Muscle atrophy and weight loss


Muscle Atrophy - Symptoms, Causes, Treatments

Muscle Atrophy. What is muscle atrophy? Muscle atrophy, or muscle wasting, results from loss of muscle tissue. The aging process often leads to slow but progressive muscle atrophy. Muscle atrophy caused by a nerve problem is called neurogenic atrophy. Seek prompt medical care if you are being treated for muscle atrophy but mild symptoms recur or are persistent. more...



Muscle Atrophy - National Library of Medicine - PubMed Health

Drug treatment for spinal muscular atrophy types II and III. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disorder that results in progressive muscle weakness with onset in childhood and adolescence. Drug treatment for SMA type I is discussed in a separate Cochrane review. This review is of drug treatment for SMA types II and III. The age of onset of SMA type II is between six and 18 months. Children with SMA type III develop the ability to walk at some time and their life expectancy is normal. Thus, there is still no known efficacious drug treatment for SMA types II and III. Drug treatment for spinal muscular atrophy type I. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a severe neuromuscular disease with onset in childhood and adolescence that results in progressive muscle weakness. Drug treatment for SMA types II and III is discussed in a separate Cochrane review. The age of onset of SMA type I, also known as Werdnig‐Hoffmann disease, is before six months. Children with SMA type I will never be able to sit without support and usually die by the age of two years. There was only one small randomised trial in the original review, which assessed the efficacy of riluzole for 10 children with SMA type I. No drug treatment has been shown to have significant efficacy for SMA type I. more...



Fast Weight Loss May Mean Muscle Loss

The researchers put 25 participants on a five-week very-low-calorie diet of just 500 calories per day. The average weight loss was a little over 19 pounds among those on the very-low-calorie diet and just under 19 pounds among those on the low-calorie diet. Participants on the very-low-calorie diet had lost about 3.5 pounds of fat-free mass, compared with 1.3 pounds among those on the low-calorie diet. Fat-free mass accounted for 18 percent of weight loss in the very-low-calorie diet group and 7.7 percent of weight loss in the low-calorie diet group, the study found. Four weeks after the end of their diets, reductions in fat-free mass averaged 1.8 pounds among those in the very-low-calorie diet group and 0.7 pounds among those in the low-calorie diet group. Fat-free mass accounted for 9.4 percent of weight loss in the very-low-calorie diet group and 2.9 percent of weight loss in the low-calorie diet group, according to the report. "Loss of fat-free mass was higher after rapid than slow diet-induced weight loss with similar total weight loss," said the study's authors, Roel Vink and Marleen van Baak, of the School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism at Maastricht University in the Netherlands, and colleagues. However, the authors also pointed out in a meeting news release that muscle loss among people in the very-low-calorie diet was likely overestimated immediately after they completed the diet, compared with four weeks later. This is likely because they had a larger loss of water and glycogen (a natural form of sugar in the body) when they had just completed the diet than four weeks later, the researchers explained. more...



Muscle atrophy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Other syndromes or conditions which can induce skeletal muscle atrophy are liver disease, and starvation. Muscle atrophy occurs by a change in the normal balance between protein synthesis and protein degradation. [1] The particular protein degradation pathway which seems to be responsible for much of the muscle loss seen in a muscle undergoing atrophy is the ATP -dependent ubiquitin / proteasome pathway. A CT scan can distinguish muscle tissue from other tissues and thereby estimate the amount of muscle tissue in the body. During aging, there is a gradual decrease in the ability to maintain skeletal muscle function and mass. Muscle atrophy can be opposed by the signaling pathways which induce muscle hypertrophy , or an increase in muscle size. Inactivity and starvation in mammals lead to atrophy of skeletal muscle, accompanied by a smaller number and size of the muscle cells as well as lower protein content. [4] In humans, prolonged periods of immobilization, as in the cases of bed rest or astronauts flying in space, are known to result in muscle weakening and atrophy. During hibernation, bears spend four to seven months of inactivity and anorexia without undergoing muscle atrophy and protein loss. [5] There are a few known factors that contribute to the sustaining of muscle tissue. During the summer period, bears take advantage of the nutrition availability and accumulate muscle protein. [4] Another factor that contributes to the sustaining of muscle strength in hibernating bears is the occurrence of periodic voluntary contractions and involuntary contractions from shivering during torpor . [7] The three to four daily episodes of muscle activity are responsible for the maintenance of muscle strength and responsiveness in bears during hibernation. more...



