Protein to carb ratio for losing weight


5 Reasons Why Protein is Good For Weight Loss

5 Reasons Why Protein is Good For Weight Loss. As you undergo your weight loss journey, you might question why protein is so prized. Here are 5 reasons why protein can be your weight loss pal: PROTEIN SATISFIES & SAVES CALORIES  In the beginning of your weight loss journey, protein is important because it helps you feel fuller longer. If this happens over the course of multiple days your calorie savings can help with weight loss. As you are losing weight, your body loses both muscle and fat (I know, bummer!). During this process it is especially important that you continue to eat enough protein in your diet. Additionally, if you strength train consider having a high protein snack right after a training session when the muscle is sensitive to nutrients that it can use to repair and grow. But, you can still make protein a pal on your weight loss journey by getting enough protein in your daily diet. more...



Ten Reasons You Are not Losing Fat on a Low - Carb Diet

Whether you agree with the above quote or think it’s hilarious nonsense, there’s no doubt that reduced carb diets are useful for losing body fat. Simply cutting the average American man’s carb intake of 310 grams a day in half could be considered low-carb, but if you are overweight and your goal is fat loss, you most likely need to go a lot lower than 155 grams. A useful definition of a low-carb fat loss diet is less than 50 grams of carbs a day, which will lead to the production of ketones. When the body is producing ketones it is no longer relying on glucose (sugar from carbs) for its fuel source, which is a state that provides significant metabolic benefits and easier fat loss. Fix It: If you’re active, pretty lean, and trying to lose fat on a very low-carb diet, try one of the following: Calories may be too low, or the ratio between fat, protein, and carbs may be off. If you don’t adequately increase the fat you eat, energy production will be sluggish and you won’t be able to sustain your new way of eating. The actual percentage will obviously vary based on carb and protein intake, but you absolutely want to make fat intake a priority. Although some people may be eating a low-carb diet and eliminating plant foods, this is generally not the best choice for a few reasons: Fix It: If you choose to eat “cheat” meals, post-workout is the best time to do so because you will have depleted muscle glycogen stores (the form of carbs that are stored in your muscles to fuel exercise) during training and your body will be primed to replenish those stores with any carbs you eat post-workout. •    They improve metabolic flexibility and the body’s ability to use both fat and carbs for energy. This will improve balance of the hormones that make you hungry and allow you to develop confidence in your eating habits. Although there is evidence that a high processed meat intake increases cancer and mortality risk, this is not the same thing as a low-carb diet done properly. When you shift to a low-carb diet, your body ends up excreting more sodium and water as it loses muscle glycogen (the storage form of carbs in the muscle). more...



Nutrition Diva : Double Your Protein, Lose More Fat

Double Your Protein, Lose More Fat? Find out whether increasing your protein intake is a good idea. If you follow health and nutrition news, I bet you saw some variation on the following: "Double your protein to prevent muscle loss." Now, I'm a big fan of protein, for reasons I explained in my episode, "How Much Protein Should You Eat    But before you order that 16-egg omelet, let's take a closer look at the study behind the recent headlines and figure out what (if anything) it really means for you. When we try to lose weight, we want to lose the extra fat on our bodies. Researchers wanted to see if increasing the amount of protein in the diet might protect against muscle loss during weight loss. One group ate the Recommended Daily Allowance for protein, which amounts to about 10% of calories, or 50g per day. The second group ate twice that much and a third group ate 3 times that much. more...



High Protein, Low - Carbohydrate Diets

High-protein, low-carbohydrate diets, like The Atkins Diet , have been widely promoted as effective weight loss plans . The Risks of High-Protein, Low-Carb Diets. If you have any kidney problems, eating too much protein puts added strain on your kidneys . When you're on a high- protein diet , you may urinate more calcium than normal. Is a Low-Carb Diet Right for You? If you're considering a high-protein diet, check with your doctor or a nutritionist to see if it's OK for you. They can help you come up with a plan that will make sure you're getting enough fruits and vegetables , and that you're getting lean protein foods. Remember, weight loss that lasts is usually based on changes you can live with for a long time, not a temporary diet. more...



A whey - protein supplement increases fat loss and spares

A whey-protein supplement increases fat loss and spares lean muscle in obese subjects: a randomized human clinical study. Statistical analyses were performed on all subjects that completed (completer analysis) and all subjects that lost at least 2.25 kg of body weight (responder analysis). Both groups lost a significant amount of weight and the Prolibra group tended to lose more weight than the control group; however the amount of weight loss was not significantly different between groups after 12 weeks. Prolibra subjects lost significantly more body fat compared to control subjects for both the completer (2.81 vs. 1.62 kg P = 0.03) and responder (3.63 vs. Prolibra subjects lost significantly less lean muscle mass in the responder group (1.07 vs. The ratio of fat to lean loss (kg fat lost/kg lean lost) was much larger for Prolibra subjects for both completer (3.75 vs. 1.05) and responder (3.39 vs. Subjects in both the control and treatment group lost a significant amount of weight with a 500 calorie reduced diet. Subjects taking Prolibra lost significantly more body fat and showed a greater preservation of lean muscle compared to subjects consuming the control beverage. Because subjects taking Prolibra lost 6.1% of their body fat mass, and because a 5% reduction of body fat mass has been shown to reduce the risk of obesity related disease, the results have practical significance. more...



