Diagnosis code for weight loss management


Obesity Tests and diagnosis - Mayo Clinic

Obesity. Defining overweight and obesity. 2013 AHA/ACC/TOS guideline for the management of overweight and obesity in adults. Pathogenesis of obesity. What are overweight and obesity? Obesity in adults: Etiology and natural history. Obesity in adults: Health hazards. Understanding adult overweight and obesity. Screening for and management of obesity in adults: U. Obesity in adults: Drug therapy. Treatment of obesity: The impact of bariatric surgery. more...



Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

The major feature in NASH is fat in the liver, along with inflammation and damage. Most people with NASH feel well and are not aware that they have a liver problem. The only means of proving a diagnosis of NASH and separating it from simple fatty liver is a liver biopsy. NASH is diagnosed when examination of the tissue with a microscope shows fat along with inflammation and damage to liver cells. Or NASH can slowly worsen, causing scarring or “fibrosis” to appear and accumulate in the liver. Liver transplantation is the only treatment for advanced cirrhosis with liver failure, and transplantation is increasingly performed in people with NASH. NASH ranks as one of the major causes of cirrhosis in America, behind hepatitis C and alcoholic liver disease. Weight loss can improve liver tests in patients with NASH and may reverse the disease to some extent. The newer antidiabetic medications make the body more sensitive to insulin and may help reduce liver injury in patients with NASH. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is fat in the liver, with inflammation and damage. NASH can lead to cirrhosis, a condition in which the liver is permanently damaged and cannot work properly. more...



Getting Paid : New Diagnosis Codes Take Effect Oct. 1

For example, V 76.8, “Special screening for malignant neoplasms, other neoplasm,” will be deleted. V 76.46 Special screening for malignant neoplasms, ovary; V 76.47 Special screening for malignant neoplasms, vagina; V 76.50 Special screening for malignant neoplasms, unspecified intestine; V 76.51 Special screening for malignant neoplasms, colon; V 76.52 Special screening for malignant neoplasms, small intestine; V 76.89 Special screening for other malignant neoplasm. Deleting V 82.8, “Special screening for other specified conditions,” and adding V 82.81, “Special screening for osteoporosis,” and V 82.89, “Special screening for other specified conditions.” These include 645.00, “Prolonged pregnancy, unspecified as to episode of care or not applicable,” 645.01, “Prolonged pregnancy, delivered, with or without mention of antepartum condition,” and 645.03, “Prolonged pregnancy, antepartum condition or complication.” In lieu of these codes, the following new diagnosis codes will be available: A new code, 477.1, will be added for “Allergic rhinitis, due to food.” Also, code V 15.0, “Allergy, other than to medicinal agents,” will be deleted in favor of more specific codes, including the following: The code for “Other symptoms involving nervous and musculoskeletal systems,” 781.9, will be deleted in favor of two new codes: 781.91, “Loss of height,” and 781.92, “Abnormal posture.” Finally, 783.4, “Lack of expected normal physiological development,” will be deleted and replaced by the following new codes: more...



Weight Management and Blood Pressure

Maintaining a healthy weight provides many health benefits. If you are overweight, losing as little as five to ten pounds may help lower your blood pressure. Find out whether losing some weight may help you lower your blood pressure with our High Blood Pressure Risk Calculator . Ideally, you should strive to maintain a healthy weight. If your doctor recommends that you lose weight, there are a variety of healthcare professionals who can help get you on the right track. The two essentials to maintaining a healthy weight are: more...