BodyLogicMD - Male Muscle Loss

Male muscle loss is a common symptom of andropause and it manifests itself in the loss of muscle strength and overall muscle mass. When your body is experiencing a loss of testosterone it can cause male muscle loss because there is not enough of the hormone to bind to your muscle cells. After the age of 60, male muscle loss doubles to about 1 percent every year. Muscles need protein to grow and if your diet is high in sugar and low in protein, your muscles will not have the fuel they need to regenerate resulting in male muscle loss. The practitioners of the Body Logic MD network offer treatment plans that can promote improvements in muscle mass and strength. Contact the Body Logic MD affiliated bioidentical hormone doctor nearest you to schedule an appointment and learn more about male muscle loss treatment that includes bioidentical hormone replacement therapy. Body Logic MD can be used to relieve the effects of testosterone and muscle loss in men. more...



What Causes Leg Muscle Atrophy

What Causes Leg Muscle Atrophy? Muscle atrophy is a loss of muscle tissue due to disuse, disease or injury. Atrophy can occur more suddenly with illness or injury to the muscles or their nerves, and the muscles in the legs are among the first to weaken. Even after muscle loss, the atrophy in your legs can be reversed through physical activity. What Causes Atrophy of the Leg Muscles? A less common cause of atrophy of the leg muscles is injury or illness affecting the nerves that connect to the muscles. more...



Can muscle relaxers cause muscle loss? - WebMD Answers

How are muscle spasms treated? What are muscle cramps? What is the treatment of skeletal muscle cramps? Most cramps can be stopped if the muscle can be stretched. What are the symptoms and signs of muscle spasms? How are muscle spasms diagnosed? How can muscle cramps be prevented? Can medications cause muscle cramps? Can poor circulation cause muscle cramps? What is a muscle spasm? more...



Muscle Atrophy : Causes, Symptoms and Diagnosis

Muscle atrophy is when muscles waste away. You may have muscle loss if one of your. Muscle Atrophy. You may have muscle loss if one of your limbs appears smaller (not shorter) than the other. Causes of Muscle Atrophy. Muscle atrophy can also happen if you are bedridden or unable to move certain body parts due to a medical condition. Other causes for muscle atrophy include: Diseases can cause muscles to waste away or can make movement difficult, leading to muscle atrophy. Dermatomyositis (a muscle disease) Guillain-Barre syndrome (an autoimmune disease that leads to nerve inflammation and muscle weakness) Muscular dystrophy (an inherited disease that causes muscle weakness) Signs of Muscle Atrophy. You may have muscle atrophy if: Contact your doctor to have a complete medical examination if you believe you may have muscle atrophy or if you are unable to move in a normal manner. How Muscle Atrophy Is Diagnosed. more...



How To Stay Strong and Prevent Muscle Loss

How To Stay Strong And Prevent Muscle Loss. Here, we explain just how long it takes to lose muscle mass and strength, and what to do stop it from happening. One study on rats found that just 48 hours after exercise, the body hits a lower steady-state rate of protein synthesis and stops building and repairing muscle . Age: Regardless of how often we make it to the gym, the natural process of aging can cause muscle loss. The rate of sarcopenia picks up as we age; by the time we get to age 50, a person can lose 0.4 pounds of muscle every year . Sleep: Because sleep debt decreases the rate at which the body builds and repairs muscle, skipping sleep to hit the weight room can neutralize results . How much and how fast muscles atrophy, or lose mass, depends on the muscle. General muscle strength is usually maintained for at least the first month of inactivity. There's no easy way to prevent loss of muscle mass and strength. While results are inconclusive as to whether eating more protein, specifically, can prevent muscle loss, a balanced diet helps ensure that muscles get the amino acids, vitamins, and minerals they need to build and stay strong . It's no cryogenic deep freeze, but generally, the sooner we start an exercise regimen, the sooner our muscles will make like Austin Powers and "freeze." more...