The Right Way to Lose Fat : What to Eat - Breaking Muscle

The Right Way to Lose Fat: What to Eat. So, bubble-wrap your weight scale and put it in the basement or attic and focus on your body composition: the fat to muscle ratio. What about the glycemic content of carbs and blood sugar levels? But what guarantees the weight loss to be fat only? People with a lower percent of body fat will lose more muscle and retain more fat with a significant calorie deficit. This is why attention must be paid to the correct calorie deficit based on your existing percentage of fat and your activity level. Past thinking was to eat .7 to 1.0 grams of protein per pound of body weight, load up on the carbs for energy, and minimize the fat. After all, 15 grams of fat has 135 calories and 15 grams of carbs has only 60, so to help shed the pounds, back off on the fat intake. The type of protein, carb, and fat must be considered as well as how the body processes them. The fat and protein also consumed at feedings can help lower the overall glycemic level. more...



Double Up Your Protein to Lose Weight

And many may think that adding more protein to their diet will pack on muscle, which may lead to weight gain. But in addition to be satiating, increasing your protein intake may help you lose weight while maintaining fat-burning muscle, according to new research. After 31 days, the group consuming twice the RDA of protein saw the greatest reduction in fat mass while maintaining muscle. more...



How to Count Calories to Lose Weight - The Basic Blueprint

What I’ve got for you is a 5 step “blueprint” to lose weight by counting calories, covering how many calories you should eat in a day to lose to carb/protein/fat ratios, and more. For example, if your body burns 2000 calories a day but you eat only 1700 calories a day, you create a calorie deficit of 300 calories a day and you’ll lose weight. If your body burns 2000 calories a day and you eat 2300 calories a day, you’re creating a calorie surplus of 300 calories, and you’ll end up gaining weight over time. The easiest way to figure out how many calories you should be eating to create a calorie deficit is to use the Fit Watch Calorie Deficit Calculator . The calculator will take into account approximately how many calories you burn in a day and give you a few choices for a calorie deficit. Once you use the Calorie Deficit Calculator , write down the number of calories you’re going to eat in a day. If you eat the right proportions of carbs, protein and fat, you’ll not only be healthy, but you’ll curb cravings and feel less hungry. If you’ve never counted calories before, the baseline of 50% carbs, 30% protein and 20% fat is a good way to start. Okay, so you know how many calories you’re going to eat in a day and what macronutrient ratios you’ll be using. All you need to do is enter the food you eat and the quantities, and… The tracker will add up all the calories and figure out the percentages of carbs, protein and fat (and alcohol). more...



The Best Ratio of Carbs, Protein and Fat

The Best Ratio of Carbs, Protein & Fat. Macronutrients - the big three of protein, carbohydrates and fat - are the cornerstone of any dietary plan. The best ratio for you depends on age. Children 1 to 3 years old should have a diet that contains 45 percent to 65 percent carbohydrate, up to 20 percent protein and 30 percent to 40 percent fat. From age 4 to 18, the percentage of carbohydrate stays the same, but protein increases to as much as 30 percent of the diet, while fat should be not more than 35 percent of the diet. The proportion of carbohydrate is also the same for adults, but protein should be 10 percent to 35 percent of the total food intake, and fat should be 20 percent to 35 percent. more...



Optimal protein/carb/fat ratio to support lean mass gain

I am in the process of getting back into weight lifting after a long layoff. I am on the thin side and the goal is to increase muscle mass. I want to develop a "diet" that will help me gain mass without the use of supplements. Show more I am in the process of getting back into weight lifting after a long layoff. Anyone have any suggestions of good foods and the optimal ratio of protein to carbohydrates? The best way to do this is those extra 500 calories you get before you go to bed. Every once and a while you can cut this Weight. Bodybuilders do the same thing, get big then cut fat, it is the only way to gain mass quickly and keep lean. more...



3 Keys To Dialing In Your Macronutrient Ratios

Low fat intake can also impair absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins A , D , E , and K . This will help determine how well you tolerate carbs and establish where in the above ranges you should start. Start with the body type you most resemble, and tweak as necessary. Diet Recommendations: Ectomorphs should stick to the high end of the range for carbohydrates, between 30-60 percent of total calories, depending on whether the goal is mass gains, maintenance, or fat loss. I recommend the high end for mass gains, the mid-upper end for maintenance (45-55 percent), and the low-end for fat loss. At least 25 percent of total calories should come from protein, with the remainder from fat. Again, I recommend the high-end for mass gains (40-50 percent), the middle for maintenance (30-40), and low-end for fat loss (20-30). Because excess carbohydrates in the endomorph's diet end up as fat, a high carbohydrate intake will make it difficult for them to get lean or lose weight. Here, I recommend no more than 30-40 percent carbohydrates for mass gains, the middle range for maintenance (20-30), and low-end for fat loss (10-20). As with the other body types, protein and fat provide the remainder of your calories, with 25-50 percent of total calories from protein and 15-40 percent from fat. In general, women are more efficient at burning fat and less efficient at burning the glycogen stored in muscle. Then, start on the low end for carbohydrates and see how you do. more...



Fat - Protein - Carb ratio? - Low Carb Friends

Fat - Protein - Carb ratio? What is the most effective Fat - Protein - Carb ratio? It is important to know these ratios to optimize weight loss on Induction and into the future. I will be through with the Fat Fast tomorrow and restart Induction. If you're losing weight and feel good on induction with 20g of carbs then that's all you need to know. If you track your macros (fat/protein/carb) then you can change one variable at a time and see if that helps get the weight off. I use a calorie/food tracking site and I tweaked the standard ratios to 5% carbs (19grams for me), 70% fat, and 25% protein. I think you should pick a carb level ( grams ), then add in protein ( percentage :15-25 % ), and the rest will be fat. I make sure I am above 60 % fat, and that works well for me. If you drop fat, you increase protein, or carbs, and both can spike BG, whereas fat will not. So set the carbs and protein, and eat the rest in fat, until you are full, or reached you caloric minimum level. more...



