Diet Soda Pop And Weight Loss


Drink More Diet Soda, Gain More Weight

Overweight Risk Soars 41% With Each Daily Can of Diet Soft Drink. "There was a 41% increase in risk of being overweight for every can or bottle of diet soft drink a person consumes each day," Fowler says. 26% for up to 1/2 can each day. 30.4% for 1/2 to one can each day. 32.8% for 1 to 2 cans each day. 47.2% for more than 2 cans each day. 36.5% for up to 1/2 can each day. 37.5% for 1/2 to one can each day. 54.5% for 1 to 2 cans each day. 57.1% for more than 2 cans each day. For each can of diet soft drink consumed each day, a person's risk of obesity went up 41%. more...



Myth Buster - Can Diet Soda Help You Lose Weight

It's zero calories and has the same great taste, so it MUST be the better alternative if you want to lose weight, right? The Truth: Not only is diet soda NOT helping you lose weight, it has countless negative effects on your health. I had no idea how harmful the artificial sweeteners and chemicals in my soda could be to my body until I did the research. Here’s what you DON’T know about diet soda and why it’s actually not helping you lose weight. Diet soda is loaded with artificial sweeteners and chemicals that can be harmful to your body. When we eat regular sugar, our bodies register the sweetness and come to understand that very sweet things contain a lot of calories. If you still want to drink diet soda, consider that the “no calorie” claim doesn’t actually mean “zero.” Although diet sodas with aspartame may be labeled as “calorie-free,” aspartame breaks down in the body into methanol and amino acids, which generate calories. I get antioxidants and vitamin C from the cranberry and pomegranate juice for just 30 calories — and no chemicals. The Bottom Line: Diet soda will not aid your weight-loss efforts and has several negative effects on your body. Ditch the diet sodas and find healthy fixes that really do help, not hurt, your efforts to meet your goals. more...



Diet Soda Tends to Promote Weight Gain

In this study 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 diet soda consumption was linked to increased belly fat in Americans over the age of 65. Obesity is associated with one in five deaths in the US and, as noted by the authors, for older individuals who are already at an increased risk for metabolic disorders, increased visceral fat will exacerbate that risk. "Overall, the Cancer Research UK study found that obese women have about a one in four risk of developing a weight-related cancer in their lifetime. Artificial Sweeteners Is Not the Answer if You're Seeking to Lose Weight. Research over the last 30 years—including several large scale prospective cohort studies—have shown that artificial sweeteners actually stimulate appetite and increase cravings for carbs. They also produce a variety of metabolic dysfunctions that promote fat storage and weight gain , 15 , 16 and many studies have directly associated artificial sweeteners with an increased risk of obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Certain gut microbes have been linked to obesity, for example, and recent research 17 , 18 , 19 , 20 shows that artificial sweeteners raise your risk of obesity and diabetes by disrupting your intestinal microflora. Specifically, they found that artificial sweeteners cause decreased function in pathways associated with the transport of sugar in your body. Seven volunteers who did not use artificial sweeteners were then recruited, and asked to consume the equivalent of 10-12 single-dose packets of artificial sweeteners daily for one week. The evidence suggests that artificial sweeteners have likely played a role in actually worsening the obesity and diabetes epidemics since their emergence in our food supply. In addition to boosting weight gain and insulin resistance, artificial sweeteners can also be addictive. more...



Diet soda : A key to weight loss

Low energy sweeteners commonly used in diet sodas may help with weight loss, says a University of Bristol study, adding that confusion among consumers between sweeteners and sugar needs to be addressed. Writing in the International Journal of Obesity, the researchers, two of whom have affiliations with the low energy sweetener industry, say low energy sweetener (or LES) diet drinks are surrounded by conflicting perceptions on the effect on weight loss. The study looked at evidence surrounding the use of low energy sweeteners (LES) - such as stevia, sucralose and aspartame - and their effect on weight control. “We found a considerable weight of evidence in favor of consumption of LES in place of sugar as helpful in reducing relative EI [energy intake] and BW [body weight], with no evidence from the many acute and sustained intervention studies in humans that LES increase EI,” the study said. He said there were perceptions that LES could lead to a desire for sweet tasting products and relax a user’s restraint in eating. “The strongest sources of evidence, the human studies we looked at, they say consistently that consuming LES reduces energy intake and long term reduces body weight as well … Rogers said that LES aren’t increasing energy intake or bodyweight, so in many cases, they can be at least as good as water for weight loss. “If I’m consuming sugar-containing sodas and I want to cut the sugar out, then it’s easier for me to change to diet sodas than to water. I think that’s one way in which the diet sodas might have an advantage over water.” Another possible advantage LES drinks may have is to help reduce the desire for sweet drinks and desserts. However, he does believe water and drinks featuring LES are at least equivalent in the help they can lend to weight loss. How much benefit LES drinks have depends on the amount of sugar someone consumes in the first place, Rogers said. “Really it’s about how much energy you can take out of your diet,” he said. As listed in the “conflict of interest” section of this study, two researchers on this study were employees and shareholders of companies that manufacture products containing LES. more...