Muscle wasting, weight loss, yervoy and steroids

Muscle wasting, weight loss, yervoy & steroids. My husband, Ron, has been struggling with weight loss, but more frighteningly, muscle loss. I've researched (Googled, more accurately) and found that the particular steroid he was prescribed, Dexamethasone (a flourinated steroid) is well-known for causing muscle wasting. That, while all steroids can cause muscle loss, this drug is the worst of the lot. Yervoy can cause weight loss. Cancer can cause muscle wasting and weight loss. We really didn't need anything else to contribute to the muscle wasting aspect! Block, he should be consuming around 2600 calories to help counteract the weight loss. Although he still has a weak voice,  and a bad limp because of Drop Foot/neuropathy, we are hopeful that he can at some point resume the Yervoy therapy. more...



Muscle atrophy - University of Maryland Medical Center

Last reviewed on 2/10/2014. Review provided by Veri Med Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, Ph D, and the A. Editorial team. Is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation Health Care Commission (www.urac.org). Follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. Is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. M.'s editorial policy, editorial process and privacy policy. Is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation ( www.hon.ch ) The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only - they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited. more...



Sarcopenia

From the time you are born to around the time you turn 30, your muscles grow larger and stronger. But at some point in your 30s, you begin to lose muscle mass and function, a condition known as age-related sarcopenia or sarcopenia with aging. Although there is no generally accepted test or specific level of muscle mass for sarcopenia diagnosis, any loss of muscle mass is of consequence, because loss of muscle means loss of strength and mobility. Sarcopenia typically accelerates around age 75 - although it may happen in people age 65 or 80 - and is a factor in the occurrence of frailty and the likelihood of falls and fractures in older adults. The primary treatment for sarcopenia is exercise. Specifically, resistance training or strength training - exercise that increases muscle strength and endurance with weights or resistance bands - has been shown to be useful for both the prevention and treatment of sarcopenia. more...



Catabolic Wasting - Cachexia and Sarcopenia

Loss of muscle and fat tissue due to chronic illness is called cachexia. The general loss of weight and muscle mass that occurs with advancing age is called sarcopenia. In both cachexia and sarcopenia, muscle loss can lead to frailty and adversely affect a variety of clinical outcomes (Rolland 2011; Fearon 2013; Muscaritoli 2013). The term “catabolic wasting” encompasses both sarcopenia and cachexia. Cachexia usually causes more rapid and pronounced weight reduction than sarcopenia and is generally characterized as loss of muscle and fat tissue totaling more than 5% of body weight, but losses of more than 20% of body weight are common (Rolland 2011; Nicolini 2013; Siddiqui 2006; Muscaritoli 2013; Gordon 2004; Gullett 2011). Sarcopenia (from the Greek meaning "poverty of flesh") generally refers to age-related loss of muscle mass and function (Iannuzzi-Sucich 2002). Some researchers refer to age-related muscle loss not associated with an underlying cause as “primary sarcopenia,” and that which occurs as a consequence of one or more other causes as “secondary sarcopenia” (Rolland 2011; Muscaritoli 2013). However, many standard medical therapies to treat sarcopenia and cachexia present the risk of adverse effects such as nausea, edema, and fatigue, and some of them have not been adequately tested in clinical trials (Gullett 2010; Fox 2009; Fearon 2013). Early recognition and treatment of cachexia is even more important, considering that losing as little as 5% of body weight in cancer patients may increase the risk of adverse effects from chemotherapy drugs (Brotto 2012; Fearon 2013). more...



How to Stay Strong and Prevent Muscle Loss

How to Stay Strong and Prevent Muscle Loss. Here, we explain just how long it takes to lose muscle mass and strength, and what to do stop it from happening. One study on rats found that just 48 hours after exercise, the body hits a lower steady-state rate of protein synthesis and stops building and repairing muscle. Protein metabolism and beta-myosin heavy-chain m RNA in unweighted soleus muscle . Age: Regardless of how often we make it to the gym, the natural process of aging can cause muscle loss. Sarcopenia- Age-Related Muscle Wasting and Weakness: Mechanisms and Treatments . Resistance exercise for the aging adult: clinical implications and prescription guidelines . Sleep: Because sleep debt decreases the rate at which the body builds and repairs muscle, skipping sleep to hit the weight room can neutralize results. Sleep and muscle recovery: endocrinological and molecular basis for a new and promising hypothesis . How much and how fast muscles atrophy, or lose mass, depends on the muscle. Skeletal muscle form and function . General muscle strength is usually maintained for at least the first month of inactivity. There's no easy way to prevent loss of muscle mass and strength. While results are inconclusive as to whether eating more protein, specifically, can prevent muscle loss, a balanced diet helps ensure that muscles get the amino acids, vitamins, and minerals they need to build and stay strong. Does protein supplementation prevent muscle disuse atrophy and loss of strength ? more...