Ketogenic Ratio and Weight Loss - Sweet Geek

Ketogenic Ratio and Weight Loss. One of the tools I have been using to decide if my meals are ketogenic is to calculate my Ketogenic Ratio. That is the ratio of foods that raise ketones vs the foods that lower ketones, i.e. Ketogenic Ratio (KR) = (Fat * .9 + Protein * .46) / (Carb * 1 + Protein * .58 + Fat * .1) Ketogenic Ratio. Not ketogenic, if healthy you won’t register ketones. Mildly ketogenic, you may register ketones at this level. My interpretation is that you calculate the calories you are eating and compare that to how much you theoretically burn. I would add 20g to the Fat variable in the formula and then calculate my ratio. My take is that as long as you are making ketones and are at a slight calorie deficit (it doesn’t have to be 500 cal / day) you will eventually lose weight*. more...



The Carb to Protein Ratio Diet - Project Swole

I have written, on numerous occasions, about reducing your carbohydrate intake and increasing your protein intake to lose fat and maintain muscle mass when dieting. The protein is a little lower than I usually recommend and the carbs are definitely higher than I recommend for most fat loss diets. That being understood, this diet plan is based on a study at the University of Illinois and aims only at maintaining the proper ratio of carbs to protein for ideal fat loss and muscle retention. For maintaining muscle mass, you can use the bodyweight column based on your current weight. For gaining muscle or losing fat you can use the bodyweight column based on your desired bodyweight. To customize this chart for your own needs and to get more accurate numbers: To gain muscle with a fast metabolism, start with your desired bodyweight and multiply by 14 to get total daily calories. To gain muscle with a slow metabolism, start with your current bodyweight and multiply by 13 to get total daily calories. To lose fat with a fast metabolism, start with your current bodyweight and multiply by 13 to get total daily calories. To lose fat with a slow metabolism, start with your desired bodyweight and multiply by 12 to get total daily calories. Multiply total daily calories by .0751 to get total protein grams, multiply by 4 to get total protein calories. Multiply total protein grams by 1.4 to get total carbohydrate grams, multiply by 4 to get total carbohydrate calories. For example, you may need to increase protein for gaining muscle or decrease carbs for losing fat, but those adjustments should be based on your results after the first couple weeks of dieting. Increasing your protein intake and decreasing your carbohydrate intake will help you to maintain (or even gain) muscle while losing fat on a weight loss diet. more...



Ideal Keto Ratio to Build Lean Muscle - Low Carbe Diem

The bad news: some of that weight loss is fat and some is lean muscle tissue. The body tries to preserve fat stores and is perfectly willing to sacrifice muscle instead. Low Carb Saves Muscle. Low carbers retain the greatest amount of lean body mass compared to restricted-calorie and high carb diets. Low Carb and Keto. Low carbers enter a special, metabolic state of ketosis where the body uses it’s consumed and stored fat for fuel. Because low carb diets naturally provide enough fat to use for energy, the body spares your muscle’s protein. Your body will use stored fat for fuel while sparing the protein our muscles need to strengthen and develop. Done properly, the low carb ketogenic diet will not cause muscle loss. When you consume enough protein in the correct ratio, there’s no need for the body to break down its muscle tissue. A typical ratio for calorie intake could be 65% fat, 30% protein and 5% carbohydrates for weight or fat loss. A small increase in carbs and decrease in fat is a basic way to discover the right levels for your body. If you begin to gain fat, simply adjust the ratio: decrease the carbs, and increase your fat intake. Getting 65%-75% of your calories from fat gives the body enough fuel to operate. more...



The Best Ratio of Carbs, Fat, and Fiber for a Healthy Diet

The Best Ratio of Carbs, Fat, and Fiber for a Healthy Diet. For optimal health, balance your carbs, fat and fiber. What Is the Connection Between Eating a Surplus of Carbohydrates and Gaining Body Fat? The carbohydrates and fats you consume play a big role in health and weight loss. Between 50 and 60 percent of your total daily calorie intake should come in the form of carbohydrates, according to Group Health Cooperative. Carbohydrates contain four calories per gram, so take half your daily calorie intake and divide it by four to work out how many grams of carbs you need per day. The United States Department of Agriculture Guidelines state that between 20 and 35 percent of your daily calories should come from fat. Fat has nine calories per gram, so find 20 to 35 percent of your total daily calorie intake, then divide by nine to get the total grams of fat you need each day. more...



How Protein Helps Weight Loss - Health and

The amount of quality protein in your diet is the single most important calorie that influences your metabolic rate, favorably influencing weight loss. The FDA says you need 50 grams of protein per day (200 calories), based on a 2,000 calorie diet, or 10 percent of your calories from protein. It ignores the amount of protein needed to preserve muscle during weight loss and facilitate fat burning. The heavier your ideal weight and the more active you are, the more calories you can consume. If you are not highly active, yet are at an ideal weight, then eat 25 percent protein, 40 percent carbohydrates, and 35 percent fat. He has found that the high protein, leucine rich diet, in combination with lower carbohydrates (150 grams or 600 calories per day) is effective to support weight loss, blood sugar metabolism, and a variety of factors that have an impact on cardiovascular health. This means that on a high protein diet, the weight that is lost is mostly fat, not muscle. In order to benefit from high protein for weight loss, the amount of carbohydrates must be reduced, which is rule #5 of the Leptin Diet®: Reduce the amount of carbohydrates eaten. As you build strength, you will be far healthier, your p H will be better, and you will be able to get the benefits of eating a higher protein diet; for most people, it is simply a matter of increasing protein and reducing carbohydrates. Higher amounts of high quality, leucine rich protein are needed for fitness, healthy weight loss, and to maintain weight following a weight loss program. more...