Soda makers want to cut calories : But is diet better

Soda: Coca-Cola – A 20-ounce bottle of Coca-Cola Classic contains 65 grams of sugar, which is the same amount of sugar found in five Little Debbie Swiss Rolls. Soda: Pepsi – A 20-ounce bottle of Pepsi contains 69 grams of sugar. Juice: Minute Maid 100% Apple Juice – This 15.2-ounce bottle contains 49 grams of sugar, which is about the amount of sugar in 10 Oreos. Juice: Sunny D Original – A 16-ounce bottle of Sunny D Original contains 28 grams of sugar. Each these six Oreos contains about 4.6 grams of sugar. Each of these 12 Hershey's Kisses contains approximately 2.5 grams of sugar. This 16-ounce can of Red Bull has 52 grams of sugar. Energy drink: Monster Energy – This 16-ounce can of Monster Energy has 54 grams of sugar. Milk: Silk Vanilla Soymilk – A glass of vanilla soymilk has about 8 grams of sugar, which is equal to the amount found in three Starbursts. Milk: Silk Almond Milk Original – A glass of original almond milk contains 7 grams of sugar. Juice smoothie: Naked Berry Blast – The 15.2-ounce bottle of Naked Berry Blast has 29 grams of sugar. Cookies contains about 3.6 grams of sugar. Each of these five Reese's cups contains about 11 grams of sugar. more...



Diet Soda and Belly Fat : Is Diet Soda Bad

These results, which the study authors call “striking,” add to the growing body of evidence that no- and low-calorie sweeteners may come with health concerns. Sugar-free sodas contain substances that sweeten up soda at 200-600 times the sweetness of sugar. That, Hazuda says, can lead to weight gain and cravings for sweeter and sweeter treats. A recent study in mice showed that artificial sweeteners actually changed the gut bacteria of mice in ways that made them vulnerable to insulin resistance and glucose intolerance — both of which can lead to weight gain. And other mice research suggests that artificial sweeteners are associated with a drop in the appetite-regulating hormone leptin, Hazuda says. Leptin is the hormone that inhibits hunger. The Calorie Control Council, an association that represents the reduced-calorie food and beverage industry — including alternative sweeteners — disagreed with the study’s findings. more...



Diet Soda : Health Risks, Weight Gain, Weight Loss, Pros

Learn the six ways your diet is messing with your metabolism . – Past research has shown that diet soda, and soda in general, may be responsible for leaching calcium out of your bones. This is not only bad news for obvious reasons of osteoporosis, but the bigger issue is that women are not getting enough calcium in their diets to begin with. Lots of people I talk to feel less "guilty" about having that burger and fries if it came with a side of diet soda. RELATED: Diet soda isn't the only questionable beverage. My take: If you drink diet soda, you might want to change things up a bit and try some water with a splash of fruit juice or a sprig of mint as an accompaniment to your meal. And if you believe the stories that connect diet soda with weight gain, don’t switch to regular, sugary soda. more...



Diet Soda Doesn’t Help You Lose Weight

Diet Soda Doesn’t Help You Lose Weight. Sales of diet soda beverages is the only number on the decline. According to new research from Wells Fargo, low-calorie and zero-calorie soda sales slipped about 7% over the past year. The reason remains a mystery, but perhaps folks are realizing that the benefits of drinking diet soda are just not there. In the alternative, the body may go in the other direction, burning though the circulating sugar so that the incoming soda doesn’t leave you with too much. But since the soda has no sugar at all, you wind up with a net loss—which may lead to a craving for candy or some other high-sugar snack. The solution: it’s better to kick the soda habit and stick to water. more...



Stop drinking diet soda. Lose weight. - Dr. Bob, The

First you have to be determined to lose weight. How do you know if your liver is congested? If you answered yes, your liver is congested. Do you have cold hands and feet? Are you constipated? If yes, you need to have your thyroid assessed. Are you stressed? If you are under stress, and you have high cortisol, your body is burning muscle. – Do you eat MSG? – Do you drink diet soda? more...



Can Diet Soda Cause Weight Gain

A: I believe they can, but the science is not decisive. The studies suggesting diet sodas, or anything containing sugar substitutes, can contribute to weight gain are based almost entirely on animal research. Sugar substitutes—saccharin, sucralose, aspartame, neotame, and acesulfame-K—unbundle the taste of sweetness from calories: The taste buds tell the brain that food is coming in, but the body doesn't get the energy it's expecting. This, apparently, undermines the ability of rats to judge how much they've consumed, and, over time, they begin to overeat and gain weight. If artificially sweetened sodas increase your cravings, the calories they take out of your diet are apt to sneak back in later when you, for instance, need a larger or sweeter dessert to feel satisfied. more...



