Insulin promotes the release of leptin, the “stop eating” hormone, so when we’re sleep deprived and our cells are rejecting insulin, our bodies make less leptin, which means more eating, and more weight gain. Scheib and the team of physicians at Pritikin, is that getting back to a good night’s sleep can help calm hormonal disturbances. Sleep and Your Heart. “Sleep apnea is a leading cause of right heart failure and sudden death in the U. more...



Weight Loss Helps Sleep Apnea

Weight Loss Helps Sleep Apnea. A new study confirms that weight loss can significantly improve and potentially eliminate obstructive sleep apnea symptoms in obese people. Obstructive sleep apnea is most common in overweight and obese people. In the study, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, researchers looked at the effect of weight loss on obstructive sleep apnea in 264 obese adults with type 2 diabetes . Those in the weight loss group were three times as likely to experience a remission of their obstructive sleep apnea symptoms (13.6% vs. In addition, the study showed that people in the second group experienced a worsening of their sleep apnea symptoms. Foster says these results show that weight loss can significantly reduce the symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea and without treatment the sleep disorder can progress rapidly. more...



Can losing weight cure sleep apnea

Can losing weight cure sleep apnea? It has been said that snoring is a symptom of sleep apnea and that losing weight can cure snoring in some people. Given those facts, is it possible to cure sleep apnea by losing weight? Sleep Apnea in Springfield Treated by a Pulmonologist Specialist. Most sleep apnea is caused by mechanical blockage of the throat and upper trachea, caused by soft excess tissue around the neck and throat, and most of this can be remedied by removal, especially by losing weight. Specialists in sleep disorders and snoring problems. Disclosure:  I lost weight and find that I am no longer troubled by sleep apnea. Michael Morgenstern, MD , Sleep Medicine Expert, Physician, American Sleep Apnea Society. Obstructive sleep apnea can be caused by the underlying anatomy of the upper airway as well as accumulated fat around the upper airway. Therefore, losing weight can help. Losing weight has certainly helped some people with this. Sleep Apnea . Losing weight can sometimes impact the severity of sleep apnea. However; I have worked with, and know personally, MANY patients and people who are at a very healthy weight and BMI, yet still have obstructive sleep apnea. more...



A Little Weight Loss May Ease Sleep Apnea

A Little Weight Loss May Ease Sleep Apnea. Finnish researchers said losing as little as 5 percent of body weight seems to lead to significant improvement in the condition - in which breathing pauses frequently while people are asleep, resulting in disrupted sleep and daytime fatigue. "Being overweight is considered the most important risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea," said lead researcher Dr. Being moderately overweight increases the risk for obstructive sleep apnea by 10 times, Tuomilehto said. "It has been estimated that around 70 percent of all patients with obstructive sleep apnea are obese," he said. Based on this and other studies, Tuomilehto said, a weight-reduction program with lifestyle counseling should be a part of the routine treatment for all obstructive sleep apnea patients who are obese. For the study, his team randomly assigned 57 moderately obese people with mild sleep apnea to a yearlong supervised program of diet and exercise designed to get them to lose weight. "Obstructive sleep apnea is a highly prevalent disease and untreated it is a major burden for our health care systems," he said. "Unfortunately, 80 percent to 90 percent of those with obstructive sleep apnea are undiagnosed and do not know or even suspect that they have it." 11 issue of the journal Sleep Medicine. Y., said obesity is linked to sleep apnea because fatty tissue accumulates around the neck and narrows the airway, making it more susceptible to obstruction during sleep. In addition, sleep apnea may contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes. "While a weight-loss program is appropriate for overweight sleep apnea patients, it should not be relied upon as the sole therapy for those with moderate to severe sleep apnea who are at risk for cardiovascular consequences and for patients with any severity of sleep apnea who suffer from daytime sleepiness that adversely affects daytime function," he said. Although the new study showed a connection between weight loss and improved sleep apnea symptoms, it did not prove a cause-and-effect link. For more about sleep apnea, visit the U. more...