Weight loss - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Weight loss. [1] [2] [3] [7] [8] [9] Poor nutrient utilization can lead to weight loss, and can be caused by fistulae in the gastrointestinal tract, diarrhea, drug-nutrient interaction, enzyme depletion and muscle atrophy. Unintentional weight loss can be the characteristic leading to diagnosis of diseases such as cancer [1] and type 1 diabetes . [7] Around 25% experience moderate to severe weight loss, and most others have some weight loss. [7] Greater weight loss is associated with poorer prognosis. People with HIV often experience weight loss, and it is associated with poorer outcomes. Medical treatment can directly or indirectly cause weight loss, impairing treatment effectiveness and recovery that can lead to further weight loss in a vicious cycle. Intentional weight loss is the loss of total body mass as a result of efforts to improve fitness and health, or to change appearance through slimming. Weight loss in individuals who are overweight or obese can reduce health risks, [19] increase fitness, [20] and may delay the onset of diabetes . Weight loss occurs when the body is expending more energy in work and metabolism than it is absorbing from food or other nutrients. The healthiest weight loss regimen, therefore, is one that consists of a balanced diet and moderate physical activity.[ citation needed ] The least intrusive weight loss methods, and those most often recommended, are adjustments to eating patterns and increased physical activity, generally in the form of exercise. In order for weight loss to be permanent, changes in diet and lifestyle must be permanent as well. more...



Muscular Atrophy in Older Dogs

Muscular Atrophy in Older Dogs. It can be observed as a loss of muscle tone and is most obvious on the hind legs and hips of senior dogs. Muscular atrophy has two main causes: lack of activity and disease, the two frequently working hand in hand. If your dog shows signs of significant muscular atrophy, or the loss is visible around his head and neck, it may be a sign of serious illness. Arthritis attacks the joints of older dogs, not the muscles, but can still lead to muscle atrophy. This decrease in activity, coupled with reluctance to stretch the muscles and use them fully, leads to muscular atrophy. Pain management medications as well as joint support and physical therapy can minimize the effects of arthritis, which in turn encourages your dog to exercise and restore his muscle mass. In the absence of other problems, muscular atrophy is treated with regular exercise and weight loss. Extra weight puts pressure on your dog's joints and makes movement more difficult, so losing weight encourages him to move and exercise more, in turn reducing muscular atrophy. more...



Muscle Atrophy - Symptoms, Causes, Tests - NY Times Health

There are two types of muscle atrophy. In most people, muscle atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough. People with seated jobs, medical conditions that limit their movement, or decreased activity levels can lose muscle tone and develop atrophy. The most severe type of muscle atrophy is neurogenic atrophy. It occurs when there is an injury to, or disease of, a nerve that connects to the muscle. This type of muscle atrophy tends to occur more suddenly than disuse atrophy. An exercise program (under the direction of a therapist or doctor) is recommended to help treat muscle atrophy. This may include exercises in water to reduce the muscle workload, and other types of rehabilitation. When did the muscle atrophy begin? The doctor will look at your arms and legs and measure muscle size to try to determine which nerve or nerves are affected. Is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. more...



The Mechanism of Muscle Loss in Cancer

The Mechanism of Muscle Loss in Cancer. Cancer wasting, also called cancer cachexia, is marked by weakness and the progressive loss of body weight, fat, and muscle. The cells then fuse with surrounding muscle fibers to increase muscle mass. In both mice and cancer patients, wasting was associated with muscle damage and activation of nearby stem cells. However, the stem cells became arrested in a semi-differentiated state and failed to fuse with the other muscle fibers. When arrested stem cells from wasting mice were removed from the tumor environment and placed in tumor-free culture, they were able to complete differentiation to muscle cells. When tumors were excised from wasting mice, the stem cells in the mice were able to complete their differentiation and fuse into muscle fibers. Consequently, the mice regained muscle mass. They found that overexpression of Pax7, which regulates muscle stem cell proliferation, impairs the stem cells’ differentiation to muscle cells in mice with cachexia. “By identifying agents that overcome the block and allow muscle stem cells to differentiate, it might be possible to restore muscle mass and enhance the quality of life of cancer patients with cachexia.” more...