Diet Soda for Weight Loss - Men's Fitness

The Four-Day Diet A new study says you can lose 11 pounds in 4 days. While the science behind whether diet soda can help you shed pounds has been debatable, new research from the University of Colorado and Temple University found that people drinking  diet soda  lost an average of 13 pounds in 12 weeks—4 more pounds than those who drank just water. Before you go to Costco and get a 12-pack of diet pop, take a look at exactly how the study participants lost the weight. After 12 weeks, the diet soda gulpers lost an average of 13 pounds compared to an average of 9 pounds for the H 20 drinkers. Lastly, reductions in LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol were significantly greater in the diet soda group than in the water group. While diet soda may contribute to weight loss efforts, it won’t hydrate you the same way that water does, and hydration is essential for maximum athletic performance. Basically, the participants in the water group probably didn’t lose as much weight because they ate more sweets as a result of giving up their daily fix of diet soda for 12 weeks. more...



Does diet soda have negative affects on weight loss

So I don't have the feeling that a moderate amount of diet soda has held me back at all. If you have control to just drink a soda it's not going to ruin your diet, it didn't mine. It's the colas that leach the calcium) and a diet gingerale. I went from drinking regular soda to diet and FINALLY I've kicked the habit all together. The ones that did were on a very strict diet and I just wonder if they we drinking water instead, how much more they would have lost. I began drinking 5 cans of diet coke per day (at least) to help me with my cravings for the junk food that I should not have been eating. Only on the second day did I really want one.but I hung in there and it has been almost a month since I have had a single diet coke (no soda at all) and I have not had a single craving for the diet soda or junk food. I have done the same thing.cut out all diet soda and the cravings are GONE GONE GONE! He also said he had two patients that lost 30 pounds just by stopping the diet soda. Well I have studied that the diet soda tricks your brain into eating or desiring to eat more. If you dont fall for the trcik and just drink one a day and not all the bad foods on top of it, is it really that bad for you? I am on a diet soda binge lately and I do find that it affects my weight loss in a negative way. If you are really serious about maintaining your weight or losing weight in the future, you should think about substitutes for diet soda. more...



Will Drinking Diet Soda Help You Lose Weight

This is certainly what the soda industry wants you to believe. Launched another ad campaign , this time assuring you that diet beverages containing the artificial sweetener aspartame are a safe alternative to regular soda. Now, the soda industry has taken their propaganda to the next level by publishing a study that claims to confirm what the industry has been saying all along—that drinking diet soda will help you lose weight. Growing awareness of the health dangers associated with soda, both regular and diet, has pushed beverage sales into a freefall. If drinking diet soda interferes with this system, then over the long term you're taking something away that protects your cardiovascular health, and that could be what's contributing to these effects." Furthermore, with so much evidence weighing against the safety and effectiveness of diet soda, whether for weight loss or any other disease prevention, the featured industry-funded study really offers no scientifically relevant evidence at all that might shift the balance in diet soda's favor. Unfortunately for anyone who has fallen for the false advertising, diet soda actually tends to promote weight gain, and numerous studies that were NOT funded by industry attest to this. Here, researchers showed that saccharin and aspartame both cause greater weight gain than sugar, even when the total caloric intake remains similar. This report highlights the fact that diet soda drinkers suffer the same exact health problems as those who opt for regular soda, such as excessive weight gain, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and stroke . The Growing Up Today Study, 30 which included more than 11,650 children aged 9-14, also found a positive association between diet soda consumption and weight gain in boys. Besides decimating the claim that diet soda is a useful diet aid, studies have also linked diet drinks and artificial sweeteners to a number of other, more serious health hazards, including increased risk of stroke and cancer. "This study suggests that diet soda is not an optimal substitute for sugar-sweetened beverages, and may be associated with a greater risk of stroke, myocardial infarction, or vascular death than regular soda." One lifetime feeding study published in 2010 34 found that aspartame induced cancers of the liver and lung in male mice. The most comprehensive and longest human study — spanning 22 years — that has ever looked at aspartame toxicity was published in 2012. Despite mounting evidence showing that artificial sweeteners as a group have adverse health effects, the FDA has just approved yet another artificial sweetener called Advantame, 38 , 39  derived from a combination of aspartame and vanillin. more...