Low - carb diet : Can it help you lose weight? - Mayo Clinic

Low-carb diet: Can it help you lose weight? Could a low-carb diet give you an edge in losing weight? Here's what you need to know about the low-carb diet. A low-carb diet limits carbohydrates — such as those found in grains, starchy vegetables and fruit — and emphasizes foods high in protein and fat. Each diet has varying restrictions on the types and amounts of carbohydrates you can eat. A low-carb diet is generally used for losing weight. Why you might follow a low-carb diet. You might choose to follow a low-carb diet because you: As the name says, a low-carb diet restricts the type and amount of carbohydrates you eat. Typical foods for a low-carb diet. Some low-carb diet plans allow small amounts of certain fruits, vegetables and whole grains. A daily limit of 60 to 130 grams of carbohydrates is typical with a low-carb diet. more...



Carb/Protein/Fat ratio - Calorie Count

In doing so, I realized that there is a lot of varying advice on what the correct ratio should be of carbs/protein/fat. Which ratio should I be using for the best results? The ratio that will work best for your weight loss goals will depend on your body type, metabolism and activity level. That unfortunately means experimenting untill you figure out what works best for you. If that's the case for you I would shoot for the lower carb ratio and an emphasis on lean protein and healthy fats. If you have a normal metabolism and didn't have a persistant weight problem pre-pregnancy a more equalized ratio would probably work fine for you. Try a few different ratios till you find one that works for you, and try to eat mainly "whole foods"/unprocessed foods to get the most nutrition for your calories. The answer is that there really isn't one "right" ratio for everybody. It depends on what your goals and tolerances are. If you think about it, the standard common sense advice about healthy diets is to eat your vegetables. From there, you'd get a good sense of whether your ratio is higher on the carb or protein side. more...



Just cut calories – protein/carb/fat ratio doesn’t matter

Some, but not all, studies have demonstrated that high protein, low carbohydrate diets work better than others at losing fat and preserving muscle mass over the short term. Visceral fat packs itself around the organs and secretes chemicals that increase the body’s resistance to the hormone insulin and cause inflammation throughout the body. The current study – called the Pounds Lost trial – set out to determine whether the composition of a weight loss diet affected the loss of lean muscle, total body fat, abdominal fat, visceral fat or liver fat in 424 overweight or obese men and women. (Excess visceral fat is thought to release fat into the bloodstream causing a build-up of fat in the liver.) At the six-month mark, participants had lost, on average, more than nine pounds of total body fat along with five pounds of lean muscle, but had regained some of this after two years. Fat loss or muscle loss did not differ between the four diet groups. As well, the proportion of protein, carbohydrate or fat in the diet did not affect the amount of abdominal fat, visceral fat or liver fat that was lost during the study. After six months, participants shed about 40 per cent of visceral fat and 60 per cent of liver fat. At the two-year follow-up, people were able to maintain a weight loss of more nine pounds, including three pounds of abdominal fat. The bottom line: The major factor for weight loss was adherence to a calorie-reduced diet, not the proportion of carbohydrate, protein or fat it contained. People who followed their diets better lost more weight and body fat than those who didn’t. An earlier report from the Pounds Lost trial revealed that all four diets were heart-healthy regardless of their protein, carbohydrate and fat content. If your 2012 goal is to shed excess body fat, the following tips will help you adhere to a healthy diet plan and increase the likelihood of success. Whether that means turning down sweets at the office or asking a server to hold the buttery sauce, being assertive will get you closer to your goal. The more monitoring you do – and feedback you get – the better you’ll do. more...



Do high fat, low carb diets work

Consumer magazines praise the "high-protein low-carbohydrate" diet as a panacea for the American weight problem. Shike: These "high-protein, low-carbohydrate" diets have not been proven to be safe or effective in the long run. We know, for example, that high-protein diets may be harmful to the kidneys, and are associated with calcium loss, which can result in bone problems. Another problem with the low-carbohydrate diets is that they may be deficient in essential nutrients such as calcium, potassium and various vitamins. Shike: It's true that consuming high-protein or high-fat diets may initially induce weight loss in some people. People lose weight not because of the altered food balance, but simply because they are restricting calories. Discovery Health: But what about the fact that high-protein diets appear to reduce insulin requirements in diabetics? Shike: In the overweight person, increased insulin requirements are related primarily to excess body weight. In people who routinely test high for blood sugars, losing weight frequently lowers it, and may even return blood glucose levels to the normal range. Shike: Diets work to induce weight loss when they restrict calories. more...