Muscle Loss in Dogs, Muscle Wastage in Senior Dogs Dog

Aspergillosis is a fungal disease that usually affects the nasal passages and respiratory system. If the disease spreads throughout the body it is known as disseminated aspergillosis. The most common form of thyroid disease is autoimmune thyroiditis, which is typified by the antithyroid antibodies that appear in the canine’s blood and tissue. The most common treatment for thyroid disease is daily injections of the T 4 hormone; the brand names for T 4 hormones are Soloxine and Synthroid. Myositis is an inflammation of the muscles and can be a sign of a more serious illness. Myositis can affect just one muscle, such as the jaw, or it can affect groups at a time. Although degenerative myelopathy is a spinal cord disorder, it also causes muscle wasting and loss in the hind legs. While the cause of degenerative myelopathy is unknown, it is thought to be an autoimmune disease. The term tick disease is used as an umbrella term that includes Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever and basesiosis. Symptom of tick-related disease include muscle wasting, swelling of the extremities, nose bleeds and fever. Some muscle loss, notably on the head and the belly muscles, can signify diseases such as masticatory myositis and Cushing’s Disease. Treatment may include drug therapy, surgery, physical therapy and muscle support products – the best being our Spero harness. more...



Muscle atrophy and Weight loss - Right Diagnosis

AND Weakness (185 matches) AND Sensations (110 matches) AND Impotence (17 matches) AND Vertigo (17 matches) AND Osteoporosis (17 matches) AND Drowsiness (16 matches) AND Anorexia (15 matches) AND Amenorrhea (14 matches) AND Blindness (14 matches) AND Malabsorption (7 matches) AND Infertility (6 matches) more...



Muscle wasting and weakness and Weight loss

AND Weakness (16 matches) AND Fever (7 matches) AND Sweating (6 matches) AND Sleeplessness (5 matches) AND Dehydration (4 matches) AND Tremor (4 matches) AND Hoarse (4 matches) AND Malnutrition (4 matches) AND Lymphadenopathy (4 matches) AND Neuropathy (3 matches) AND Oligomenorrhoea (3 matches) AND Redness (3 matches) AND Thirst (3 matches) more...



Common Reasons for Weight Loss and Muscle Wasting

Common Reasons for Weight Loss & Muscle Wasting. Weight loss and muscle loss can result from diet, medical conditions or aging. Weight and muscle loss can result from various conditions. Because they can result from serious health conditions, anyone experiencing sudden changes in weight or muscle mass should see their physician. Common causes for weight loss and muscle wasting, or sarcopenia, include changes in diet and activity level, disease and age. This is why proper nutrition and exercise plans should be implemented to prevent muscle loss as you lose weight, the 2008 text "Physiology of Sport and Exercise" notes. more...



Muscle Atrophy Symptoms, Causes and Treatments

Muscle Atrophy Symptoms, Causes and Treatments. While the medical term is muscle atrophy, most of us refer to it as muscle wasting or wasting of the muscles. The first type is called ‘disuse atrophy’ while the other is referred to as ‘neurogenic atrophy,’ and while many of the symptoms may be the same, the causes are dissimilar and the treatments will vary as well. Most of the time muscle atrophy is simply the result of disuse. This will cause compression of spinal cord which then affects the nerve and can result in neurogenic muscle atrophy. Signs and Symptoms of Muscle Atrophy. The signs and symptoms of neurogenic muscle atrophy are a bit more difficult for the layperson to recognize quickly. Consequently, one of the first signs of neurogenic muscle atrophy is a stooped posture. Again, the heart is a muscle and should it atrophy, it will most likely also fail. Disuse muscle atrophy can often be corrected with the proper amount and type of exercise while neurogenic atrophy may be treated in one or more ways. more...



