New Fda Drug For Weight Loss


Qnexa weight loss - NRX HEALTH

Qnexa / Qsymia is not available for prescription now but if approved by the FDA, you could be prescribed and be able to buy Qnexa soon. Read on for the FDA Approval status on the anti-obesity prescription drug Qnexa / Qsymia on Tuesday, July 17th, 2012. So they are looking for an easier weight loss solution that isn’t quite as demanding on their time and their energy so the popularity and hype surrounding this newly approved prescription weight loss pills comes as no surprise. There is no need for people to keep waiting for the prescription drug Qnexa. There is a study that reveals the similarities of Qnexa / Qsymia to other prescription weight loss pills and that they can increase the chances of heart attacks and strokes (from heart palpitations). It is the first prescription weight loss drug to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration in over 10 years. Now, complementing this with Phen Tabz helps to speed up the weight loss process safely and effectively without the negative side effects that come with anti-obesity drugs that require a prescription. There is no comparison available between the possible side effects of such weight reduction foods and weight loss pills like Qnexa (Qsymia). We already know that Phentermine also poses some undesirable side effects and weight loss effects are only for the short term. It has been over 13 years since the FDA has approved a prescription diet weight loss pill so it remains to be seen how the FDA will Qnexa / Qsymia. Those that are approved for prescription are only short term weight loss solutions including this pending approval for Qnexa by the FDA. Remember that even with approval from the FDA, Qnexa is still only for short term weight loss and will still require a doctor’s visit and assessment on whether the patient can take it or not. Today, Tuesday, July 17th, 2012 the FDA has approved the prescription weight loss drug Qnexa (renamed Qsymia) and limited it to highly obese patients with a body mass index of over 27 or more (BMI of 30 or greater). Please keep in mind that there are pharmacological products on the market that are safer and effective for weight loss and appetite suppression that DO NOT require a prescription like Phen Tabz . Phen Tabz : Qnexa alternatives without a prescription and without the negative side effects! more...



FDA approves a third new weight - loss pill - Detroit Free Press

To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs. For the third time in about two years, the Food and Drug Administration has approved a new weight-loss pill. All of the new drugs work by decreasing appetite and all have some side effects and drawbacks, though they differ. In Belviq’s studies for the FDA, average losses were 3% to 3.7% over placebo; for Qsymia, average losses were 6.7% to 8.9% over placebo. “The ideal candidate for a drug to treat obesity is someone who uses the drug as a tool, along with diet and exercise,” says Tsai, who has no ties with drug makers. So far, the other new pills have not been big sellers – considering that more than a third of U. Adults, 78.6 million, are obese, according the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Patients filled about 138,000 prescriptions for Qsymia in the second quarter of 2014, according to drug maker Vivus Inc. Prescription numbers for Belviq were about 110,000 in the same period, according to Arena Pharmaceuticals Inc., which makes the drug. That’s a lot of room for growth, he says, and having a third drug approved just “gets more voices out there” talking about the pharmaceutical options. In the past, some obesity drugs have been linked to serious heart problems and pulled from the market. The makers of Contrave, Belviq and Qsymia have all agreed to conduct long-term heart safety studies and report the results to FDA. more...



FDA Approves New Weight - Loss Drug Contrave - NBC News

FDA Approves New Weight-Loss Drug Contrave. Regulators are greenlighting a new weight-loss drug called Contrave, the third in a string of approvals for anti-obesity treatments. The Food and Drug Administration said Thursday that it is approved for use by people who have a body mass index of 30 or higher, which is considered to be obese, and for people with a BMI of 27 or higher who also have a weight-related medical condition such as diabetes. Contrave is a combination of two drugs that are already approved, naltrexone and bupropion. The combination pill joins two similar drugs from Arena Pharmaceuticals and Vivus Inc., which FDA approved in 2012 after a 13-year drought of new prescription weight-loss medicines. Patients on Contrave for a year lost 4.2 percent more weight than patients taking a dummy pill. more...



FDA approves weight - management drug Qsymia

Food and Drug Administration today approved Qsymia (phentermine and topiramate extended-release) as an addition to a reduced-calorie diet and exercise for chronic weight management. “Qsymia, used responsibly in combination with a healthy lifestyle that includes a reduced-calorie diet and exercise, provides another treatment option for chronic weight management in Americans who are obese or are overweight and have at least one weight-related comorbid condition.” The safety and efficacy of Qsymia were evaluated in two randomized, placebo-controlled trials that included approximately 3,700 obese and overweight patients with and without significant weight-related conditions treated for one year. The recommended daily dose of Qsymia contains 7.5 milligrams of phentermine and 46 mg of topiramate extended-release. Qsymia is also available at a higher dose (15 mg phentermine and 92 mg of topiramate extended-release) for select patients. Results from the two trials show that after one year of treatment with the recommended and highest daily dose of Qsymia, patients had an average weight loss of 6.7 percent and 8.9 percent, respectively, over treatment with placebo. Approximately 62 percent and 69 percent of patients lost at least five percent of their body weight with the recommended dose and highest dose of Qsymia, respectively, compared with about 20 percent of patients treated with placebo. Patients who did not lose at least three percent of their body weight by week 12 of treatment with Qsymia were unlikely to achieve and sustain weight loss with continued treatment at this dose. If after 12 weeks on the higher dose of Qsymia, a patient does not lose at least five percent of body weight, then Qsymia should be discontinued, as these patients are unlikely to achieve clinically meaningful weight loss with continued treatment. Therefore, the use of Qsymia in patients with recent (within the last six months) or unstable heart disease or stroke is not recommended. Regular monitoring of heart rate is recommended for all patients taking Qsymia, especially when starting Qsymia or increasing the dose. The purpose of the REMS is to educate prescribers and their patients about the increased risk of birth defects associated with first trimester exposure to Qsymia, the need for pregnancy prevention, and the need to discontinue therapy if pregnancy occurs. more...