Coverage of Obesity Treatment : A State - by - State Analysis

Coverage of Obesity Treatment: A State-by-State Analysis of Medicaid and State Insurance Laws. We determined whether state Medicaid programs cover recommended treatments for adult and pediatric obesity and to what extent states regulate the treatment and coverage of obesity by private insurers. Very few states ensure coverage of recommended treatments for adult and pediatric obesity through Medicaid or private insurance. In fact, in 2004, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) removed language from the Medicare Coverage Issues Manual stating obesity was not an illness. Few studies have evaluated public and private insurance coverage of primary obesity treatment, especially at the state level. We conducted a state-by-state analysis of (1) Medicaid and EPSDT program coverage and payment practices for adult and pediatric obesity assessment and treatment, (2) the extent to which states prohibit or regulate insurers' medical underwriting or eligibility exclusion of obesity, and (3) the extent to which state insurance laws address coverage of obesity treatment. In previous studies of insurance coverage for obesity treatment, researchers utilized surveys to collect data from private insurers and state Medicaid programs. 17 – 21 We selected the following interventions for analysis of Medicaid coverage and payment practices for adults with obesity: nutritional assessment/counseling, drug therapy, and bariatric surgery. We reviewed provider manuals for (1) provider guidance for the assessment and treatment of obesity, (2) coverage and reimbursement of specific obesity-related treatments, and (3) explicit exclusions of obesity-related assessment or treatment. We found evidence that 26 state Medicaid programs covered nutritional assessment and consultation for obesity. Medicaid coverage of childhood obesity assessment and treatment. We found that in 45 states and the District of Columbia, no legislation protects individuals from being denied health insurance based on obesity or health status. The majority of state codes are silent on the coverage of obesity treatment for both the group and individual insurance markets. Our findings suggest that most states are not ensuring recommended screening and treatment of adults and children for obesity through Medicaid, the EPSDT program, or private insurance. Prevalence of overweight and obesity in the United States, 1999–2004. more...



Pancreatic Cancer : Diagnosis and Management

Pancreatic Cancer: Diagnosis and Management. The link between risk of pancreatic cancer and other factors (e.g., diabetes, obesity) is less clear. The American Cancer Society estimated that 31,860 Americans would be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2004, and that 31,270 would die from the disease. Pancreatic cancer rarely occurs in persons younger than 50 years, and the risk increases with age. Cancer of the pancreas and biliary tract. Accuracy of Imaging Studies for the Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer. Surgical resection is the only potentially curative treatment for patients with pancreatic cancer, although many patients are not candidates for resection. A prospective study of cigarette smoking and the risk of pancreatic cancer. Physical activity, obesity, height, and the risk of pancreatic cancer. Association between nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug use and the incidence of pancreatic cancer. Hereditary pancreatitis and the risk of pancreatic cancer. Clinical presentation and ultrasonography in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. more...



Weight - Loss Surgery - American Nurses Association

In the uncomplicated patient with a lesser BMI, skin and wound care are straightforward and uncomplicated. In the obese patient, additional assessment, interventions, and monitoring are required. New Applications for Endoscopy: The Emerging Field of Endoluminal and Transgastric Bariatric Surgery. The Emerging Field of Endoluminal and Transgastric Bariatric Surgery. American Society for the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Preoperative preparation of the bariatric surgery patient. Perioperative management of the bariatric surgery patient: Focus on cardiac and anesthesia considerations. Assessment and management of the obese patient. Nursing care of the bariatric surgery patient. Perioperative management of the bariatric surgery patient. more...



Obamacare requires most insurers to tackle obesity

Screening and counseling for obesity is covered under a preventive services benefit of the Affordable Care Act, but what health plans offer patients varies. Obamacare requires most insurers to tackle obesity Screening and counseling for obesity is covered under a preventive services benefit of the Affordable Care Act, but what health plans offer patients varies. But now most insurance plans are required to help obese patients try to lose weight under President Obama's health care law. Screening and counseling for obesity has to be covered with no patient cost-sharing (co-payments, co-insurance or deductibles) by most insurers under the preventive services benefit of the Affordable Care Act, says Susan Pisano, a spokeswoman for America's Health Insurance Plans, the national trade association representing the health insurance industry. Under a provision of the law, some grandfathered plans don't have to cover obesity screening and treatment if they haven't changed their overall coverage since 2010 when the law was passed. So, for the plans that have to cover obesity, if a health care provider screens a patient's BMI (body mass index, a number that takes into account height and weight) and determines that the patient is obese, then the provider may offer initial weight-loss guidance and refer the patient to a professional service. Obesity insurance coverage decisions for clinical preventive services under the Affordable Care Act are based on recommendations from the U. It recommended screening for obesity and offering intensive counseling help at the doctor's office or referring patients out for weight-loss help, says pediatrician David Grossman, a task force member. Under the health care law, plans can have doctors do the weight-loss counseling or "use medically appropriate" alternatives to meet the requirement, says Karen Miller-Kovach, chief scientific officer for Weight Watchers. She says some insurers are using Weight Watchers for patient referrals. For counseling to be reimbursed, patients have to show progress with weight loss, she says. Although she applauds Medicare's efforts, she says several major research studies show that patients lose a significant amount of weight when they work in a comprehensive lifestyle program of skill-building in dietary and exercise habits under the guidance of a registered dietitian, a trained health coach, exercise specialist or psychologist. "I'm in Appalachia, and I'd say 90% of the people we see have a weight issue, and it's all related to food," he says. Sometimes fine-tuning prescriptions for diabetes medications or other prescriptions that they might have can help patients lose weight. more...