What Is Sleep Apnea? - NHLBI, NIH

Share this page from the NHLBI on Blogger. Share this page from the NHLBI on Buzz. Share this page from the NHLBI on Delicious. Share this page from the NHLBI on Digg. Share this page from the NHLBI on Facebook. Share this page from the NHLBI on Linked In. Share this page from the NHLBI on Messenger. Share this page from the NHLBI on My Space. Share this page from the NHLBI on Reddit. Share this page from the NHLBI on Stumble. Share this page from the NHLBI on Tumblr. Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. The most common type of sleep apnea is obstructive sleep apnea. more...



How Weight Loss May Improve Your Sleep and Reduce Apnea

You probably recognize if you need to lose some weight, but how might weight loss improve your sleep? And how much weight do you need to lose? From snoring to sleep apnea , weight loss can have significant benefits and lead to better rest. Discover how weight loss may improve your sleep and reduce your risk of sleep apnea. Excessive Weight Can Ruin Your Sleep. For those who are overweight or obese, this excessive weight can be ruining your sleep and your health. Can Weight Loss Improve Snoring? Research seems to suggest that weight loss can, indeed, improve snoring. Nevertheless, weight loss may be a reasonable goal due to the overall benefits it may have in your health. Medication and Weight Loss Supplements. In some cases, the use of medications or weight loss supplements may be a useful addition when diet and exercise are not enough. Surgery is not without risks, and it is often required to demonstrate some motivation with weight loss prior to the procedure. Weight loss may reduce the degree of snoring and your risk of sleep apnea. If you have persistent sleep apnea, the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) may be an important part of your health and weight loss goals. There is also considerable evidence that getting adequate sleep may improve metabolism and reduce unwanted weight gain. more...



Losing Weight to Treat Sleep Apnea - TMJ Therapy and Sleep

According to many studies, overweight individuals are more likely to suffer from many different health conditions including diabetes, hypertension, and sleep apnea . They are more likely to suffer from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) because of the excess deposits of fat that can grow within the neck and throat region. With the help of sleep apnea technology, patients should work towards losing weight as another way to treat their sleep apnea. When treating sleep apnea and obesity at the same time, successful treatment of both conditions is much more likely. If you’re overweight and you snore or have been diagnosed with sleep apnea, contact Dr. more...



Sleep Apnea Weight Loss Plan - Sleep Apnea Guide

If you have sleep apnea and you are overweight, sleep apnea weight loss plan will definitely improve your sleep disorder and your overall health. How to Lose Weight When You Have Sleep Apnea? The CPAP therapy improves your quality of sleep and your energy levels to the point that you can stick to exercise and diet regime that will result in effective weight loss. For the new Sleep Apnea Weight Loss Plan you want to consume 3 small meals and two or three snaks per day, rather than eating 2 large meals. What to Eat When You Have Sleep Apnea and Weight Problems? There are types of food that you should avoid if you start the Sleep Apnea Weight Loss Plan, and eat only the healthy options. To improve your eating habits and lose weight, here are some quick fix menu solutions that will help you with sleep apnea weight loss: For our Sleep Apnea Weight Loss Plan you want to eat foods that are prepared by either: The strategy for losing weight, even if you have sleep apnea, is simple and widely known: you just need to consume fewer calories than you consume. The more options you have, the more tempted you are to make a bad and unnecessary choice. Because you have sleep apnea and want to lose weight, you want to carefully read the labels from each food package. more...



Losing Weight with CPAP for Sleep Apnea - Sleep Education

Losing Weight with CPAP for Sleep Apnea. Excess body weight is a major risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea . Treating sleep apnea with CPAP helps some people bring their weight under control. Then she was diagnosed with sleep apnea and started using CPAP. Sixteen of the 22 contestants were diagnosed with sleep apnea. The study involved 228 adults with sleep apnea. more...



Obstructive sleep apnoea - NHS Choices

Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a condition where the walls of the throat relax and narrow during sleep, interrupting normal breathing. As many people with OSA experience episodes of both apnoea and hypopnoea, doctors sometimes refer to the condition as obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome, or OSAHS. People with OSA may experience repeated episodes of apnoea and hypopnoea throughout the night. Read more about the  symptoms of OSA . Read more about diagnosing OSA . Read more about the causes of OSA . In the UK, it is estimated around 4% of middle-aged men and 2% of middle-aged women have OSA. As someone with OSA may not notice they have the condition themselves, it is likely that OSA often goes undiagnosed. OSA is a treatable condition, and there are a variety of treatment options that can reduce the symptoms. Read more about  treating OSA . Read more about the  complications of OSA . more...