Muscle Wasting and Weight Gain

Muscle Wasting and Weight Gain. 125,023 conversations around the web about Muscle Wasting to help you make a decision. Treato found 8,662 discussions about Weight Gain and Muscle Wasting on the web. 6.93% of the posts that mention Muscle Wasting also mention Weight Gain (8,662 posts) Muscle Wasting. Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnoses or treatment. Treato is not responsible for promotions validity, application of the promotion code varies among the different Telehealth sites (for example during registration flow). more...



Cancer, Weight Changes, Muscle Loss, Fatigue

Treating and managing these symptoms can help you feel better and allow you to continue with more of your usual activities. These substances can lead to weight loss, muscle loss, and a decrease in appetite. They can also lead to side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and mouth sores, which can affect your ability to eat normally, further contributing to weight and muscle loss. Fatigue is also a factor, since the decreases in exercise and other physical activities that happen when you’re not feeling well can also contribute to muscle loss. How are weight changes and muscle loss treated? These drugs can increase appetite for some people and may help to prevent weight and muscle loss, but they do not build up lost muscle tissue. What can I do to help maintain my weight and build strength? You can also try some upper body exercises while sitting in a chair – moving your arms up and down and front to back can help maintain flexibility. Making a fist and lifting your arms up and down in front of you can increase strength. Note the type of exercises or other physical activities you do and how they affect your mood and energy level. Nutritionists and physical or occupational therapists can advise you on other ways to maintain your weight and build strength as you cope with cancer. more...



Methamphetamine Weight Loss and Meth Effects on the Body

The Meth Diet. When the body isn’t getting enough nutrients, it goes into a dangerous state of starvation. Because the body isn’t getting protein and has used up stored fat, it will eat into muscle. Meth turns off the body’s hunger response, which can result in a decline in body mass. Also known as “wasting syndrome,” cachexia is when the body wastes away from loss of weight, fat, and muscle mass caused by diseases like cancer or from chronic methamphetamine use. Severe wasting away of the body to just skin and bones. The deterioration of muscle tissue. Methamphetamine users often lose a lot of weight, and much of it can come from the damaging reduction of muscle mass and function. The breaking down of muscle tissue. Meth can damage and weaken muscle tissue, leading to this condition. more...



Causes of Muscular Atrophy, Muscle Loss, Muscle Atrophy

Causes of Muscular Atrophy, Muscle Loss, Muscle Atrophy, Muscle Wasting. Muscle atrophy and muscle tissue loss or wasting are synonymous. Muscle atrophy caused by non-use bestows the greatest loss of muscle size and strength. A sedentary lifestyle is a primary factor leading to muscle tone lose and atrophy development. more...



Muscle Atrophy, Causes, Tests, Diagnosis and Treatment

Muscle atrophy takes place when a muscle partially or completely wastes away and its mass decreases. Most cases of muscle atrophy are usually results of other pre-existing medical conditions that include the loss of muscle mass as a side effect. Some medical conditions that have muscle atrophy as one of its signs and symptoms may include: The reversibility of muscle atrophy will depend on the case of treatment as well as at the discretion of the physician; he or she may prescribe supplements that may help retain muscle mass. Anorexia nervosa : This eating disorder, characterized by the refusal of food due to an obsessive maintenance of body weight, can also lead to muscle atrophy. Similar to starvation, the symptoms of muscle atrophy can be reversed with therapy and adopting a healthy diet. Depending on the seriousness of COPD, there is a chance that muscle atrophy may be reversed by successful treating COPD. Drug abuse: Recreational drug abuse, such as the abuse of methamphetamine, can lead to muscle atrophy and possibly death. more...



Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Weight Loss

Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Weight Loss. 1,876 conversations around the web about Spinal Muscular Atrophy to help you make a decision. Treato found 9 discussions about Weight Loss and Spinal Muscular Atrophy on the web. Symptoms and conditions also mentioned with Spinal Muscular Atrophy in patients' discussions. 0.48% of the posts that mention Spinal Muscular Atrophy also mention Weight Loss (9 posts) Spinal Muscular Atrophy. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnoses or treatment. more...