Icd code for weight loss surgery - Loss surgery

To Support Bariatric Surgery. CPT and ICD-9 Codes for Bariatric Surgery. 32/150.3 ICD - 9/Diagnosis Codes for Bariatric Surgery. Appendix A: Definitions of Bariatric Surgery. Bariatric surgery (CPT Codes 43644, 43645, 43770, 43771, 43773, . Bariatric surgery coverage. V 45.86 Bariatric surgery status - ICD-9-CM Vol. Gastric Bypass Outcomes | Gastric Bypass | Weight Loss Surgery. Bariatric surgery (weight loss surgery. Icd code for weight loss surgery. Gastric band attached; History of bariatric (weight loss) surgery; History of bariatric surgery; History of diabetes mellitus resolved post bariatric surgery. Find potential weight loss and health improvement results with bariatric surgery. History of bariatric (weight loss) surgery; History of bariatric surgery; History of bariatric surgery (situation) History of diabetes mellitus. more...



Prediabetes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Impaired fasting glycaemia or impaired fasting glucose (IFG) refers to a condition in which the fasting blood glucose is elevated above what is considered normal levels but is not high enough to be classified as diabetes mellitus . Fasting blood glucose levels are in a continuum within a given population, with higher fasting glucose levels corresponding to a higher risk for complications caused by the high glucose levels. Impaired fasting glucose is defined as a fasting glucose that is higher than the upper limit of normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes mellitus. World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for impaired fasting glucose differs from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) criteria, because the normal range of glucose is defined differently by each. Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is a pre- diabetic state of dysglycemia , that is associated with insulin resistance and increased risk of cardiovascular pathology. Patients should monitor for signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes mellitus. These are associated with insulin resistance and are risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus . Of the two, impaired glucose tolerance better predicts cardiovascular disease and mortality . Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a group of metabolic diseases that are characterised by hyperglycaemia and defects in insulin production in the pancreas and/or impaired tolerance to insulin effects. The presence of glucose in the bloodstream triggers the production and release of insulin from the pancreas' beta islet cells. Intensive weight loss and lifestyle intervention, if sustained, may improve glucose tolerance substantially and prevent progression from IGT to type 2 diabetes. The progression to type 2 diabetes mellitus is not inevitable for those with prediabetes. The progression into diabetes mellitus from prediabetes is approximately 25% over three to five years. S in the age group 40–74 years, 33.8% had IFG, 15.4% had IGT, and 40.1% had prediabetes (IFG, IGT, or both). more...