CPAP Benefits BP on Top of Weight Loss in

Two new studies have shed more light on the role of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on cardiovascular risk in patients with sleep apnea. One study shows that in obese patients with moderate to severe sleep apnea, weight loss is the most important intervention and reduces inflammation, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and blood pressure. The second study provides more evidence that CPAP is effective for lowering blood pressure in patients with moderate to severe sleep apnea, even those with blood pressures in the normal range. Lead author of the second paper, Daniel Gottlieb, MD, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, added: "Prior studies have shown that CPAP reduced blood pressure in sleep apnea patients with poorly controlled blood pressures, but our results extend these findings to patients in the normal range. Chirinos commented to Medscape Medical News: "Obesity appears to be responsible for most of the problems associated with sleep apnea, but by correcting sleep apnea with CPAP this will have an incremental effect on blood pressure." But sleep apnea also seems to have an effect on the cardiovascular system — probably mediated by raised blood pressure, and our study confirms this." But CPAP is still indicated for lean patients with sleep apnea to reduce the symptoms of daytime sleepiness." Effect of CPAP vs Oxygen on Blood Pressure in Sleep Apnea. He pointed out that the blood pressure effect of CPAP is greater at night because sleep apnea increases blood pressure acutely at night. "At present we don't have evidence for benefit on blood pressure of CPAP for patients with mild sleep apnea. For these patients the main recommendations are still weight reduction and alcohol reduction." He explained that alcohol relaxes the muscles in the throat, which makes sleep apnea worse. more...



Men’s health : Losing weight can improve sleep and reduce

Men’s health: Losing weight can improve sleep and reduce the risk for sleep apnea. But did you know that by losing weight you can dramatically improve your quality of sleep, reducing the risk for sleep apnea? For men, who are more likely than women to suffer from sleep apnea, the need to lose weight is even more critical. “Men are uniquely at an increased risk for obstructive sleep apnea due to the presence of testosterone,” said University of Minnesota Physicians sleep expert Michael Howell, M. How does weight loss reduce risk for obstructive sleep apnea? Editor’s note: Women can also suffer from obstructive sleep apnea so it is important to keep weight at a healthy level to reduce risk for sleep apnea and the health problems associated with the condition. more...



Can dieting cure sleep apnea? - Sleep Junkies

However, a growing body of research suggests that losing weight is maybe the single most effective way to reduce the symptoms of OSA (obstructive sleep apnea). A Swedish study 2  published in 2011 looked at the effects of a low energy diet on patients with mild to severe cases of obstructive sleep apnea. After this period, the participants were put on a weight loss maintenance programme for weeks 9-52 of the study. At the end of the year, although the average weight loss had dropped to 10kg (24 pounds), participants saw a 58% improvement in sleep apnea symptoms. More surprisingly, when the patients were checked a year later, although some had put the weight back on,  48% of the participants were no longer using their CPAP devices, and 10% experienced  total remission, effectively curing their  sleep apnea . Furthermore, the study found that the more weight patients lost, the more their OSA improved. 13.6% had complete remission of their sleep apnea, compared to 3.8% of the DSE group. These studies show that a structured weight loss programme can be highly effective at reducing the symptoms of OSA, in some cases causing complete remission. Obesity can be both the cause and the result of obstructive sleep apnea, predisposing patients to weight gain. “…the untreated sleep apnea is most likely sabotaging their efforts at weight loss. My approach is to treat the sleep apnea and then work on weight loss with the carrot always being that one day patients may be truly cured of their sleep apnea.”  Losing weight is one of the most effective ways to reduce the symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea as well as adding numerous other health benefits to your life. more...