New FDA Approved Weight Loss Drug Now Available

Qsymia is the first weight loss drug approved by the FDA in 13 years. Eva Cwynar says the drug “makes the stomach feel like it’s got enough food in there.” The drug is now available at retail pharmacies by prescription. “When I gained all the weight. This year, he finally decided that he wanted to lose the weight for good. They worked out a diet and exercise plan and used a new tool that recently became available  -  the first weight loss drug approved by the FDA in 13 years - called Qsymia . Cwynar said, “It makes the stomach feel like it’s got enough food in there.” “Normal Phenteramine on the market is 37 milligram, this has a 3 milligram as a starter dose. So it’s a fraction of what’s out there, and it doesn’t have the agitation, or the cardiac effects,” Dr. “The majority of patients that I put on this drug have absolutely no side effects.”   Brown says he has felt no side effects from the drug at all. “I feel rejuvenated, and I’m off in a whole new direction,” he said, “I’m excited for the new direction of life.” more...



Obesity pill Belviq : FDA approves first long

Obesity pill Belviq: FDA approves first long-term prescription weight loss drug in 13 years. The Food and Drug Administration has approved the first new prescription drug for long-term weight loss into the U. Long wait: The anti-obesity pill Belviq is the first new prescription drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration in over a decade. Obesity rates nearing 35 per cent of the adult population, many doctors have called on the FDA to approve new weight loss treatments. The cocktail of phentermine and fenfluramine was a popular weight loss combination prescribed by doctors, though it was never approved by FDA. Obesity rates are near 35 per cent of the adult population stressing doctors to encourage the FDA to approve new weight loss treatments. Effects: The FDA said patients should stop taking Belviq after three months if they fail to lose 5 per cent of their body weight as positive results are then not expected. The FDA said patients should stop taking Belviq after three months if they fail to lose 5 percent of their body weight. Patients are unlikely to see any significant weight loss by staying with the drug. Side effects with the drug include depression, migraine and memory lapses. more...



FDA Approves Weight - Loss Drug, Saxenda : Health

(Photo : Pixabay/ mojzagrebinfo) Out of the participants who were on the drug, 62 percent had lost at least five percent of their body weight. Out of the participants who were on the drug, 62 percent had lost at least five percent of their body weight. In the placebo group, only 34 percent of the people lost at least five percent of their body weight. In the other trial, researchers found that type 2 diabetics had an average weight loss of nearly four percent after one year. Out of the people who received Saxenda, 49 percent of them lost at least five percent of their body weight. In the placebo group, only 16 percent achieved similar weight loss results. Patients who do not lose at least four percent of their body weight should not continue taking the medication. more...



New weight - loss drug Saxenda wins FDA approval

The agency on Tuesday approved Saxenda (liraglutide) for adults who are obese or for those who are overweight and have at least one weight-related health condition, such as high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes or high cholesterol. Patients taking the drug, made by Novo Nordisk, should still follow a low-calorie diet and exercise regularly, the FDA noted. Three clinical trials assessed the safety and effectiveness of the drug for weight loss. Of the people treated with the drug, 62 percent lost at least 5 percent of their body weight. The FDA added that patients should be examined to determine if Saxenda is working after 16 weeks of treatment. Those who do not lose at least 4 percent of their body weight by that time should stop taking the medication, the FDA said. Patients who experience a prolonged increase in their resting heart rate should stop taking Saxenda, the FDA added. Tumors of the thyroid gland were associated with Saxenda treatment in rodent studies. Patients who have been diagnosed with MTC or have a family history of the condition should not take Saxenda. Patients with a condition known as multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 2, which increases the risk for MTC, should also not take Saxenda, the agency said. The FDA has also required that additional studies involving Saxenda investigate the safety and effectiveness of the drug in children, including how it could affect growth and development. more...



Three new weight - loss drugs : Will they work

Weight-loss drugs are appropriate only as an addition to - not a replacement for - diet and exercise, doctors say. 3 new diet drugs in the pipeline: Qnexa, lorcaserin, Contrave. ( Health.com ) - Here's the good news: Three new weight-loss drugs are on the horizon that could help overweight and obese people shed pounds. A Food and Drug Administration panel is meeting on Thursday to discuss one of the drugs, Qnexa, and the panel is scheduled to consider two more drugs, lorcaserin and Contrave, in the coming months. The new weight-loss drugs aren't intended for chubby people who want to look better in a bathing suit. In clinical trials, roughly 60 percent to 70 percent of the people who took Qnexa lost 5 percent or more of their body weight (a standard measure used in weight-loss drug studies), compared with about 15 percent to 20 percent of those who took a placebo. Qnexa contains lower doses of phentermine than Fen-Phen did, however, and an FDA review of Qnexa noted that the "fen" part of the drug, fenfluramine, is believed to have been responsible for the heart valve problems. Two drugs, Pondimin and Redux, were yanked from the market in 1997 for the same reason as Fen-Phen (both contained forms of fenfluramine), and in 2007, a drug called rimonabant that had yet to be approved in the U. The new weight-loss drugs are trying to address the safety concerns that sunk previous drugs by taking a different approach. The third drug, Contrave, combines two drugs already approved by the FDA to fight addiction: naltrexone and bupropion. Weight-loss drugs are appropriate only as an addition to - not a replacement for - diet and exercise, Ryan says. more...