Weight Gain Prior to Diagnosis and Survival from Breast Cancer

Background: To examine the effects of prediagnostic obesity and weight gain throughout the life course on survival after a breast cancer diagnosis, we conducted a follow-up study among a population-based sample of women diagnosed with first, primary invasive, and in situ breast cancer between 1996 and 1997 (n = 1,508). Women diagnosed with postmenopausal breast cancer who gained more than 12.7 kg after age of 50 years up to the year before diagnosis had a 2- to 3-fold increased risk of death due to all-causes (HR, 2.69; 95% CI, 1.63-4.43) and breast cancer (HR, 2.95; 95% CI, 1.36-6.43). We investigated the effects of prediagnostic adult weight and weight change on mortality among women with breast cancer who participated in the population-based Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project (LIBCSP). Because there were very few cases considered to be underweight (BMI 12.7 kg after the age of 50 years had an increased risk of breast cancer death (HR, 2.95; 95% CI, 1.36-6.43) after adjustment for age at diagnosis, history of hypertension, and weight at age 50 years. However, there was an observed increased risk of overall and breast cancer death among postmenopausal women when comparing weight gain > 5 kg between the ages of 40 and 50 years to those who did not gain weight (overall death HR, 2.69; 95% CI, 1.25-5.79; breast cancer death HR, 2.73; 95% CI, 0.89-8.43). In this population-based study of 1,508 with incident breast cancer with a median of 5.84 years of follow-up, we found that BMI at diagnosis and adult weight gain before diagnosis were associated with increased breast cancer–specific and overall mortality among both women who were premenopausal and postmenopausal at the time of diagnosis. Among women with a postmenopausal breast cancer diagnosis, we also found that high levels of weight gain during the perimenopausal and postmenopausal years were strongly associated with decreased survival after a breast cancer diagnosis. We found that a high BMI and body weight at the time of diagnosis was associated with over a 2-fold increase in mortality among women who were premenopausal at the time of breast cancer diagnosis. Our results are similar to those found in two previous studies that have observed a stronger association between mortality and obesity among women who were premenopausal at the time of their breast cancer diagnosis than those who were postmenopausal ( 8 , 25 ). Our results for prediagnostic weight and weight gain over the adult life course are compatible to another study that also investigated adult weight gain on breast cancer survival. The 2-fold increase in the HR for breast cancer mortality among postmenopausal women seen in our analysis for weight gain in the years leading up to menopause, from age 40 to 50 years, is consistent with this hypothesis. more...



WHO - About diabetes

Patients are usually not obese with this type of diabetes, but obesity is not incompatible with the diagnosis. Patients are at increased risk of developing microvascular and macrovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by the presence of classic symptoms of hyperglycemia and an abnormal blood test. Patients usually do not require lifelong insulin but can control blood glucose with diet and exercise alone, or in combination with oral medications, or with the addition of insulin. Usually (but not always) develops in adulthood (and is on the rise in children and adolescents). As in T 1 D, patients are at a higher risk of microvascular and macrovascular complications. May have increased urinary frequency (polyuria), thirst (polydipsia), hunger (polyphagia), and unexplained weight loss. Some asymptomatic patients are diagnosed through "opportunistic screening" of high risk groups (at a routine medical visit, the health care provider may identify the patient as being at higher risk of diabetes and recommend a screening test). Patients treated with diet/exercise, or with addition of one or more categories of oral medications, with a combination of oral medications and insulin, or with insulin alone. If fasting and postprandial blood sugars are elevated in the first trimester, this may indicate preexisting diabetes mellitus (which is considered a different condition, with different implications). Patient education about diet and exercise. more...



Abnormal Weight Loss. Uninentional weight

The presentation will depend on the underlying cause. A thorough history and examination are essential in establishing the underlying cause and identifying appropriate investigations. Renal function and electrolytes: may indicate chronic kidney disease, Addison's disease. Other investigations will depend on the context of the weight loss. Possible further investigations may include HIV serology, endoscopy and autoimmune disease screen. Management is otherwise directed at the cause of weight loss and may include physical, psychological and social (eg, 'meals at home scheme', respite care) interventions. Elderly patients with unintentional weight loss are at higher risk of infection and depression. more...



Weight Loss : Check Your Symptoms and Signs

What are the statistics for bile duct cancer? What is the treatment for bone cancer? What is the prognosis for bone cancer? What are the causes of colon cancer? What are the symptoms of colon cancer? What are the treatments and survival for colon cancer? What are the signs and symptoms of COPD? What are the risk factors for diabetes? What are the causes or risk factors for esophageal cancer? What are the symptoms and signs of esophageal cancer? What are the stages of esophageal cancer? What are the treatment for esophageal cancer? What are the symptoms of a stroke? What are the symptoms of type 2 diabetes? more...