How Much Carbs, Fat and Protein Should You Eat Daily to

How Much Carbs, Fat and Protein Should You Eat Daily to Lose Weight? A well-balanced diet should contain adequate carbohydrate, protein and fat. However, if your goal is permanent weight loss you will need to adopt healthy behaviors and a nutrition plan that you can maintain throughout your life. For gradual weight loss resulting in a 1- to 2-pound loss each week, you need to decrease your calorie intake by 500 to 1,000 calories per day. For weight loss it's ideal to choose foods high in whole grains and fiber. For weight loss and overall health choose a diet with 45 to 65 percent of total daily calories from complex carbohydrates including whole grains, brown rice, whole-wheat pasta, fruits and vegetables. Protein-rich foods should provide 10 to 35 percent of your total daily calories. Choose lean protein sources such as chicken, turkey, fish, Greek yogurt and low-fat milk for your weight loss plan. Limiting fat calories in the diet can also help decrease your overall total calorie intake. Fat should provide approximately 20 to 35 percent of your total daily calories and be mostly in the form of unsaturated fats from plant and fish sources. Saturated and trans fats should be limited for weight loss and also for disease prevention. more...



What’s the Best Protein - to - Carb Ratio for Weight Loss?Peak

At the end of the 12 weeks, researchers found that all participants lost a significant amount of weight, with the normal protein group losing a bit more than the low-protein and high-protein groups. However, those in the normal protein group lost more total body fat as a percentage of total weight than the women in the low- and high-protein groups. When it came to waist circumference, those women in the normal protein group lost 11.6 centimeters, as compared to just 7.9 in the low-protein group and 8.6 in the high-protein group. For hip circumference, the normal protein group lost 8.8 centimeters, with just 7.4 lost in the low-protein group. On the blood pressure front, those in the high-protein group saw a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure (10.6 mm Hg), as compared to the low-protein group (8.7 mm Hg) and the normal protein group (8.1 mm Hg). Numbers were closer when it came to diastolic blood pressure, with decreases measuring in at 5.4 mm Hg, 5.7 mm Hg, and 5 mm Hg for the low-, normal, and high-protein groups, respectively. Resting heart rate decreased across all groups, with the normal protein group seeing the largest reduction at 13 beats per minute (bpm). The low group had a mere 5.6 bpm reduction and the high group enjoyed an 8.8 bpm decrease. While there were no significant differences in fasting glucose levels, insulin levels decreased significantly in the high-protein (71 pmol/l) and normal protein groups (66 pmol/l). All groups saw reductions in triglycerides, total cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol levels, though the differences between groups were not significant. The normal group had less than half that reduction at 1.74, while the high-protein group had a miniscule 0.34 decrease. more...



The Golden Ratio - Carbs, Protein, and Fat

The Golden Ratio - Carbs, Protein, and Fat. The recommendation is to have a good ratio of calories, 40-50% Carbs, 25-35% protein, 20-30% fat. This information can be found once you enter information into your Food Log and using the Analysis tool from the top menu. It is recommended to never go below 1200 calories if you are a female, because your body will go into starvation mode and it is possible that you might gain weight, besides doing serious damage to your body. Your body needs 1200 calories per day to survive (credit to Saroful). -The heart needs 12% of the calories (144 cals) -The kidney needs 12% of the calories (144 cals) -The Liver needs 23% of the calories (276 cals) -The brain needs 23% of the calories (276 cals) -The skeletal muscle needs 30% of the calories (360 cals) By just simply sitting, walking to your car, driving, talking with others, and all the other tiny little processes you do each day, it's estimated around 2000 calories for the "average person" to consume. In other words, if I go out and lift weights for an hour (about 350 calories.which I think is a little low, but whatever) and just live my life for a day, I actually burn around 2500 calories. One of the easiest, most succesfful and healthy ways I lost weight was:   to eat healthy food, i.e lean meats, leafy greens and veggies and whole grains. And finally and this sounds like it will help you alot is, I didnt eat anything after 6pm. more...



So what is an ideal ratio of fat, protein and carbs

So what is an ideal ratio of fat, protein and carbs? Proteins and amino acids are not unnecessary and you need the amount that your musculo-skeletal system requires, but this too is an amount, not a ratio. He advises that 1.5 to 2.0 grams per kg of ideal weight for protein. Generally speaking, if you're looking for Nutritional Ketosis, the ratios are 65-80% total calories from fat, and protein up to your personal needs (as the formulas above indicate). Atkins tends to fall on the 65% side of that for many of the menus in the book, and in OWL and beyond those fat ratios can fall a bit, depending on the needs of the person. Whatever food helps you lose weight and maintain that loss is the ideal for you. People talk about drinking tons of hwc and coconut oil and eating the visible fat off of steaks and enjoying that- that's not for me. I want 80% of the diet to be fat so I guess after fat and protein are counted the rest can be carbs. Generally aiming for 60-65% fat is enough to satiate most people and not have them overdoing protein or carbs. I absolutely agree with this, and I think that the online trackers are responsible for people being so concerned with percentages. That never allows for 'high fat,' but my body seems to prefer this WOE, and I feel best eating this way. I have been doing a higher fat woe for a number of months now and couldn't tell you what the percentage of fat is in my daily food. If on the otherhand you wish to do a higher fat, moderate protein, low carb plan - there is no reason not to. more...