FDA Approves First New Weight - Loss Drug In More Than A

Belviq, the first new prescription drug in years to help people lose weight, is expected to be available in four to six months. For the first time in 13 years, the Food and Drug Administration has approved a new drug to help people lose weight. "The approval of this drug, used responsibly in combination with a healthy diet and lifestyle, provides a treatment option for Americans who are obese or are overweight and have at least one weight-related comorbid condition." The drug was approved for obese people (those with a body mass index of 30 or more) and overweight people with a BMI of 27 or more who also have at least one weight-related health condition, such as high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes or high cholesterol. The FDA had rejected the drug in 2010 after a panel of experts advised the agency to give it a thumbs down because of safety concerns. Early studies indicated the drug might cause tumors in rats and possibly heart problems in people. But the company submitted new data aimed at alleviating those concerns, and the same panel endorsed approval in May. The FDA hasn't approved a new weight-loss drug since Orlistat came on the market in 1999. The once-popular weight-loss drug Meridia was pulled from the market in 2010 because of concerns about heart attacks and strokes. The FDA had rejected Qnexa in 2010 because of concerns about heart problems and birth defects. Qnexa is a combination of two drugs that are already on the market: phentermine, a stimulant used for short periods to help control weight, and topiramate, which is used for migraines and seizures. more...



Anti - obesity medication - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Orlistat (Xenical) the most commonly used medication to treat obesity and sibutramine (Meridia) a medication that was recently withdrawn due to cardiovascular side effects. [1] The main treatment modalities for overweight and obese individuals remain dieting and physical exercise . Because of potential side effects , it is recommended that anti-obesity drugs only be prescribed for obesity where it is hoped that the benefits of the treatment outweigh its risks. Current and potential anti-obesity drugs may operate through one or more of the following mechanisms: It was not until the 1920s and 1930s that new treatments began to appear. [13] Fen-phen was born and rapidly became the most commonly prescribed diet medication. Dexfenfluramine (Redux) was developed in the mid-1990s as an alternative to fenfluramine with less side-effects, and received regulatory approval in 1996. Ephedra was removed from the US market in 2004 over concerns that it raises blood pressure and could lead to strokes and death. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a revised label for Xenical to include new safety information about cases of severe liver injury that have been reported rarely with the use of this medication. In the past, it was noted by the US that Meridia was a harmless drug for fighting obesity. The combination of phentermine and topiramate , brand name Qsymia (formerly Qnexa) was approved by the U. Unresearched nonprescription products or programs for weight loss are heavily promoted by mail and print advertising and on the internet. [44] A similar medication designed for patients with Type 2 diabetes is Acarbose; which partially blocks absorption of carbohydrates in the small intestine, and produces similar side effects including stomach pain and flatulence. The limitation of - or knowledge gap concerning - drugs for obesity is that we do not fully understand the neural basis of appetite and how to modulate it. This was a novel combination of an inhibitor and a polymer designed to bind the undigested triglycerides therefore allowing increased fat expulsion without side effects such as oily stools that occur with orlistat. more...



Qsymia

Your weight loss may vary depending on your BMI, diet, activity, dose of Qsymia, and other factors.1,2. Qsymia is an FDA-approved prescription weight-loss medicine that can work with diet and activity to help you lose 20 pounds or more and lose 4 inches or more off your waist. See your doctor now and ask for Qsymia. If you take Qsymia during pregnancy, your baby has a higher risk for birth defects called cleft lip and cleft palate. If you become pregnant while taking Qsymia, stop taking Qsymia immediately, and tell your healthcare provider right away. Your healthcare provider should check your heart rate while you take Qsymia. Your healthcare provider should do a blood test to measure the level of acid in your blood before and during your treatment with Qsymia. You should check your blood sugar before you start taking Qsymia and while you take Qsymia. If you are taking medicines for your blood pressure, your doctor may need to adjust these medicines while taking Qsymia. Your healthcare provider will tell you how to stop taking Qsymia slowly. These are not all of the possible side effects of Qsymia. more...



FDA Approves Diet Pill Belviq

June 27, 2012 - For the first time in more than a decade, the FDA has approved a new drug to help people lose weight . Today, Arena Pharmaceuticals' Belviq (lorcaserin hydrochloride) became the first prescription weight loss drug approved by federal regulators in 13 years. The FDA approved Belviq as an addition to a reduced-calorie diet and exercise , for use in chronic weight control . more...



Newly Approved Weight Loss Drugs - Can They Help You

However, when weight loss medications are combined with diet and exercise, as they should be, an added benefit may be seen. A low-fat diet and regular exercise are part of the weight-loss regimen that should be continued even if weight loss medicines are stopped. Update: The New Weight Loss Drugs Qsymia, Belviq and Contrave. In 2012, the FDA approved the first two new weight loss drugs in 13 years - Qsymia by Vivus Pharmaceuticals and Belviq by Arena Pharmaceuticals. Like Qsymia, the safety of taking Belviq with other weight loss drugs is not known. Alli should be used in conjunction with diet and regular exercise to promote weight loss. Drugs that are considered stimulant weight loss drugs include phentermine ( Adipex-P ), phendimetrazine ( Bontril SR ) and diethylpropion . These are controlled substances approved for short-term use in weight loss - usually only up to 12 weeks - because these drugs can lead to abuse and dependence with long-term use. As with other weight loss treatments, these drugs should be used in conjunction with diet and exercise to maintain weight loss. In contrast, Alli, Contrave, Belviq, and Qsymia are all approved for long-term use in weight loss. Are OTC Herbal Weight Loss Pills Safe and Effective? more...



BELVIQ CIV

Pregnancy: Do not take BELVIQ if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, as weight loss offers no potential benefit during pregnancy and BELVIQ may harm your unborn baby. Before taking BELVIQ, tell your doctor if you have or have had heart problems. Painful erections: If you have an erection lasting more than 4 hours while on BELVIQ, stop taking BELVIQ and call your doctor or go to the nearest emergency room right away. Decreases in blood cell count: BELVIQ may cause your red and white blood cell counts to decrease. Increase in prolactin: BELVIQ may increase the amount of a hormone called prolactin. For more information about BELVIQ®, talk to your doctor and see the full Product Information . Not valid for prescriptions for BELVIQ reimbursed in full by any third-party payer. Patients and pharmacies are responsible for disclosing to insurance carriers the redemption and value of the card and complying with any other conditions imposed by insurance carriers or third-party payers. The value of this card is not contingent on any prior or future purchases. The card is solely intended to provide savings on any purchase of BELVIQ. Use of the card for any 1 purchase does not obligate the patient to make future purchases of BELVIQ or any other product. Please be advised that the personal information you provide will be used to satisfy your request to receive or activate a trial voucher or savings card. The marketer of BELVIQ, Eisai Inc. Please do not submit any personal information unless you have read and agree with the terms of that Privacy Policy. Does not endorse and is not responsible for the content included on the site you are about to enter. more...