Diet Soda - How Healthy Is It? - Women to Women

Diet soda may not have the sugar or calories of regular soda, but it’s chock-full of other health-draining chemicals, like caffeine, artificial sweeteners, sodium and phosphoric acid. And while I admit that diet soda may have its uses in the short term — particularly if you are dealing with a sugar addiction — I encourage you to resist it as your default beverage, especially if you are trying to lose weight. If you really want to do something good for your body and your BMI, exchange that can of diet soda for a cool glass of filtered water. What’s more, the 150 calories and nine teaspoons of sugar you forego in a diet soda are replaced with a host of other additives enlisted to make the beverage taste good and still provide a boost. Additionally, caffeine is a diuretic, so while you may be thinking that a diet soda quenches your thirst and helps keep you hydrated, the opposite is true. If you think I’m being an alarmist, try this experiment: Fill a glass with soda, diet or regular, and drop a nail into the glass. In the case of sugar addiction, weaning off of sugar with the help of diet soda and other artificial sweeteners can really help — but you may still have to deal with an addiction to caffeine. On the other hand, if you are like so many women and you simply can’t live without diet soda, have you thought of asking yourself why? With the hectic schedule so many of us keep, it’s possible that when you think you want a diet soda or sugary drink (or for that matter, an alcoholic beverage), you are simply thirsty. After a few days, you may find that with more water on board your craving for diet soda softens and slips away. Chemicals and caffeine don’t do this, no matter what the soda manufacturers tell you. If you find that you like the occasional sugared or diet soda, don’t be too hard on yourself. So take a few steps away from the habit of diet soda and see how you feel. more...



Study : Diet soda doesn't help you lose weight - USA TODAY

A Purdue University study has found that diet sodas may be linked to a number of health problems from obesity to diabetes to heart disease, just like their more sugary counterparts. Study: Diet soda doesn't help you lose weight A Purdue University study has found that diet sodas may be linked to a number of health problems from obesity to diabetes to heart disease, just like their more sugary counterparts. Purdue study finds diet soda may be linked to health problems from obesity to diabetes to heart disease. Diet soda, it turns out, may not be the panacea for weight loss that we all thought. Some studies that were reviewed suggest diet soda may be just as bad as non-diet. Diet soda, it turns out, may not be the panacea for weight loss that we all thought — and many of us hoped — it was. In fact, a Purdue University study has found that diet sodas may be linked to a number of health problems from obesity to diabetes to heart disease, just like their more sugary counterparts. Susie Swithers , a professor of psychological sciences and a behavioral neuroscientist, reviewed a number of recent studies looking at whether drinking diet soft drinks over the long-term increases the likelihood that a person will overeat, gain weight and then develop other health problems. Surprisingly, some of the studies suggested diet soda may be just as bad for our health as non-diet. While research indicating that diet soda might not be a health food has been around a few decades, in the past 25 years, Americans' consumption of these drinks have skyrocketed, among a proliferation of options and concerns over obesity. They are a safe and an effective tool in weight loss and weight management, according to decades of scientific research and regulatory agencies around the globe." “(Low-calorie sweeteners) are a safe and an effective tool in weight loss and weight management, according to decades of scientific research and regulatory agencies around the globe.” But when a person drinks diet soda the payoff never arrives. Of course, diet sodas are not the only places that artificial sweeteners creep into our diets. more...



Could Diet Soda Really Be Better Than Water For Weight

On one hand, as we've reported, long-term studies suggest that some diet soda drinkers' efforts to lose weight are stymied when they compensate for the zero-calorie beverages by eating more food. Now a new study , funded by the American Beverage Association, suggests that diet drinks might be more effective than water alone in helping dieters shed pounds. The other group was told to consume a combination of zero-calorie drinks (for example, diet soda or artificially sweetened teas) and water. That was 4 pounds more than the average of 9 pounds lost by those in the water group. "We were kind of surprised by the findings that showed that diet beverages actually did a little better than water" in the outcome, John Peters , one of the study authors, tells The Salt. "We did see that people in the diet-soda wing of the study reported less hunger during the trial than those in the water group," says Peters. Peters tells me he's aware that people are questioning the results. And he's surprised by that reaction to the study so far: "I'm kind of amazed how much people are trying to find a reason not to believe these findings." "We responded to a [request for proposal] that was put out by the ABA to the scientific community" to study the effects of diet drinks, he says. But, Peters explains, he and the other researchers made an agreement with the industry group in advance that whatever the findings — positive or negative — the results would be submitted for publication. She points out that the paper does not include detailed information about what participants consumed in lieu of diet soda beyond the water they were told to drink. more...



Diet Soda Causes Weight Gain - Reader's Digest

Let’s face it: No one drinks diet soda for the taste. People drink diet soda in the hopes that it will help them lose weight—or at least keep them from gaining it. Study subjects who drank two or more diet sodas a day had waist size increases that were six times greater than those of people who didn’t drink diet soda, said researchers from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. “What we saw was that the more diet sodas a person drinks, the more weight they were likely to gain,” said epidemiologist Sharon Fowler of the University of Texas Health Science Center. No one knows for sure yet, but it could be that people think they can eat more if they drink diet soda, and so overcompensate for the missing calories. “Data from this and other prospective studies suggest that the promotion of diet sodas and artificial sweeteners as healthy alternatives may be ill-advised,” said study researcher Helen P. more...