How can losing weight help my obstructive sleep apnea

Obstructive Sleep Apnea. How can losing weight help my obstructive sleep apnea symptoms? Topics Sleep Sleep Disorders Obstructive Sleep Apnea How can losing weight help my obstructive sleep apnea symptoms? A major cause of obstructive sleep apnea is obesity. Obstructive sleep apnea is a condition that causes repeated episodes of blocked breathing during the night. The main symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea are daytime sleepiness and waking up still feeling tired. While overweight men are most at risk, women and children can also experience obstructive sleep apnea. The good news is that sleep apnea can be treated with lifestyle changes and treatment at a sleep therapy clinic. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Q&As. more...



Weight Gain and Sleep Apnea : What’s the Connection

If you are a male and your neck circumference is larger than 17 inches, then you are more likely to have sleep apnea; for women, the number is 16 inches or more. How Can Losing Weight Help My Sleep Apnea? Losing weight around your neck, chest and abdomen seem to be the easiest way to get rid of most cases of sleep apnea. These same studies show that substantial weight loss can significantly improve the most severe cases of sleep apnea. Changing your diet and exercising more have been proven to help with sleep apnea. If you keep up the healthy routine, then you will start losing weight; diet, exercise and eventual weight loss are a great combination that works to end sleep apnea. If you have sleep apnea, do whatever is in your power to not gain weight. The bottom line is that you can cut your sleep apnea risk greatly with a few lifestyle changes. It is up to you to exercise more, change your diet and lose some weight in the process. more...



Losing Weight to Treat Sleep Apnea

Losing Weight to Treat Sleep Apnea. However, new research suggests that weight loss can be a long-term and lasting solution for those who are overweight and/or obese and suffer from sleep apnea. The prospect of weight loss helping sleep apnea is not all that new. Most of the research that has been conducted in regards to sleep apnea and weight loss has participants on very extreme calorie restrictive diets. This type of calorie restriction would be all but impossible to maintain for the long-term, but if those who find help with their sleep apnea through weight loss gain that weight back, the symptoms likely return as well. The good news is there is a way to achieve weight loss, help your sleep apnea, and keep things that way. If you are struggling with sleep apnea and are overweight or obese, there is a solution for you that does not take your calories down to 500 per day. While this may be a big step for you, your sleep, and the sleep of those around you, may be at stake. more...



Sleep Apnea and Weight Loss

Sleep Apnea and Weight Loss. 252,101 conversations around the web about Sleep Apnea to help you make a decision. Treato found 16,066 discussions about Weight Loss and Sleep Apnea on the web. 6.37% of the posts that mention Sleep Apnea also mention Weight Loss (16,066 posts) Sleep Apnea. Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnoses or treatment. Treato is not responsible for promotions validity, application of the promotion code varies among the different Telehealth sites (for example during registration flow). more...



Lose Weight, Lose Sleep Apnea? - The Huffington Post

Researchers from Finland found that maintaining weight loss of as little as 5 percent is associated with improvement in obstructive sleep apnea, which is a sleep disorder characterized by pauses in breathing during sleep leading to disrupted sleep. For the new study, published in the journal Sleep Medicine , researchers followed 57 people who were obese and had mild obstructive sleep apnea. The researchers specifically wanted to see how a 5 percent weight loss would potentially affect sleep apnea. Plus, people who lost the weight were less likely to have their obstructive sleep apnea progress over the follow-up period than those who didn't lose the weight, researchers found. more...



Obstructive sleep apnoea - Treatment - NHS Choices

Common treatments for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) include making lifestyle changes and using breathing apparatus while you sleep. Sleeping on your side, rather than on your back, may also help relieve the symptoms of OSA if you have been diagnosed with the condition. CPAP is available on the NHS and is the most effective therapy for treating severe cases of OSA. If CPAP causes you discomfort, inform your treatment staff as the device can be modified to make it more comfortable. They are not generally recommended for more severe OSA, although they may be an option if you are unable to tolerate using a CPAP device. It is recommended you have an MAD made for you by a dentist with training and experience in treating sleep apnoea. Tonsillectomy – where the tonsils are removed if they are enlarged and blocking your airway when you sleep. Weight loss (bariatric) surgery  – where the size of the stomach is reduced if you are severely obese and this is making your sleep apnoea worse. This type of surgery can mean you are unable to use a CPAP device properly in the future if you need to. OSA can have a significant impact on the quality of life for someone with the condition, as well as their friends and families. more...