New weight - loss drug available

Weight-loss drug Belviq is now available by prescription for overweight or obese patients. A new drug, Belviq, is available to overweight and obese patients. The drug received FDA approval nearly a year ago. The FDA approved Belviq, an oral medication, in June 2012. Belviq, as the FDA pointed out in its statement announcing approval last year, is intended "as an addition to a reduced-calorie diet and exercise." Patients in clinical trials went from an average 227 pounds to 204 pounds on Qsymia; on Belviq, the average weight dropped from 220 to 207. In trials, 47% of patients without Type 2 diabetes lost at least 5% of their body weight on Belviq, according to the FDA. In people with Type 2 diabetes, 38% of patients on Belviq lost at least 5% of their body weight, compared with 16% on a placebo. The most common side effects of Belviq in nondiabetic patients included headache, dizziness and fatigue, according to the FDA. more...



New Diet Drugs Hit the Market - ABC News

With more than 36 percent of American adults now classified as obese according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the numbers still climbing, doctors are clamoring for more pharmaceuticals to treat their patients. But even as doctors have begun scribbling prescriptions for these new weight loss medications, many dieters remember the long and checkered past of diet drugs in this country. Some drugs that were originally viewed as rock stars for weight loss and appetite control were ultimately pulled off the market after it was found they posed serious health risks. "Once people stopped losing weight they would take more and more of the pills, and this left some feeling racy and agitated with a rapid pulse and high blood pressure," said Dr. By the 1970s, the FDA limited its use for weight loss to short-term treatment only. Riding the wave of the supplement's popularity a similar drug named dexfenfluramine and marketed as Redux was quickly approved by the FDA in 1996. Approved in 1997, the drug was found during clinical trials to increase heart rate and blood pressure. The drug's risks proved not to be worth the benefits: Studies found a 16 percent increase of major cardiac events in patients taking Meridia compared with those who weren't taking the drug, with a negligible difference in weight loss. Done often enough, the drug is not as effective and weight loss is minimal. Belviq is approved for the obese and those who are overweight and have other serious health risks. In clinical trials, the average person lost 3 percent to 3.7 percent of his weight after taking Belviq for a year compared to those taking a placebo. The FDA said patients should stop taking Belviq if they fail to lose 5 percent of their body weight after three months of use. Patients are unlikely to see any significant weight loss by staying on the drug, the agency said. About half of the 4,430 overweight and obese patients in the Qsymia studies on the recommended dosage lost an average of 10 percent of their weight in the first year of taking the drug. We are talking about taking a pill to fix what's busted - the circuitry of the brain that misreads the signals of appetite, fat storage and other factors. more...



FDA - Approved Weight Loss Treatments

Patients recharge the device at home, and physicians tailor the strength of the electric signals to a patient's needs. In clinical trials, two groups of obese patients received the device, but researchers only turned it on in one group. The FDA also approved Vyvanse as the first and only drug to treat binge-eating disorder—a psychological diagnosis characterized by frequent episodes of overeating and associated feelings of shame. Binge-eating is the most common eating disorder in the United States, and two-thirds of binge-eaters are obese. In at least one trial , a 50 mg and a 70 mg dose of Vyvanse significantly reduced the number of weekly binge-eating episodes. According to a 2013 study , an average dose of Vyvvanse leads to weight loss and an improved BMI for patients with bipolar disorder. Not all the news is sunny with Vyvanse, warn experts. "Substance abuse is a concern and is often linked with binge-eating disorder," says Guarda. more...



FDA approves a third new weight - loss pill - USA TODAY

For the third time in about two years, the Food and Drug Administration has approved a new weight loss pill. FDA approves a third new weight-loss pill For the third time in about two years, the Food and Drug Administration has approved a new weight loss pill. To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs. FDA has approved a new weight loss pill, the third in about two years. For the third time in about two years, the Food and Drug Administration has approved a new weight-loss pill. All of the new drugs work by decreasing appetite and all have some side effects and drawbacks, though they differ. In Belviq's studies for the FDA, average losses were 3% to 3.7% over placebo; for Qsymia, average losses were 6.7% to 8.9% over placebo. "The ideal candidate for a drug to treat obesity is someone who uses the drug as a tool, along with diet and exercise," says Tsai, who has no ties with drug makers. Adults, 78.6 million, are obese, according the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Patients filled about 138,000 prescriptions for Qsymia in the second quarter of 2014, according to drug maker Vivus Inc. Prescription numbers for Belviq were about 110,000 in the same period, according to Arena Pharmaceuticals Inc., which makes the drug. That's a lot of room for growth, he says, and having a third drug approved just "gets more voices out there" talking about the pharmaceutical options. In the past, some obesity drugs have been linked to serious heart problems and pulled from the market. The makers of Contrave, Belviq and Qsymia have all agreed to conduct long-term heart safety studies and report the results to FDA. more...



Contrave, Newest Weight Loss Option : FAQ

11, 2014 - The FDA's approval on Wednesday of a new prescription weight loss pill offers yet another option for the more than one-third of American adults who are obese. Called Contrave, the new drug is the third prescription weight loss drug to be approved by the FDA since 2012. Contrave combines two drugs already on the market: bupropion ( Wellbutrin ), an antidepressant , and naltrexone , an anti- addiction drug. Weight loss experts say all three drugs work in similar ways, but they welcome Contrave as yet another option, especially since not all weight loss drugs work the same for everyone. The FDA approval came after the agency looked at new information it requested from the drug's maker in 2011 to be sure the drug was safe for the heart . How the combination works for weight loss is not entirely understood, even by experts. more...