Dieting? Why you should ditch the diet soda

Why you should ditch the diet soda. Someone bellies up to the fast food counter and orders a Whopper with cheese, large fries  and diet soda — as if a zero-calorie chaser can compensate for the 1,300 calorie overload. Many of us justify a diet drink habit as a way to cut calories and lose weight. “Swapping sugary, high calorie beverages for low- or no-calorie artificially sweetened beverages like diet soda can potentially help you cut calories and lose weight,” says Marisa Moore, R. Substituting a soda with artificial sweeteners for a sugary beverage can help lower calorie intake, but there’s no evidence it helps you keep off the pounds in the long-term, a recent review of hundreds of studies on non-calorie sweeteners, appetite and food intake published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition indicated. In fact, two recent studies found that being a diet soda junkie could actually put you at a greater risk of weight gain . Normal weight people who drank 3 servings or more of diet soda a day — at least 21 weekly servings — were at almost double the risk for becoming overweight or obese after seven to eight years compared to people who skipped diet drinks, according to researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. And people who consumed at least one daily serving of diet soda (versus none) were more likely to develop a high waist circumference, a condition linked with diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease, according to a recent study. The American Dietetic Association says there's no conclusive evidence that diet sodas directly cause weight gain, but at least one expert believes an artificial sweetener habit may overstimulate our taste receptors for sweetness. David Ludwig, director of the Optimal Weight for Life Program at Children’s Hospital in Boston, cites animal studies that suggest consuming diet drinks alone (not with food) can confuse or disrupt the body’s ability to determine calorie content based on sweetness. Vote: Do you drink diet soda? Of course, it’s possible that if people in the studies who drank diet soda didn’t do so, they might have gained even more weight, especially if instead they turned to sugary beverages or consumed food instead of the diet soda. And if you eat a basically healthful diet with minimal amounts of sugary foods or artificial sweeteners, enjoying an occasional or even daily diet soda won't likely tip the scale. As for me, I admit not a day goes by that I don’t have a diet soda. I try to drink a cup of water before I have any diet soda and buy one can at a time — instead of a 6-pack or case —  to have at home or at my office. more...



Why Is Diet Soda Bad? - POPSUGAR Fitness

Why Is Diet Soda Bad? I'm always surprised at how many people ask me if diet soda is really that bad for you. It messes with your skin: Studies have shown that a regular soda habit has been linked to accelerated aging . It alters your mood: The aspartame found in diet soda has been linked to headaches, dizzy spells, and even mood swings. It increases your risk of heart attack: One University of Miami study found that folks who drank diet soda every day were 44 percent more likely to suffer a heart attack than those who abstained from drinking soda. more...



Diet Soda and Weight Gain

The result: the increase in waist circumference among daily diet soda drinkers was more than triple that of non-drinkers. "Constantly ingesting this might create an even more acidic environment in your gut than normal, which may affect biodiversity and allow some harmful strains of bacteria to thrive," says lead study author Sharon Fowler. A large French study found an increased risk of diabetes in diet soda drinkers, and among people with more acid-forming diets. Artificial sweeteners also may play a big role, and there are a few ways in which they may exert their negative effects, says Fowler. more...



Does Diet Soda Really Cause Weight Gain? What Experts Say

“Drink More Diet Soda, Gain More Weight?” asks one headline. “Diet Soda: Doorway to Weight Gain” shouts another. The sole exception was the Wikipedia entry for "diet soda," which also cited the weight gain concerns. If you believe what you read on the Internet, it’s clear that drinking diet sodas causes weight gain, right? Diet Soda, Weight Gain Evidence Scant. Popkin, who heads the division of nutrition epidemiology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, says none of the studies makes a convincing case that no-calorie sodas contribute to weight gain. more...



How diet soda can sabotage your diet

And you have to see the calorie count on that muffin in Starbucks whether you want to or not. Swapping sugary drinks for diet drinks may condition the body to expect calories, which makes people feel hungrier. “But the body produces physiological responses — increasing metabolism and releasing hormones — to anticipate the arrival of sugar and calories,” she says. That, Swithers says, can become a problem for diet soda fanatics. One theory: Drinking artificial sweeteners may cause the body to store more calories in fat cells and also induce hunger, she says. Diet soda consumption in the U. In fact, overweight and obese adults drink more diet beverages than healthy-weight adults — yet still consume significantly more food calories than overweight and obese adults who drink sugar-sweetened beverages, a study published in the January 2014 “ American Journal of Public Health ” found. It looked at cross-sectional data of nearly 24,000 Americans over a 10-year period, says co-author Sara Bleich, associate professor of health policy at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore “The folks that drink diet sodas consume a lot more calories,” she says. Others disagree: A body of research supports that low-calorie sweeteners, such as those found in diet beverages, can help reduce calorie intake and aid in maintaining a healthy weight, a spokeswoman for the American Beverage Association says. “There are a number of studies that show the benefits of diet beverages, which are 99% water,” she adds. One 2012 study published in the “ American Journal of Clinical Nutrition ” suggests people can use diet beverages to lose weight, she adds. One recent study published in the May 2014 edition of “ Obesity ” found that 150 people lost 13 pounds drinking diet soda as part of a 12-week weight-loss program, while 150 people who drank water only lost 9 pounds. People in the study who drank diet soda actually reported being less hungry, Peters says. Of course, the study was only 12 weeks long and was conducted as part of a weight management program, so Bleich says it’s no surprise they lost weight. But it’s also unrealistic to study people drinking diet sodas in an uncontrolled — real world — setting and expect them to lose weight, he says. more...