Ask the Dietitian : What’s the Best Carb, Protein and Fat

Carbohydrates are an important source of fuel for our muscles during exercise and are the only source of energy for our brain and red blood cells. Fat is equally important, playing major roles in everything from brain function to cell structure, but if you’re trying to lose weight, it may not hurt to trade some carbohydrates and/or fat calories for a boost in protein. Calorie for calorie, protein has the most metabolic benefits for weight loss: it increases satiety, stimulates energy expenditure and preserves muscle, which unfortunately is used for energy along with fat during weight loss. For most, it is perfectly safe to adjust carbohydrate, protein and fat consumption to optimize the diet for weight loss. You may find it beneficial to trade a percentage of your calories from carbohydrates or even fat, for protein calories. As a jumping off point, let’s review the current recommendations for carbohydrates, protein and fat, as well as My Fitness Pal’s default goals for these nutrients: This is important because if we do not get enough carbohydrates from our diet, the body will break down protein (which it can turn into glucose) to maintain blood sugar levels and fuel the brain and red blood cells. My Fitness Pal’s current default goals distribute calories as follows: 50% from carbohydrates, 20% from protein and 30% from fat. To help you visualize some modest modifications, here’s a table summarizing a couple of options for safely cutting back on calories from carbohydrates and fat while increasing protein intake to optimize the diet for weight loss: For those primarily interested in cutting calories from carbohydrates, a 1,200-calorie diet with 45% of calories from carbohydrates would provide 135 grams of carbohydrates, thus meeting the RDA of 130 grams. Hypothetically speaking, a 1,300-calorie diet with as few as 40% calories from carbohydrates (below the recommended minimum) would still meet the RDA for carbohydrates. If you’re currently using My Fitness Pal’s default goals and want to trade some carb calories for protein, the 45:25 carbohydrate-to-protein ratio may be a good place to start. more...



Ask the Ripped Dude : Is There a Magical Macronutrient

Ask The Ripped Dude: Is There A Magical Macronutrient Ratio For Fat Loss? I'm trying to lose some fat, but everywhere I go to look for helpful information, I get conflicting views on the proper macronutrient ratio. Your body type, metabolism and weekly physical activity level all have some bearing on your ideal percentages for that moment in time. It may change if and when your body weight or body fat fluctuates, or if you run into any plateaus. Then there's the fact that you have to continuously manipulate your ratios throughout any fat-loss plan. The macronutrient ratio I typically play with for maintenance purposes is 50% protein, 35% carbs and 15% fats. That ratio won't necessarily work for you because you have a different body type, fitness goal and activity level. If you're not sure which type you are—or how to even begin thinking about your macros—here are the ISSA recommendations: Ectomorph: If you're an ectomorph, you're naturally thin with skinny limbs and a high tolerance for carbohydrates. A good starting macronutrient ratio for you would be something like 25% protein, 55% carbs and 20% fat. They have a moderate carbohydrate tolerance and a moderate metabolic rate. If you're an endomorph, try a ratio of 35% protein, 25% carbs and 40% fat. Don't let your body type be an excuse for not reaching your goals. more...



Carb, Protein, Fat Calorie Calculator

Some argue that manipulating macronutrient levels is a successful technique for both losing fat and gaining muscle. Flexible Dieting is a newer dietary technique that is proving popular - and has very few restrictions on what can be eaten (see a useful macro calculator for flexible dieters ). 130+ pages including the basics, tips, recipes, meal plans, exercise guides and much more. Gary Taubes' book Good Calories, Bad Calories delves into how our bodies are for more complex than first thought, and processing of fat is not simply about energy intake. His paper " The science of obesity " argues that the energy balance (calories in, calories out) is just a hypothesis. Other research argues that it's only reduced calories that works, regardless of which macronutrients are emphasized. The reality is - you must find what works for you - and to do this you have to start somewhere! The fat in a Big Mac and Fries can contain enough fat for an entire days intake! The bottom line is to make sure your nutrient ratios are promoting the desired weight loss and having a positive effect on your overall health. The science of obesity: what do we really know about what makes us fat? Comparison of weight-loss diets with different compositions of fat, protein, and carbohydrates. The Macro-Nutrient and Daily Calorie Needs calculators I use all the time. more...



More Protein = More Weight Loss? - Men's Health

People who follow high-protein diets may have more success losing weight than those who eat less protein and more carbohydrates, says research published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Half of the subjects were assigned to a high-protein diet (on average, about 120 grams of protein per day), while the other half consumed a standard-protein diet (on average, about 67 grams per day). You may lose more weight on a high-protein diet because your body spends more energy processing dietary protein than it does carbohydrates, Wycherley says. Think of it this way: If you eat 100 calories of protein, your body will burn about 20 to 30 of those calories while processing the protein, says Wycherley. Another reason for the weight loss may be because protein helps preserve muscle mass. And since muscle mass burns more calories than other types of mass, the additional calorie burn could result in a decrease in weight. (Looking for the best sources of protein for men? So how much protein does the average guy need? Men between the ages of 19 and 70 should shoot for 56 grams per day, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And if you only hit the gym twice a week for around 30 minutes, you're in the clear. more...



Protein, Carb, and Fat Ratios

Here’s why: It’s almost impossible to eat too much protein, because due to the Leptin effect (You remember Leptin, right? Because up to 50% of calories in your diet from healthy fat is good for you, and quite frankly, it is very difficult to consume that much healthy fat in your diet. Unless you’re eating lard out of the bucket with an ice cream scoop, you shouldn’t have to restrict your good fat consumption at all. Since you are not eating any starchy vegetables or carbs (including sugar, sweeteners, and alcohol), your only risk of eating too much carbs comes from possibly eating too much fruit. If you limit your fruit consumption to half a cup to a cup a day, it doesn’t matter how many non-starchy vegetables you eat, so long as you eat your protein and fat you simply cannot stuff your tummy with too many vegetables to make you fat. Follow this simple recipe for success and you will keep your Protein-Fat-Carb ratio in good order. For the geeks among you who REALLY want to know and who want to be super precise, let’s geek out here. Let’s say you are a 140 pound woman and your body fat percentage is 20%. If we do the math, that means you have 28 pounds of body fat, and 112 pounds remaining of lean body mass. With this lean body mass, you should aim for 112 grams of protein a day. more...