Weight - loss drug Contrave wins FDA approval on second try

Weight-loss drug Contrave wins FDA approval on second try. The FDA gave a green light to Contrave, the third weight-loss drug to win approval from the agency. New diet drug Contrave is to be used along with reduced-calorie diet and physical activity, FDA says. Food and Drug Administration announced the approval Wednesday of the new weight-loss drug Contrave, a mix of antidepressant and alcohol dependence medications. Of La Jolla, combines the drugs naltrexone, which is used to treat alcohol and opioid dependence, and the drug bupropion, which is prescribed for depression, seasonal affective disorder and smoking cessation. more...



New Weight Loss Drug Approved By FDA : Compare Diet Pills

New Weight Loss Drug Approved By FDA: Compare Diet Pills, Diets, And Supplements. Just in time for those New Year’s weight loss resolutions, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a new weight loss drug . The FDA emphasized that patients who use the weight loss drug should diet and exercise for optimal results. However, the FDA recommends that physicians evaluate patients after 16 weeks on Saxenda. If they have not lost four percent of their body weight, they should end the treatment. And, although appetite reduction is considered one of the benefits of Saxenda, the loss of appetite is listed among the side effects. For those who want to jump-start weight loss and aren’t in the category for whom the prescription medication is designed, new studies have shown that short-term rapid weight loss diets can be effective. However, the former President initially credited a vegan diet for helping him heal from his heart attack and lose weight, as he discusses below. After years of few prescription options for weight loss , the FDA has now approved four drugs since 2012, reported Web MD. The FDA recommends halting treatment if patients have not lost five percent of their weight after 12 weeks. The FDA suggests ending the prescription if you have not lost five percent of your weight within 12 weeks. The FDA suggests that if patients have not lost three percent of their weight after 12 weeks, physicians increase the dosage. However, more than 90 percent reported that the supplements did not work. more...



Prescription Weight Loss / Diet Pills : What Are the Options

Prescription Weight Loss / Diet Pills: What Are the Options? Prescription weight loss pills, also called anti-obesity drugs or “diet pills”, are sometimes prescribed to a patient as an additional tool in the treatment for weight loss . Weight loss drugs should not be used as a substitute for healthful eating and a regular exercise program. Most weight loss drugs that suppress the appetite are known as anorexiants . Common "Diet Pills" or Weight Loss Drugs. How Effective are Weight Loss Drugs? Weight loss drugs may not work for everyone. Who are Candidates for Weight Loss Drugs? However, prescription weight loss drugs should be used in addition to diet and exercise. Weight loss drugs should not be used during pregnancy. All weight loss drugs fall under pregnancy category X and are contraindicated in pregnancy. more...



FDA Approves New Weight - Loss Drug

Saxenda cleared for use by adults who are obese or overweight and have at least one weight-related condition. The agency on Tuesday approved Saxenda (liraglutide) for adults who are obese or for those who are overweight and have at least one weight-related health condition, such as high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes or high cholesterol. Patients taking the drug, made by Novo Nordisk, should still follow a low-calorie diet and exercise regularly, the FDA noted. Three clinical trials assessed the safety and effectiveness of the drug for weight loss. The trials involved roughly 4,800 obese and overweight people with and without other weight-related conditions. Of the people treated with the drug, 62 percent lost at least 5 percent of their body weight. The FDA added that patients should be examined to determine if Saxenda is working after 16 weeks of treatment. Those who do not lose at least 4 percent of their body weight by that time should stop taking the medication, the FDA said. The most common side effects associated with Saxenda included nausea, diarrhea, constipation, vomiting, low blood sugar and loss of appetite. Patients who experience a prolonged increase in their resting heart rate should stop taking Saxenda, the FDA added. Tumors of the thyroid gland were associated with Saxenda treatment in rodent studies. Patients who have been diagnosed with MTC or have a family history of the condition should not take Saxenda. Patients with a condition known as multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 2, which increases the risk for MTC, should also not take Saxenda, the agency said. The FDA has also required that additional studies involving Saxenda investigate the safety and effectiveness of the drug in children, including how it could affect growth and development. more...



Qsymia : FDA Approves Another New Diet Drug

On Tuesday, the Food and Drug Administration ( FDA ) approved Qsymia, the second new diet drug in a month, and the most effective of the weight-loss pills that the agency has considered in recent years. (MORE: A Brief History of Diet Pills and the FDA ) The drug is approved for obese adults with a body mass index, or BMI, of 30 or higher. Some doctors have already been prescribing the two drugs together for weight loss. In clinical trials, overweight and obese patients taking Qsymia for a year lost differing amounts of weight: on average, patients taking a middle dose of the drug lost 8.4% of their body weight; on a higher dose, patients lost 10.6%. Most of the weight came off in the first three months, so doctors should monitor patients at that point to see if the drug is working. The FDA notes that people who don’t lose at least 3% of their body weight by three months are unlikely to go on to lose any significant weight, so they should either be counseled to discontinue the drug or to try a higher dose (Qsymia will be available in two doses). If patients still don’t lose at least 5% of their weight after three additional months on the higher dose, they should quit taking Qsymia. The drug is designed to be used in conjunction with traditional weight-management strategies like diet and exercise. Doctors stress that because of the potential risks of the drug, dieters should not use the drug for cosmetic weight loss. It will also be available in specialized pharmacies that register for the right to sell the drug, where pharmacists have been educated about Qsymia’s risks and can pass that information along to patients and doctors. Safety concerns led the FDA to reject Qsymia’s first bid for approval in 2010, but the agency and Vivus have now put in place strategies to reduce risk: for example, women of child-bearing age who want to take Qsymia must test negative for pregnancy before starting the drug and are expected to use contraception and take a pregnancy test once a month while on the drug. People with recent or unstable heart disease or stroke are not recommended to take the drug because of the potential heart risks. Vivus has also agreed to continue monitoring Qsymia users for side effects after the drug reaches market; in particular, it will conduct a long-term cardiovascular outcomes trial to assess the effect of Qsymia on major events like heart attack and stroke. The FDA’s approval of Qsymia, after such a long diet-drug drought and despite the potential safety problems that plague weight-loss pills, marks a willingness to make new solutions available. more...