How Diet Soda Makes You Fat - Dr. Mark Hyman

They are food and diet industry propaganda that make and keep us fat and sick. WHAT THE FOOD AND DIET INDUSTRY DOESN’T WANT YOU TO KNOW. Diet Soda and Diet Drinks Make You Fat and Cause Type 2 Diabetes. You might say that people who are overweight and just about to get diabetes drink more diet soda, but they scientifically controlled for body weight. The diet and food industry has brainwashed us to eat fat-free foods, which seems like common sense. This was the beginning of our obesity and diabetes epidemic. But the science has proven that eating fat doesn’t make you fat – SUGAR does. Their metabolism was slower than the group eating the higher fat and higher protein diet. Our taste buds have been hijacked by the food and diet industry. We are held hostage by the food industry and we blame ourselves. And sugar is the worst culprit. So we have to take back our taste buds, take back our brain chemistry, and take back our bodies from the food and diet industry. The food industry and diet industry push exercise. more...



Can Diet Soda Make You Gain Weight? - CBS News

Can Diet Soda Make You Gain Weight? Emily Senay reports, some experts are now saying diet soda may be doing the exact opposite: making them gain weight. "What we saw was that the more diet sodas a person drinks, the more weight they were likely to gain," she says. "When we would switch them on to diet soda off regular soda, we weren't seeing weight loss necessarily, and that was confusing to us," Rogers says. But why would diet soda make some people gain weight? And Tomczak says, "I'm drinking the diet soda and you know let me have that hamburger and fries, instead of just the hamburger alone." If diet soda really doesn't take the weight off, it wouldn't be the first time a diet product failed to perform as expected. "So we're wondering are we seeing a similar phenomenon with the diet soda." In the meantime, there are alternatives for people who are trying to lose weight. more...



30 - Day No Soda Challenge - Home - Skinny Ms

Do this challenge for yourself and we will help motivate you and provide support along the way. Start a Soda Bowl – Grab a bowl and each day add the money you would typcially spend on sodas to the bowl.  You can’t spend this money for the entire month of August. This also helps with getting the sugar you might be craving and will help make your challenge successful. The challenge lasts for 30 days from the day you start. For example, if you normally drink 3 sodas a day begin to reduce your intake by doing the following: You get the idea. Q:  If I slip up and have a soda does that mean I’m out of the challenge?  Slip ups are just that and we want you to continue with the challenge regardless. We decided to make August the ‘No Soda Challenge’ month because of the overwhelming requests from so many of you to go forward with this challenge. The goal of this challenge is to break the soda addiction.  Having a soda ever now and again, is not the same as having to have 3 and 4 sodas each day. We recommend you do the research and decide for yourself. more...



Diet soda and weight loss : New study reignites debate

Diet soda and weight loss: New study reignites debate. The results contradict a number of other recent studies that indicated drinking diet soda may actually cause a person to gain weight. The researchers found people in the diet soda group lost an average of 13 pounds over the 12-week time period, while those who didn't drink diet beverages only lost 9 pounds. This added up to 44 percent more weight loss among the diet soda drinkers than the control group. Additionally, 64 percent of the diet soda drinkers lost a minimum of 5 percent of their body weight, compared with only 43 percent of the people who didn't drink diet soda. The researchers also found people in the diet soda group reported feeling less hungry and showed improvements in serum levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoproteins, or "bad" cholesterol. more...



Ask the Diet Doctor : Can Drinking Diet Soda Make You Fat

While drinking diet soda every day isn't exactly good for your health, the chances of it sabotaging your weight-loss efforts are slim. The common misconception regarding the role of diet soda and weight gain comes from a couple of studies that received a lot of media attention. Another study published in 2008 also found an association between diet soda consumption and metabolic syndrome. The interesting thing about this particular study was that drinking diet soda was linked to a higher risk for developing metabolic syndrome than drinking sugar-sweetened beverages. There are two primary schools of thought: The first is that diet soda alone does not cause weight gain , but it has more to do with the unhealthy habits of diet soda drinkers—the sum of which leads to weight gain. The second school of thought is that the artificial sweeteners in diet soda mess with your body's chemical processing, causing you to eat more and consequently gain weight. The stance I take with my clients trying to lose weight: If diet soda is going to be your one vice, that's fine. If you're doing everything else with your diet and exercise correctly, you will lose weight. Having the occasional diet soda won’t stop you from achieving your goals or the body you've always wanted. more...