Losing weight and belly fat improves sleep

Losing weight and belly fat improves sleep. If you’re carrying extra pounds, especially around your belly, losing weight and some of that muffin top may help you get better ZZZs. A reduction in belly fat was the best predictor of improved sleep. The results of this trial are in line with other studies exploring how weight affects sleep and sleep affects weight. Linking weight loss, belly fat, and sleep. Excess weight and body fat increase the likelihood of developing obstructive sleep apnea. “So one possibility with the results of this study is that weight loss reduced sleep apnea and improved sleep quality,” says sleep expert Dr. Weight loss also improves blood sugar control which, in people with diabetes or prediabetes, could reduce restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movement disorders, two sleep disorders that people with diabetes are prone to having. We do know that fat deposited around the abdomen, called visceral fat, is associated with heart disease, diabetes, dementia, breast and colon cancers, and other chronic health conditions. “Generally, if you lose weight, some of this will occur in belly fat. Instead, the solution is old-fashioned exercise and a healthy diet. The lasting effects of combining exercise and weight loss will go far beyond improving your long winter’s nap and well into a healthy future. more...



Can Losing Weight Cure Sleep Apnea? - Doctor Steven Y

Can Losing Weight Cure Sleep Apnea? The more severe your sleep apnea, the less likely you’ll reach normal levels if you lose significant weight. Researchers followed 44 obese people with obstructive sleep apnea who were enrolled in a 2 year weight loss program. 3 Responses to “Can Losing Weight Cure Sleep Apnea?” I used exercise to cure my sleep apnea, but I don’t feel that it was just about the weight loss. After the weight loss in 2013 August, I went for another sleep study and it was scheduled to be a split study. Reason I think this is due to no cpap applied during my study as they would need to calibrate the air pressure as even if I still had symptoms of sleep apnea, I would not need as much pressure due to weight loss. Ford’s statement that exercise has anything to do with the abatement of sleep apnea symptoms. It is completely due to weight loss only that I feel my sleep apnea has abated. It’s all about weight loss and nothing to do with exercise as far as reducing or removing sleep apnea symptoms. more...



Sleep Apnea and Weight Loss - Ask the Expert

Home > > Ask The Expert > > Losing Weight with Sleep Apnea. What are the typical behavioral and psychological factors that contribute to weight gain? Studies suggest that it's not necessarily our chronological age that makes us so tired or fatigued, but it could be related to obesity, not necessarily obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), just obesity. It's a vicious cycle where we sleep poorly, we are less motivated to increase physical activity, and so we gain more weight, which leads to obesity related issues including sleep apnea. How many of your sleep apnea patients are overweight? The majority of our patients are obese. There seems to be a relationship between obesity and obstructive sleep apnea; however, we have to point out that not every obese patient by body mass index has obstructive sleep apnea. There are patients who have normal body mass indexes who are diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea. more...



Lose Weight Before Trying Other Sleep Apnea Treatments

But most of the time, they're probably not the first thing to try for sleep apnea. The big surprise here is that the doctors didn't find any evidence that sleep apnea boosts a person's risk of death. But the guideline committee didn't find any research that measured risk of death, heart disease or stroke in people with sleep apnea. "I had gotten it into my head that sleep apnea increased the risk of premature death," Cooke told Shots. The reviewers also found out that surgery didn't help most people, even though it's been heavily promoted for sleep apnea. "It's not the get-it-over-with panacea that people sometimes think it is." "Not everyone with sleep apnea is overweight, but most patients are," Cooke says. Patients who still have symptoms at that point might need to go to a sleep clinic and do an overnight test for apnea. For people who are diagnosed by a sleep clinic, the No. Safwan Badr , a sleep physician and president of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. "CPAP corrects more of the abnormalities that are seen in a sleep study." more...