Weight - loss pill Belviq gets the OK from the FDA

Louis Aronne, director of the weight loss program at Weill-Cornell Medical College. Vivus Inc.'s Qnexa is thought to be the most promising of the drugs, achieving the most weight loss. Arena's studies showed that patients taking Belviq, known generically as lorcaserin, had modest weight loss. By comparison, average weight loss with Qnexa is 11 percent, with more than 83 percent of patients losing 5 percent of their weight or more. The FDA said patients should stop taking Belviq after three months if they fail to lose 5 percent of their body weight. Patients are unlikely to see any significant weight loss by staying with the drug. Side effects with the drug include depression, migraine and memory lapses. Experts say the challenge of weight loss drug development lies in safely turning off one of the body's fundamental directives: to eat enough food to maintain its current weight. Belviq is the first new prescription drug approved to treat obesity since Xenical's approval 13 years ago. more...



FDA approves weight - management drug Contrave

“When used as directed in combination with a healthy lifestyle that includes a reduced-calorie diet and exercise, Contrave provides another treatment option for chronic weight management for people who are obese or are overweight and have at least one weight-related health condition.” The effectiveness of Contrave was evaluated in multiple clinical trials that included approximately 4,500 obese and overweight patients with and without significant weight-related conditions treated for one year. In this trial, 42 percent of patients treated with Contrave lost at least 5 percent of their body weight compared with 17 percent of patients treated with placebo. In this trial, 36 percent of patients treated with Contrave lost at least 5 percent of their body weight compared with 18 percent of patients treated with placebo. If a patient has not lost at least 5 percent of baseline body weight, Contrave should be discontinued, as it is unlikely that the patient will achieve and sustain clinically meaningful weight loss with continued treatment. Because it contains bupropion, Contrave has a boxed warning to alert health care professionals and patients to the increased risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors associated with antidepressant drugs. Contrave can cause seizures and must not be used in patients who have seizure disorders. Contrave should be discontinued and not restarted in patients who experience a seizure while being treated with Contrave. Contrave can also raise blood pressure and heart rate and must not be used in patients with uncontrolled high blood pressure. Blood pressure and pulse should be measured prior to starting the drug and should be monitored at regular intervals, particularly among patients with controlled high blood pressure prior to treatment. Patients undergoing an abrupt discontinuation of alcohol, benzodiazepines, barbiturates and antiepileptic drugs should not take Contrave. A cardiovascular outcomes trial to assess the cardiovascular risk associated with Contrave use; A clinical trial to evaluate the potential for interactions between Contrave and other drugs. more...



FDA Reports Qnexa Safe and Effective - ABC News

An initial review has found the diet pill Qnexa to be safe and effective, according to a U. The FDA will more thoroughly review Thursday the efficacy and safety of Qnexa, one of three new weight-loss drugs . Experts hope Qnexa, and the other drugs, Lorcaserin and Contrave, will provide effective weight-loss without the dangerous side effects that doomed other drugs, such as Fen-phen, Meridia and Alli. "It's a combination of two drugs that have been on the market for many years." It was phenfluramine that was linked to the heart issues," Katz said. Fujioka said the trials for Qnexa, Lorcaserin and Contrave lasted about a year. "The new drugs seem safe, but so did the Fen-phen combo," he said. "It is difficult to believe the risk of memory loss and other neurological effects found with topimarate will provide adequate safe use," said Dr. Blackburn said if the drugs do end up on the market, they will target those who are obese and possibly morbidly obese. And given the grim history of many diet pills that have come and gone, many experts said they don't think the answer to the obesity epidemic can be found in a pill. "The more effective drugs are less safe, and the safer drugs are less effective," said Katz. "You can't just use the drug and say that's the secret to weight loss," said Besser. more...



FDA approves weight - loss drug, with a new name

Food and Drug Administration approved the new weight loss pill Qsymia on Tuesday, adding to a very skimpy arsenal of drugs Americans can take to battle severe obesity - and adding a last-minute name change after two years of wrangling over whether to approve the drug. “Obesity threatens the overall wellbeing of patients and is a major public health concern,” Dr. Janet Woodcock, director of the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in a statement. It’s the second obesity drug to win FDA approval this summer. Qsymia combines phentermine, a stimulant, with the anti-seizure drug topiramate. And the FDA worries about irresponsible doctors who dispense pills from their offices to just about all comers, whether they’re in the group that’s supposed to get the drug or not. Vivus, the company that makes the drug, has said it’s aware of this and has said it would restrict who can prescribe Qsymia and how. Michael Lauer, a cardiologist at the National Institutes of Health who was on the panel of experts that advised the FDA about the drug. Lauer and one other panelist voted against approval, but 20 panelists endorsed the drug in February. "As was the case for the diet drug lorcaserin (Belviq), approved last month despite concerns about heart valve damage, it was also reckless of the Food and Drug Administration to approve Qnexa. Reviewers say the amount of the drug phentermine in Qsymia is safer. Lauer said he would have liked to see more tests to specifically look for heart problems before the FDA approves the drug. Doctors tested the pill in more than 4,430 overweight and obese patients. more...