See how many carbs, proteins, and fats you need to look

I eat 500-900 cal / day but Never lost any significant weight 1 Kg that comes and goes . I am eating around 1200 calories now (I used to have 50 at most and abuse substances to try help) but I seem to just be putting weight on. I have been now focusing on protein levels and started taking shakes. I was just wondering if yo have any extra tips to help lose fat but regain muscle and look nice. I have been trying to loose weight now for 3 years and nothing has helped I am 31 and 209 lbs. Hello need some help please I'm 36 years old and 6'0 tall weight 320 I want to build muscle mass but trying to stay the same weight. What do u think on how much carbs and protein do I need for a day! I Want to build muscle mass and loose fat at the same time. I am trying to build muscle using P 90 X 3 and have incorporated running in lieu of the cardio with the program. I am also trying to lean out, not lose weight per se, but look more cut and hike up the booty! Hey I'm trying to burn fat and build muscle at the same time my main focus for muscle building Is my booty. I am 5'1 207 lbs, yes I know I am overweight and I have been working at for the last couple of years off and on. Can you give me the correct information as to how many calories, carbs, proteins, and fats I should intake to help me lose weight. Do you have a weight gain, muscle gain eating plan? more...



Protein and carbs - get the balance right - BBC Good Food

Protein and carbs - get the balance right. However, losing carbs from your diet completely can be detrimental to health. However, carbohydrates are the body's preferred source of energy, and our brains, in particular, need carbs to maintain alertness and concentration. High-protein diets put an extra load on the kidneys and may cause calcium to be lost from your bones. Protein and carbs both play a part in helping you shed extra pounds. So when are the best times to eat carbs and protein, what should your portion size be and what are your guideline daily amounts? more...



How to Calculate the Proper Protein and Carb Balance

How to Calculate the Proper Protein and Carb Balance. The Institute of Medicine has established minimum recommended dietary allowances, or RDAs, for protein and carbohydrates. Protein RDAs are 46 grams per day for women, 56 grams per day for men and 71 grams each day for pregnant and nursing women. Regardless of the protein and carb balance that’s appropriate for your individual needs, aim to consume at least the RDA for protein and carbs each day. The Institute of Medicine has also established acceptable macronutrient distribution ranges, or AMDRs, for carbohydrates and protein. For a 2,000-calorie diet, this means consuming 225 to 325 grams of carbs and 50 to 175 grams of protein each day. For example, an effective 1,200-calorie weight-loss diet may contain 140 grams of carbohydrates, 70 grams of protein and 40 grams of fat. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics reports that endurance athletes require 2.3 to 5.5 grams of carbohydrates for each pound of body weight and 0.5 to 0.9 grams of protein per pound of body weight each day. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics also recommends that strength-trained athletes consume 2.3 to 3.6 grams of carbohydrates per pound of body weight and 0.6 to 0.8 grams of protein per pound of body weight every day. more...



Calorie Intake, Fat, Carb and Protein Breakdown and Weight

A healthy diet is one with enough calories to meet your daily energy needs, and a balanced intake of fat, carbs and protein. The USDA estimates for a moderately active woman between the ages of 19 and 30 are about 2,000 to 2,200 calories each day. A sedentary woman of the same age requires 1,800 to 2,000 calories and an active 19- to 30-year-old needs about 2,400 calories. A moderately active woman between 31 and 50 needs 2,000 calories a day, while sedentary and active women of the same age need about 1,800 and 2,200 calories a day. Moderately active women over 50 need about 1,800 calories each day, while sedentary and active women over 50 need about 1,600 and 2,100 calories each day, respectively. Multiply your BMR by the number 1.2 if you are sedentary, 1.375 if lightly active, 1.55 if moderately active, 1.725 if very active and 1.9 if you are extra active. You can lose about 1 pound of body fat each week if you cut 500 calories from your diet each day. To determine the number of calories you need each day to lose 1 pound each week, simply estimate or calculate your caloric needs and then subtract 500. Regardless of total caloric intake, you need the same relative percentage of fat, carbs and protein. According to the IOM, adult women need to consume 20 to 35 percent of their calories from fat, 45 to 65 percent from carbohydrates and 10 to 35 percent from protein. If you are a moderately active woman between 19 and 30 and you want to lose 1 pound each week, you would then need about 480 calories from fat each day, 800 from carbs and 320 from protein. more...



What is a Healthy Carb Protein Fat Ratio

What is a Healthy Carb Protein Fat Ratio? People disagree on what the proper ratio is, but most agree it is 40-45% carbohydrates or carbs, 25-30% protein and 30-35% fat each day. With that in mind, you should eat carbs that are high in fiber to slow the rush of sugar to the blood stream. If eaten in excess, simple carbs will be stored as fat in the body. Carbs supply much needed energy to the heart, brain and kidneys which is why they play a prominent role in the healthy carb protein fat ratio. Our bodies will attempt to remove the carbs from our muscles, causing muscle loss. Three to four of these portions will provide 60-80 grams (2.1 to 2.8 ounces) of the protein needed each day. Fats break down into the good, the bad and the ugly. The really horrible fats are trans-fats which should be avoided entirely. Saturated fats are not as heart healthy as mono-unsaturated or polyunsaturated fats, but they are important and as much as 10% of your fat intake can come from saturated fats. Whenever we examine what we should be eating we should be looking for a healthy carb protein fat ratio. more...