Sleep apnea - University of Maryland Medical Center

Sleep apnea. Obstructive sleep apnea is the most common. Sleep apnea is a potentially serious condition and should be treated. Opium - This remedy may be prescribed for individuals with sleep apnea and narcolepsy (inability to control falling asleep during the daytime). However, this is not the same as sleep apnea. Treatment options for obstructive sleep apnea. The association between sleep apnea and young adults with hypertension. Obstructive sleep apnea, daytime sleepiness, and type 2 diabetes. Physical findings in the upper airways related to obstructive sleep apnea in men and women. The effect of exercise on obstructive sleep apnea: a randomized and controlled trial. more...



Weight Loss and Sleep Apnea - SomnoMedSomnoMed US

> Weight Loss and Sleep Apnea. With our history of innovation and our commitment to connecting physicians and dentists, Somno Med is surrounding obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients with the products and services they need to return to enjoying their lives. Losing weight — and keeping it off — could help sleep apnea from getting worse and could even reverse it. Usually, the very first treatment for sleep apnea among overweight people should be weight loss, and the second treatment option should be continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or a Somno Dent oral device . If sleep apnea just made you tired and grumpy, it would be bad enough, but it’s actually more serious: like anything else that keeps you. It also affects metabolism and metabolic disorders: in this study , for example, the worse the subjects’ sleep apnea was, the worse their glucose tolerance was. This review goes through all the evidence on sleep apnea and metabolic syndrome. Tips for Weight Loss and Sleep Apnea. Even a moderate weight loss (10% of body weight) can significantly improve sleep apnea. An interesting clue is the connection between sleep apnea and metabolic syndrome. Sleep apnea and Type 2 Diabetes are very closely connected, not surprising considering the effects of apnea on glucose metabolism. The metabolic damage that frequently comes along with apnea might be one of the reasons why people with sleep apnea find it so hard to lose weight. Take in fewer calories than you expend with these helpful diet tips for weight loss and sleep apnea:  more...



Sleep Apnea and Weight Loss - Can Weight Loss Cure Sleep

Sleep Apnea And Weight Loss. Can Weight loss cure sleep apnea? The question is: Can you permanently cure sleep apnea with weight loss? However, weight loss can cure sleep apnea permanently for many patients with obstructive apnea. Sleep apnea and weight loss that can cure obstructive apnea is not a myth, theory or a spin anymore. You can cure sleep apnea with weight loss. Weight loss is always welcomed when you have sleep apnea. It's difficult, but you can cure sleep apnea with weight loss. Which people can be helped with weight loss to cure their sleep apnea? The topic about sleep apnea and weight loss should interest every person with weight problems. Weight Loss Surgery for Sleep Apnea. It is a real revelation for the once theory of weight loss curing obstructive sleep apnea. Weight loss is very difficult, especially if you have sleep apnea. more...



Sleep Apnea and Weight Loss - Classic Sleep Care

Sleep Apnea & Weight Loss. Patients > Sleep Apnea & Weight Loss. If you are overweight and want to lose weight, you MUST get proper restorative sleep. As described in the Vicious Cycle page, if you are overweight and want to lose weight, you MUST get proper restorative sleep. It’s nearly impossible if you are clinically obese and are not sleeping properly because you have undiagnosed sleep apnea. If you are planning bariatric surgery to help you lose weight your doctor should schedule you for a sleep study before surgery. Undiagnosed and /or untreated sleep apnea can impact you both pre-operatively and post-operatively. If you are obese (particularly if you are morbidly obese) and want to lose weight you should: Losing weight when you are not achieving restorative sleep is really hard. Getting restorative sleep is the key to achieving and maintaining weight loss. more...



Obstructive Sleep Apnea : The Johns Hopkins Digestive

Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome. Physicians are positive that this link exists, because when patients with sleep apnea lose weight, their sleep apnea improves. Risks of obstructive sleep apnea. How much weight do I need to lose to improve my obstructive sleep apnea? Only your doctor will really be able to give you a target number for how much weight you will need to lose to see an improvement in your obstructive sleep apnea and symptoms. Can obstructive sleep apnea make it harder for me to lose weight? The good news is that at Johns Hopkins, our weight loss specialists can consult with experienced sleep disorders specialists. Working together, they can design a sleep hygiene program that will help you get the rest you need so that you can lose weight. more...




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