FDA approves weight - loss drug, with a new name

Janet Woodcock, director of the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in a statement. It’s the second obesity drug to win FDA approval this summer. Qsymia combines phentermine, a stimulant, with the anti-seizure drug topiramate. Vivus, the company that makes the drug, has said it’s aware of this and has said it would restrict who can prescribe Qsymia and how. Michael Lauer, a cardiologist at the National Institutes of Health who was on the panel of experts that advised the FDA about the drug.  Lauer and one other panelist voted against approval, but 20 panelists endorsed the drug in February. "As was the case for the diet drug lorcaserin (Belviq), approved last month despite concerns about heart valve damage, it was also reckless of the Food and Drug Administration to approve Qnexa. Reviewers say the amount of the drug phentermine in Qsymia is safer. Lauer said he would have liked to see more tests to specifically look for heart problems before the FDA approves the drug. Doctors tested the pill in more than 4,430 overweight and obese patients. more...



BELVIQ CIV is FDA Approved

Pregnancy: Do not take BELVIQ if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, as weight loss offers no potential benefit during pregnancy and BELVIQ may harm your unborn baby. Before taking BELVIQ, tell your doctor if you have or have had heart problems. Painful erections: If you have an erection lasting more than 4 hours while on BELVIQ, stop taking BELVIQ and call your doctor or go to the nearest emergency room right away. For more information about BELVIQ®, talk to your doctor and see the full Product Information . Not valid for prescriptions for BELVIQ reimbursed in full by any third-party payer. Patients and pharmacies are responsible for disclosing to insurance carriers the redemption and value of the card and complying with any other conditions imposed by insurance carriers or third-party payers. The value of this card is not contingent on any prior or future purchases. The card is solely intended to provide savings on any purchase of BELVIQ. Use of the card for any 1 purchase does not obligate the patient to make future purchases of BELVIQ or any other product. Please be advised that the personal information you provide will be used to satisfy your request to receive or activate a trial voucher or savings card. The marketer of BELVIQ, Eisai Inc. Please do not submit any personal information unless you have read and agree with the terms of that Privacy Policy. Does not endorse and is not responsible for the content included on the site you are about to enter. more...



BELVIQ - New FDA Approved Weight Loss Drug - Finally Lose

Who can take Belviq? How can I get Belviq? What is Belviq? Can anyone take Belviq? What are the Belviq guidlines? Can I take Belviq if I am nursing? What is the dosage for Belviq? What are the side effects with Belviq? Can I take Belviq with a heart condition? What is the retail price of Belviq? Can I take Belviq with other weight loss medications? Can a child take Belviq? What is the difference between Qsymia and Belviq? Are Qsymia and Belviq the same? more...



FDA approves new weight loss drug Contrave - CBS News

Regulators are greenlighting a new weight-loss drug called Contrave, the third in a string of approvals for anti-obesity treatments. The drug was developed by Orexigen Therapeutics Inc., based in La Jolla, California. The Food and Drug Administration said Thursday that it is approved for use by people who have a body mass index of 30 or higher, which is the level at which people are considered to be obese . D., director of the Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology Products in FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, in a press statement. The agency approved the drug for use in combination with a reduced-calorie diet and exercise. In testing, patients without diabetes who used the drug lost 4.1 percent more weight than those who took a placebo. The FDA recommends physicians who prescribe the drug evaluate their patients after 12 weeks to determine if it is working. The FDA refused to approve the drug in 2011, citing cardiovascular risks. In addition to Contrave, the FDA has approved Qsymia from Vivus Inc. Orexigen and Takeda plan to start selling the drug this fall. more...



New Weight Loss Drug Saxenda Approved By FDA

New Weight Loss Drug Saxenda Approved By FDA. A new weight loss drug was approved by the FDA to be issued to obese people in conjunction with a low-calorie diet and exercise. 23 by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Before approving the drug Tuesday, the FDA evaluated Saxenda in three clinical trials that involved about 4,800 obese and overweight patients with and without significant weight-related conditions. The drug was only approved for obese adults with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or greater, according the news release. more...



FDA approves a device for weight loss - LA Times

FDA approves a device for weight loss. Marketing of an implantable device that manipulates appetite signals passing between the brain and gut. An implantable device for weight loss wins the FDA's blessing. Marketing of an implantable device that stimulates weight loss by manipulating key appetite signals passing between the brain and the gut. While the FDA has approved four medications for weight loss in the past 2 1/2 years, the Maestro system is the first weight loss device to be approved since 2007. The FDA approved the use of the device in adult patients with a body mass index, or BMI, between 35 and 45, who have at least one other obesity-related condition, such as type 2 diabetes . Delivered by the Maestro device, vagal blocking therapy, or VBLOC, offers obese patients a weight loss therapy that does not permanently alter the digestive system in the way that gastric bypass surgery does, and which may be less expensive, said Lea. In a 12-month clinical trial considered by the FDA, 38.3% of subjects who received the active Maestro device lost at least a quarter of their excess weight, and 52.5% of subjects lost at least 20% of their excess weight. Researchers testing the device also observed that, like bariatric surgery, it might have beneficial effects that go beyond weight loss. Suppressing signals between gut and brain on the vagus nerve appeared to improve the metabolic function of obese patients who got the device. "You actually see the effect before patients actually have had that much weight loss," said Dr. Ken Fujioka, a Scripps Institute endocrinologist and weight management expert who conducted some of the studies that led to the Entero Medics device. That suggests that the device may be especially beneficial for those who have developed obesity-related type 2 diabetes, he said. As a result, said Lea, the Maestro device appears to be safe and effective for long-term use, and unlike surgical alterations to the digestive system, reversible. more...