Diet soda helps weight loss, industry - funded study finds

Researchers from the University of Texas found that over the course of about a decade, diet soda drinkers had a 70% greater increase in waist circumference compared with non-drinkers. The correlation held true for both regular and diet drinks, but researchers were sure to note that the risk appeared to be greater for those who primarily drank diet sodas and fruit punches. It may be bad for your bones – Women over 60 are already at a greater risk for osteoporosis than men, and Tufts University researchers found that drinking soda, including diet soda, compounds the problem. Their study found that diet soda devotees were 43% more likely to have experienced a vascular event than those who drank none. But why was the diet soda group more successful? So while this study did not track calorie consumption, the group blocked from drinking diet sodas most likely ate (or drank) more calories over the course of the 12-week diet. Swithers authored a report last year that found that diet soda drinkers have the same health issues as those who drink regular soda. It found that people who drink diet soda may be "at increased risk of excessive weight gain, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease," according to the study. "It makes sense that it would have been harder for the water group to adhere to the overall diet than the (artificially-sweetened beverage) group," says Hill. In short, this study addresses the question of whether a regular diet soda drinker should attempt to kick his or her habit while also attempting to lose weight, not whether we should all drink more diet soda in order to lose weight. Kristi Norton, a regular diet soda drinker before the study began, was assigned to the group that required her to kick the habit. "And I can feel the difference now when I drink a diet drink, I can feel this 'heaviness'." more...



Artificial Sweeteners In Diet Soda Affect Gut Bacteria and

First, they found that mice that drank water with the artificial sweeteners saccharin, aspartame, and sucralose developed glucose intolerance. Unsurprisingly, a group of mice fed just plain water didn't develop glucose intolerance, but neither did a group of mice fed water with regular sugar—strange, considering that high-sugar diets are at the root of many cases of type 2 diabetes . MORE: The 5 Best (and 5 Worst) Sweeteners to Have in Your Kitchen. Next, the researchers manipulated the mice's gut bacteria composition to determine the effects of artificial sugars on glucose intolerance. They found that if they killed off most of the bacteria in the mice's digestive tracts in the group given artificial sweeteners, the glucose intolerance went away. Analyzing the data from the Personalized Nutrition Project , they found a significant correlation between reported consumption of artificial sweeteners, gut bacteria configurations, and an inclination to developing glucose intolerance. After only a week of consuming artificial sweeteners, the participants started showing glucose intolerance, and gut bacteria composition had changed. Gerard Mullin, MD, author of the book The Good Gut Diet , knows that a happy gut is the key to metabolic health. more...



What You Need to Know About Diet Soda and Weight Loss

What You Need to Know About Diet Soda and Weight Loss. Experts are split on whether diet soda can help you lose weight. You probably heard about a new study published in the journal Obesity, which says diet drinks can help people lose more weight than drinking plain water. But you’ve probably also read time and time again that diet soda drinkers are more likely to be obese. One group drank water, and the other downed diet soda. After 12 weeks, the diet soda drinkers lost 5.95 kg (about 13 pounds) compared to 4.09 kg (just under 9 pounds) for those who drank water. The study authors speculate that the water group may have lost less weight because they indulged their sweet cravings with foods that, unlike diet soda, contained calories—including yogurt, cookies, and ice cream. We’ve all heard about the dangers of excess sugar, and regular soda is the top source in the American diet. So if you’re trying to lose weight, I say stick with good old H 2 O; and if you have a sweet tooth, manage it in savvy ways that involve enjoying real, natural foods. Finding balance and eating in ways that make you feel nourished, energized, and well are the real keys to a healthy body and a healthy weight. more...



5 Diet Myths Making You Gain Weight - The Dr. Oz Show

5 Diet Myths Making You Gain Weight. The diet strategies you swear by may be flawed. Oz reveals 5 diet-destroying myths that may be hindering you from achieving the weight-loss you desire. Could the diet you're on right now be full of lies and misinformation that are making you pack on the pounds? Many of the things you've been taught about dieting may be stopping you from reaching your ideal weight. Oz reveals the shocking truth about the dieting tips you swear by. Diet Myth #1: Diet Soda Helps You Lose Weight  As your body gets “tricked” by the sugar substitute, you crave more food and become susceptible to overeating in order to feel satisfied. Diet Myth #2: The More Calories You Cut, the More Weight You Lose. Because 3500 calories equals about 1 pound of fat, you would need to cut 3500 calories out of your diet each week to lose 1 pound a week. more...



Diet soda better than water for weight loss

Diet soda better than water for weight loss, study says. A new study finds that people lost more weight while on diet drinks — such as soda and tea — compared to those who stuck to water. Diet soda might have a bad reputation, but a new study in Obesity is praising that and other diet beverages for their weight-loss benefits. The study found that people lose more weight on diet drinks than on water. The researchers found that those on diet beverages lost an average of 13 pounds — 44 percent more than those who drank water (they lost, on average, 9 pounds). "This study clearly demonstrates diet beverages can in fact help people lose weight, directly countering myths in recent years that suggest the opposite effect — weight gain," said James O. "In fact, those who drank diet beverages lost more weight and reported feeling significantly less hungry than those who drank water alone. "There's so much misinformation about diet beverages that isn't based on studies designed to test cause and effect, especially on the internet," said John C. "The results of our study show that if you are trying to shed some pounds and want to drink diet sodas, they will not affect your ability to lose weight," Peters told She Knows. Peters said that drinking water isn't bad for you; they just noted that people experienced more significant weight-loss results when drinking diet soda was a choice. "Neither one contributes calories to our diet, and there are no ingredients in diet beverages that trigger satiety," he said. Those may not be a preference for diet beverage drinkers, but he says they are the best bet. more...