Diagnosis and Management of Recurrent Pregnancy Loss

Diagnosis and Management of Recurrent Pregnancy Loss. Diagnosis and Management of Recurrent Pregnancy Loss                       Send Link. Recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) is one area of reproductive medicine that is filled with controversy and confusion. Traditionally, the diagnosis of recurrent pregnancy loss is not made until a woman has lost at least three pregnancies. And, if undetected or untreated, you may likely be at increased risk for a loss in a subsequent pregnancy. Some physicians and insurance companies argue that there is no point in initiating an evaluation for recurrent pregnancy loss unless your risk for miscarriage in a subsequent pregnancy is increased. Unfortunately, at least one in five who have lost two pregnancies will go and miscarry again and the other 4 are likely to worry needlessly that there may be an undetected reason for their miscarriages. While the most common cause for pregnancy loss is abnormal number of egg chromosomes, the parents usually have normal chromosomes. The parents with this condition are normal because they have all the normal chromosomal complement. The sperm and egg each end up with ½ the original set of chromosomes in a process called meiosis. Congenital uterine malformations such as a uterine septum may be associated with recurrent pregnancy loss. Surgical correction by operative hysteroscopy may restore fertility and allow the pregnancy to progress to term. The use of cervical cerclage (suture placed in the cervix) may reduce the risk of this pregnancy complication that can lead to loss. The result is placental insufficiency and miscarriage. Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin gene mutation, Antithrombin III and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) are genetically determined factors that may increase the risk of miscarriage. more...



Weight loss - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Weight loss. [1] [2] [3] [7] [8] [9] Poor nutrient utilization can lead to weight loss, and can be caused by fistulae in the gastrointestinal tract, diarrhea, drug-nutrient interaction, enzyme depletion and muscle atrophy. Unintentional weight loss can be the characteristic leading to diagnosis of diseases such as cancer [1] and type 1 diabetes . [7] Around 25% experience moderate to severe weight loss, and most others have some weight loss. [7] Greater weight loss is associated with poorer prognosis. People with HIV often experience weight loss, and it is associated with poorer outcomes. Medical treatment can directly or indirectly cause weight loss, impairing treatment effectiveness and recovery that can lead to further weight loss in a vicious cycle. Intentional weight loss is the loss of total body mass as a result of efforts to improve fitness and health, or to change appearance through slimming. Weight loss in individuals who are overweight or obese can reduce health risks, [19] increase fitness, [20] and may delay the onset of diabetes . Weight loss occurs when the body is expending more energy in work and metabolism than it is absorbing from food or other nutrients. The healthiest weight loss regimen, therefore, is one that consists of a balanced diet and moderate physical activity.[ citation needed ] The least intrusive weight loss methods, and those most often recommended, are adjustments to eating patterns and increased physical activity, generally in the form of exercise. In order for weight loss to be permanent, changes in diet and lifestyle must be permanent as well. more...



Weight Loss

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. No reproduction, transmission or display is permitted without the written permissions of Rodale Inc. With your existing account from. Your account has been deactivated. {* #social Registration Form *} {* email Address *} {* display Name *} By clicking "Sign in", you confirm that you accept our terms of service and have read and understand privacy policy . Already have an account? {* #registration Form *} {* email Address *} {* display Name *} {* new Password *} {* new Password Confirm *} By clicking "Create Account", you confirm that you accept our terms of service and have read and understand privacy policy . Please check your email and click on the link to activate your account. more...