FDA Approves New Weight - Loss Drug

The agency on Tuesday approved Saxenda (liraglutide) for adults who are obese or for those who are overweight and have at least one weight-related health condition, such as high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes or high cholesterol. Patients taking the drug, made by Novo Nordisk, should still follow a low-calorie diet and exercise regularly, the FDA noted. Three clinical trials assessed the safety and effectiveness of the drug for weight loss. Of the people treated with the drug, 62 percent lost at least 5 percent of their body weight. The FDA added that patients should be examined to determine if Saxenda is working after 16 weeks of treatment. Those who do not lose at least 4 percent of their body weight by that time should stop taking the medication, the FDA said. Patients who experience a prolonged increase in their resting heart rate should stop taking Saxenda, the FDA added. Tumors of the thyroid gland were associated with Saxenda treatment in rodent studies. Patients who have been diagnosed with MTC or have a family history of the condition should not take Saxenda. Patients with a condition known as multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 2, which increases the risk for MTC, should also not take Saxenda, the agency said. The FDA has also required that additional studies involving Saxenda investigate the safety and effectiveness of the drug in children, including how it could affect growth and development. Ongoing clinical trials are also examining the possible risk of breast cancer associated with Saxenda. more...



A New Medication for Weight Loss - The Dr. Oz Show

The New Silver Bullet for Weight Loss. Qnexa is a new, potent, effective and safe weight-loss drug that will help in the fight against obesity; it is poised to become the first FDA-approved weight-loss pill in 13 years. Qnexa is a combination pill of two medicines already on the market: phentermine and extended-release topiramate. It is now estimated that 2 of every 3 people are overweight, and about 30% of the population is obese. The studies that looked at Qnexa showed 9.8-14.7% weight loss, depending on the dose and the amount that you are overweight. At the time, we were using both phentermine and topiramate for weight-loss – but individually. Their side effects are quite different so that some patients did better on one drug and some did better on the other. For some, the phentermine’s effect is incomplete and adding topiramate has really helped. For most, adding the second drug boosts the appetite-suppressant effect and there is less hunger. more...



Weight loss drug Saxenda wins FDA approval - CBS News

A new, injectable weight-loss drug has been approved by the U. The agency on Tuesday approved Saxenda (liraglutide) for adults who are obese or for those who are overweight and have at least one weight-related health condition , such as high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes or high cholesterol. Patients taking the drug, made by Novo Nordisk, should still follow a low-calorie diet and exercise regularly, the FDA noted. Three clinical trials assessed the safety and effectiveness of the drug for weight loss. The trials involved roughly 4,800 obese and overweight people with and without other weight-related conditions. One clinical trial that involved patients without diabetes found that patients taking Saxenda had an average weight loss of 4.5 percent after one year. Of the people treated with the drug, 62 percent lost at least 5 percent of their body weight. The FDA added that patients should be examined to determine if Saxenda is working after 16 weeks of treatment. Those who do not lose at least 4 percent of their body weight by that time should stop taking the medication, the FDA said. more...



New FDA - Approved Weight - Loss Device Targets Nerves In

The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has just approved a new weight-loss device that works with the nerves in the brain, “tricking” it to believe that an individual is full. Are considered to be overweight, and 31 percent fall under the obese category. These are startling statistics when the actual numbers are calculated to be over 79 million people, and by all estimations, that number is only going to increase. If a person falls within the 25.0 to 29.9 range, they are considered to be overweight, and those falling within the 30 or higher range are considered to be obese. The device, called the Maestro Rechargeable System, is the first FDA-approved weight-loss device since 2007, and is developed by the Entero-Medics Corporation. The gadget itself isn’t large, and is similar in appearance to that of an insulin pump used by many diabetes sufferers. The pulses continue after a meal and convince the brain that the stomach is fuller longer than it actually is. Over half of the experimental group lost 20 percent of their body weight, and 38 percent lost 25 percent of their body weight. It is only being used for patients aged 18 and older who have not successfully lost weight with a traditional weight-loss program, and who have a BMI between 35 to 45. H., deputy director for science and chief scientist in the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, weighed in on the issue. With weight and obesity being a near obsession in the United States and elsewhere, a new medical device approved for weight-loss is a beacon of hope for some. more...



FDA approves new weight loss drug

Regulators have greenlighted a new weight-loss drug called Contrave, the third in a string of approvals for prescription medications aimed at the nation's 78 million obese adults. The pill, Contrave, is a combination of two drugs that are already approved, naltrexone and bupropion. Contrave joins two similar drugs from Arena Pharmaceuticals and Vivus Inc. The Food and Drug Administration said Thursday that it is approved for use by people who have a body mass index of 30 or higher, which is the level at which people are considered to be obese. The agency approved the drug for use in combination with a reduced-calorie diet and exercise. Contrave will have a boxed warning about the risk of suicidal thoughts associated with antidepressants like Bupropion. Experts caution that potentially dangerous drug interactions are a risk with the new generation of weight-loss drugs. Contrave will have an uphill battle in the U. Contrave will be distributed in the U. Orexigen and Takeda plan to start selling the drug this fall. more...



What Is Belviq, the New Weight Loss Drug? - Huffington Post

What Is Belviq, the New Weight Loss Drug? Belviq is a new weight loss drug that just became available by prescription this past week, one of only two new weight loss drugs approved by the FDA in the last 13 years. Pharmaceutical companies create new drugs, experiment with them, then market them for the effects that they produce. Reliable clinical studies have shown that people given the drug lost weight slightly more than people given a placebo , even without instruction in weight loss protocols. In almost all cases, the weight loss was slight, and the weight was regained after the trials. One would assume, based on the results of the clinical studies, that eating drive was reduced by the drug. We must establish new behavior where we eat less, to the degree that we lose weight and keep it off. Many people have used The Anderson Method to do just that, some saying it was easy. If you can do that without drugs, that will be the best solution. After all, you don't want to be taking these drugs for the rest of your life, even if they are safe. My advice, if you want to try a drug to help with weight control, is to find an expert in these drugs (psychiatrists or psychiatric nurses) and try one that is known to be safe. more...




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