You May not Need the Post - Workout Carbs After All

One thing we hear about from supplement companies and people at the gym is the ratio of carbohydrates to protein you need to take after a workout. If you don’t get that insulin spike you won’t be absorbing and using the protein in your meal to build muscle, right? Did primitive man get just the right balance of carbs to protein after a hunt , which was his workout? So the researchers took our commonplace wisdom and compared two groups, one that consumed carbs and protein in a 2 to 1 ratio and the other that consumed only protein. At first, the individuals who consumed the carbohydrates with their protein had an insulin spike along with their hyperglycemia (increase in blood sugar), which should be a surprise to no one. Those eating protein alone had just as much of it in their muscle as those who used the golden 2:1 ratio. While experiencing no insulin spike, the protein only group absorbed and utilized just as much as the carb and protein group. Another important thing to note is that the latter group had taken in three times the calories that the protein only group had. And yet there was no difference in the potential for muscle building. It’s possible that for athletes doing more than one workout in a day the extra speed of absorption featured by taking in a 2 to 1 ratio of carbs to protein post-workout is a good idea. more...



The Protein, Fat and Carbohydrate Ratio for Losing Weight

The Protein, Fat and Carbohydrate Ratio for Losing Weight. About the Protein, Fat and Carbohydrate Ratio. To be clear, ratios, such as 3-to-1 or 2-to-1, are not used when determining how much protein, fat and carbohydrate you should eat to lose weight, but percentages often are. The participants were assigned to one of four diets with varying percentages of fat, protein and carbs, and were followed for two years. The researchers found that weight loss, hunger control and diet satisfaction was similar - no matter which diet the participant followed. The authors concluded that calorie-restriction resulted in weight loss, regardless of the breakdown of protein, fat and carbohydrates. While the NEJM study reported no difference in weight loss with the different macronutrient ratios, some evidence exists that getting more protein in your diet may be helpful when you're trying to lose weight. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans offers a range of protein for overall good health: 10 percent to 35 percent. For weight loss, you may benefit from getting a higher percentage of your calories from protein. Like protein and carbs, you have no one specific amount of fat to reduce to lose weight. The Dietary Guidelines suggest 20 percent to 35 percent of calories from fat for overall good healt. However, when you're trying to lose weight, keeping to the lower end of the range is wise for calorie control. While it's a good idea to know how much protein, carbs and fat to include in your diet, what really matters when you're trying to drop extra pounds is the quality of the foods you eat. Eating the right portion of food, even the healthy ones, is also necessary for keeping calories under control for weight loss. more...



Shape : Protein, Carbs and Fat : What You Should be Eating

Protein, Carbs, and Fat: What You Should be Eating. With all the conflicting advice these days about what you should be eating, it’s hard not to have diet whiplash. A recent avalanche of news, however, is finally all pointing in the same direction—toward a moderate, eminently doable regimen that divides your daily intake evenly among three food groups: carbohydrates, protein, and fats. “When you skimp on one group like protein, you tend to compensate by overeating something else you don’t need any more of, like additional carbs or fat.” A recent study in the journal PLo S ONE confirmed that pattern. When people lowered their daily intake of protein by as little as 5 percent and made up the difference with carbohydrate-rich foods, they consumed an additional 260 calories a day. “When you fill your plate with a balanced medley of nutrient-rich foods, you’ll end up feeling physically and emotionally satisfied,” she says. more...



How to discover how many carbs, proteins, and fats you

And you have to be psychologically strong to lose weight. I lost 100 pound and I know that. I tried exercising as well and adding fat burners but they didn't help much. Anyway, my question is simply this - do we need to pay that much attention to the ratios (carbohydrates, protein and fat)? I've read this article healthiack.com that simply suggests "eat 20% less than you normally would" (20% less than the "maintenance" intake) and you should be fine. Unfortunately, I'm gaining more weight and was recently told that I am pre-diabetic. What would you say is the best carb, protien, fat ratio when trying to maintain and even get a bigger butt, while flattening the stomach. I have gained weight and would like to keep some of the body mass I've gained in my hips and butt while reducing my waist. I have your information for exercising, but I was wondering what ratio I should be using to build muscle, tone and tighten my legs and butt, while also losing fat in my stomach. The FACT with me and my exemple is this: So i say that it's very HARD to keep our GOOD BMI (my old 142 lbs) and reduce our BAD Body Fat Percentage (i reduced 3,7%) at the same time because since i started to have a healthy life style i lost fat BUT AT THE SAME TIME i reduced my BMI (witch i never wanted to) So if i'm trying to lose weight you recomend the Natural shake with no artificial flavours and sweetners, BUT i eat more calories per serving in that Natural one, than if i take the standard with artificial stuff and sugars. How can i keep my BMI (weight) and reduce my body fat percentage to 8%? Depends on your goal so if trying to lose weight I would go with the one that has no artificial flavours and sweetners (which may cause you to have cravings making you eat too much and gain weight) more...



Diet Talk : Protein, fat, carb ratio

Posted: 25 Mar 2010, 09:11. I am very confused on the ratio of protein, fat, and carb intake. Posted: 25 Mar 2010, 09:23. PATIENCE is a virtue, and will keep you motivated.remember this is not a diet but learning a new way of eating for the rest of our lives. Posted: 25 Mar 2010, 09:54. Posted: 25 Mar 2010, 18:28. Posted: 25 Mar 2010, 18:43. Posted: 25 Mar 2010, 18:56. Posted: 26 Mar 2010, 14:52. Posted: 26 Mar 2010, 15:15. Posted: 26 Mar 2010, 15:37. more...




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