Skeletal muscle loss : cachexia, sarcopenia, and inactivity

Loss of skeletal muscle protein results from an imbalance between the rate of muscle protein synthesis and degradation. Cachexia, sarcopenia, and atrophy due to inactivity are characterized by a loss of muscle mass. It is characterized by loss of skeletal muscle and body weight. Sarcopenia is the age-associated loss of skeletal muscle and function. Cachexia has been defined by Evans et al ( 1 ) as "a complex metabolic syndrome associated with underlying illness and characterized by loss of muscle with or without loss of fat mass. Although cachexia is associated with both fat and muscle loss, the benefits of preserving skeletal muscle or body fat stores is still unresolved. Loss of body weight, fat, and skeletal muscle has been associated with increased mortality in patients with cachexia. Skeletal muscle ( 22 ) and bone mass are the principal components of lean body mass to decline with age. Loss of skeletal muscle with advancing age begins relatively early, and continues until the end of life ( 22 ). These data along with no increase in 3-methylhistidine excretion led the authors to conclude that the increased nitrogen and muscle loss resulted from an inhibition of protein synthesis. The authors concluded ( 45 , 46 ) that the loss of body protein with inactivity was predominantly due to a decrease in muscle protein synthesis. These authors also showed that bedrest had no effect on the rate of muscle protein degradation, and muscle loading increased the rate of protein synthesis. more...



Severe Weight Loss after TBI and Muscle Atrophy

Severe Weight Loss after TBI and Muscle Atrophy. TBI Voices Severe Weight Loss after TBI and Muscle Atrophy. Severe Weight Loss after TBI : Zach Part Six. In part six I discussed the physical problems that occurred such as severe weight loss after TBI along with muscle atrophy. I did have a brain tube that was reducing the pressure, yeah. At the time you go to Spaulding Rehab, have they removed all that hardware from your head? Do you know when they took the trach out? So you had a feeding tube, when you still went to Spaulding which could attribute to severe weight loss after TBI? When did you become aware that that you had severe weight loss after TBI? Like I just lost all that weight? And that was like hard earned weight that I had gained over the years. Could you see the difference when you looked at yourself with your severe weight loss after TBI? more...



Is it fat loss or muscle wasting

Cachexia represents a challenging clinical syndrome with a profound effect on patients with cancer, including reduced physical function, reduced tolerance to anticancer therapy, and reduced survival.1 Yet, weight loss in patients with cancer often remains undiagnosed and untreated, primarily for two reasons: in the age of obesity, the importance of skeletal muscle mass—with or without loss of fat mass—is only now being evaluated, and a lack of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved treatments for cachexia.1. However, recent advances in understanding the biology of muscle wasting have led both to an international consensus on the definition and classification of cancer cachexia and an interest in developing pharmacologic treatments for muscle loss.2 To date, “most of the work on human body weight regulation has been done in the context of obesity,” explains Vickie E. Cachexia occurs in more than 80% of patients with gastric, pancreatic, and esophageal cancer; 70% of those with head and neck cancer; and approximately 60% of patients with lung, colorectal, and prostate cancer, and it contributes directly to death in 20% of cases.3,4 Cachexia was defined as a body mass index (BMI) of less than 20 kg/m2 and an unintentional weight loss of 5% or more over the past 6 months in the setting of underlying disease, such as cancer.3 The expert panel has now agreed that cachexia can develop progressively, from precachexia to cachexia to refractory cachexia, “a spectrum through which not all patients will progress.”1. The new diagnostic criterion for cachexia is weight loss of more than 5% over the past 6 months (in the absence of simple starvation); or BMI of less than 20 kg/m2 and any degree of weight loss greater than 2%; or appendicular skeletal muscle index consistent with sarcopenia (males. more...



Too much weight LOSS and muscle atrophy

I'm sorry your had to join this group, but you found a great place for support and information from other kindred spirits who have their own personal experience to share. Sorry you're having a hard time with the weight and muscle issues. And you'll get the support you need to help you through this journey. Here is a link for you about a high protein diet for chemo patients: "High protein diets for chemo patients - how to add protein to your diet. In addition, meat, nuts, and legumes are sources of high protein that chemo patients might want to consider for their diet enhancement. •Add cream sauces to vegetables and other dishes. The information contained in this website is meant to be helpful and educational, but is not a substitute for medical advice." Thank you to All who replied for the information and support. Beef and other meats are high in protein I just cannot eat it. But they tell me the combination of Beans and Brown Rice. more...




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