Physician Reimbursement for Obesity Counseling

Intensive Behavioral Therapy for Obesity. Effective with dates of service November 29, 2011 and forward, Medicare beneficiaries with obesity are eligible for a series of face-to-face visits with a primary care physician. For these services, the Medicare Part B deductible and coinsurance are waived. One face-to-face visit every week for the first month. One face-to-face visit every month for months seven to 12, if the beneficiary meets the 3 kg (6.6 lbs) weight loss requirement during the first six months. At the six-month visit, a reassessment of obesity and a determination of the amount of weight loss should be performed. To be eligible for additional face-to-face visits occurring once a month for months seven to 12, beneficiaries must have achieved a reduction in weight of at least 3 kg (6.6 lbs), over the course of the first six months of intensive therapy. For beneficiaries who do not achieve a weight loss of at least 3 kg (6.6 lbs) during the first six months of intensive therapy, a reassessment of their readiness to change and BMI is appropriate after an additional six-month period. Intensive behavioral intervention for obesity should be consistent with the 5-A framework: When billing for these visits, the physician will use HCPCS code G 0447, and use one of the following ICD-9 codes for BMI 30.0 and over: V 85.30 through V 85.39, V 85.41 through V 85.45. more...



Weight Loss Counseling Supercoder - Ask an Expert

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Involuntary Weight Loss and Protein - Energy Malnutrition

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Obesity - Mayo Clinic

Obesity. Prescription medications and weight-loss surgery are additional options for treating obesity. Defining overweight and obesity. 2013 AHA/ACC/TOS guideline for the management of overweight and obesity in adults. Pathogenesis of obesity. What are overweight and obesity? Obesity in adults: Etiology and natural history. Obesity in adults: Health hazards. Understanding adult overweight and obesity. Screening for and management of obesity in adults: U. Obesity in adults: Drug therapy. Treatment of obesity: The impact of bariatric surgery. Gastric bypass for morbid obesity. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. Surgical management of severe obesity. more...



Cracking the Code : What You Need to Know About CPT Codes

The following is an overview of preventive medicine, diagnosis, procedure/service and counseling for surgeons and integrated health. The E/M evaluation for GERD was performed in the process of performing a preventive medicine evaluation and management service. In general, since the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) many previously denied preventive services are now covered services for the treatment of obesity, weight management, nutrition, and physical activity counseling. However, coverage and reimbursement for these services can depend on the type of provider submitting the claim, the procedure/service and diagnosis codes submitted, and the patient’s contract with the insurance company. The suggested coding for obesity screening and counseling includes 97802-97804, 99078, 99401-99404, 99411-99412, G 0447, G 0449, or S 9470 as prevention with 278.00. In addition to the two specific obesity codes, the provider may also bill for obesity or weight management counseling with routine diagnosis codes such as: Services for obesity/weight management counseling may be billed under E/M codes (99201-99215) provided that those services meet the components of an E/M service. These E/M codes are compatible with all causes, illness or routine related, and will pay according to the diagnosis submitted. Claims submitted with these procedure/service codes and a routine diagnosis code are processed according to the patient’s preventive benefit, provided the patient has coverage for preventive services. The provider may also submit codes for preventive counseling (99401-99404). Claims submitted with these procedure/service codes and a routine diagnosis code will process according to the patient’s preventive benefit, provided the patient has coverage for preventive services. When a bariatric patient comes into the office for a routine follow up visit and examination, preventive medicine codes or risk factor reduction services may be used to seek reimbursement for the time and effort put into those separate services. As long as service is clearly documented and distinct from the documentation of the preventive service, CPT suggests submitting a preventive medicine services code (99381-99397) for the routine exam and the appropriate office visit code (99201-99215) with modifier -25, “Significant, separately identifiable [E/M] service by the same physician on the same day of the procedure or other service,” attached to the problem-oriented service. The key to reimbursement for preventive medicine counseling and risk factor reduction services is documentation. more...



Newborn Weight Loss

To view all forums, post or create a new thread, you must be an AAPC Member . If you are a member and have already registered for member area and forum access , you can log in by clicking here . To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. What is the diagnosis for weight loss in a newborn. We are a Family Practice and the insurance company is stating "abnl weight loss" 783.21 is not age appropriate. By wartgow in forum Medical Coding General Discussion. By SHobbs in forum Diagnosis Coding. By cynthiar in forum Medical Coding General Discussion. You may not post new threads. You may not post replies. You may not post attachments. You may not edit your posts. Joining AAPC grants you unlimited access, allowing you to post questions and participate with our community of over 150,000 professionals. In addition to full participation on AAPC forums, as a member you will be able to: Please note that the opinions expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of AAPC. more...




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