Drinking Sodas after Weight Loss Surgery - Weight Loss

Drinking Sodas after Weight Loss Surgery. Soda should be avoided after any form of gastric weight loss surgery because it can cause several problems. You will need to avoid carbonated drinks of all kinds for a minimum of three months after weight loss surgery. They can slow down weight loss. This is the healthiest possible beverage choice, and it’s best to constantly carry a bottle of water to encourage you to drink the 64 ounces of fluids you’ll need to stay hydrated after weight loss surgery. When you’re looking for something to quench your thirst, remember the problems that soda can cause after weight loss surgery—choose one of these alternatives instead. Bariatric surgery is not for the casual dieter and there are several requirements that you will need to meet in order to be considered. You qualify for weight loss surgery however, you do not qualify for insurance coverage. Your do not qualify for weight loss surgery. You qualify for weight loss surgery with insurance. You qualify for weight loss surgery but additional information is needed to confirm whether or not it will be covered by your insurance. You qualify for weight loss surgery. You qualify for weight loss surgery covered by your insurance. more...



Diet Soda Linked To Weight Gain - The Huffington Post

And a second study shows that aspartame - an artificial sweetener in diet soda - actually raises blood sugar in mice prone to diabetes. "Data from this and other prospective studies suggest that the promotion of diet sodas and artificial sweeteners as healthy alternatives may be ill-advised," study researcher Helen P. In the first study, researchers collected height, weight, waist circumference and diet soda intake data from 474 elderly people who participated in the San Antonio Longitudinal Study of Aging. Researchers found that the diet soda drinkers had waist circumference increases of 70 percent greater than those who non-diet soda drinkers. And people who drank diet soda the most frequently - at least two diet sodas a day - had waist circumference increases that were 500 percent greater than people who didn't drink any diet soda, the study said. Researchers for this study found that diabetes-prone mice that were fed a diet that included aspartame for three months, had higher blood glucose levels than mice not given aspartame. more...



The Number of Pounds You'll Lose if You Stop Drinking Soda

The Number of Pounds You Might Lose if You Stop Drinking Soda. Now check the list below to see what happens when you replace that soda with water. The Number of Pounds You Might Lose When You Eliminate Soda. If you replace your daily Double Gulp with water, you reduce your annual calorie intake by 209,875 calories or almost 60 pounds in a year. If you replace your daily Super Big Gulp with water, you reduce your annual calorie intake by 167,900 calories or almost 48 pounds per year. If you replace your daily Big Gulp with water, you reduce your annual calorie intake by 125,925 calories or 36 pounds per year. If you replace your daily Gulp with water, you reduce your annual calorie intake by 83,950 or calories or 24 pounds per year. If you replace your daily large Coca Cola at Mc Donald's, you reduce your annual calorie intake by 113,150 or calories or 32 pounds per year. If you replace your daily medium Coca Cola at Mc Donalds (16 oz), you reduce your annual calorie intake by 54,750 calories or just over 15 pounds per year. If you replace your daily 12 ounce can of Coke with water every day, you save 51,100 calories per year or about 15 pounds per year. So how do you kick the soda habit? Gradually increase your water intake and decrease the soda. more...



Diet drink - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In 1963, The Coca-Cola Company joined the diet soft drink market with Tab , which proved to be a huge success. Diet 7 Up was released in 1963 under the name Like. ] feel the opposite—that diet drinks have no aftertaste and that drinks sweetened by high fructose corn syrup have a gritty, over-sweet aftertaste[ citation needed ]. Diet Coke is the number one selling diet soft drink in the world. The first artificial sweeteners used in diet soft drinks were cyclamates (often synergistically with saccharin). The ban was lifted in 1991, but by that time, virtually all diet soft drink production had shifted to using aspartame. Diet Rite is the non-aspartame diet soft drink brand with the highest sales today; it uses a combination of sucralose and acesulfame potassium. (This idea was first floated by Diet Coke in 1984, with the tagline, "Just For the Taste of It.") Amount of artificial sweeteners in diet soft drinks[ edit ] [5] [6] The effectiveness of diet soft drinks as a weight loss tool has also been called into question. Overall, the percentage consuming diet drinks was higher among females compared with males. The percentage consuming diet drinks was similar for females and males at all ages except among 12- to 19-year-olds, where a higher percentage of females than males consumed diet drinks. more...




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