Depression After Weight Loss


Depression, Binge Eating Common in Weight Loss Surgery

Depression and binge eating disorder were common among bariatric surgery patients. Note that there was conflicting evidence for an association between preoperative mental health conditions and weight loss after the surgery. Depression and binge eating disorder were common among bariatric surgery patients, according to a meta-analysis. Based on an analysis of data from 68 studies - 59 studies reporting on preoperative mental health conditions; 27 reporting on how those conditions related to postoperative outcomes - the most common mental health condition was depression, with a 19% prevalence (95% CI 14%-25%), followed by binge eating disorder (17% prevalence, 95% CI 13%-21%), reported Aaron Dawes, MD , of the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California Los Angeles, and colleagues. However, there was conflicting evidence for an association between preoperative mental health conditions and weight loss after the surgery, they wrote in the Journal of the American Medical Association. "Though no one should be prescribing bariatric surgery to treat depression, the findings help physicians better understand candidates for surgery and mental health factors to consider when treating these patients," Dawes wrote in an email to Med Page Today. In 11 of 12 studies looking at depression, the condition improved after bariatric surgery. Diagnosis of mental health conditions was done prior to surgery in all of the studies. The most commonly studied conditions was depression (analyzed in 34 studies), followed by binge eating disorder (25 studies) and anxiety (22 studies). Only depression and binge eating disorders were higher in the patient population than in the general U. Population (8% for depression, and 1%-5% for binge eating disorder), according to the authors. "The quality of evidence was very low for all associations between preoperative mental health conditions and postoperative weight loss," the authors wrote, adding that depression was the exception, where the evidence was categorized as 'low.' Richard Stahl, MD , of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, pointed out that the finding that bariatric patients had a greater prevalence for depression and binge eating versus the general population also was important. Guidelines from the American Society of Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery and from the Department of Veterans Affairs recommend assessment of patients' mental health conditions. more...



Antidepressants : Get tips to cope with side effects

Antidepressants can cause unpleasant side effects. In some cases, however, antidepressants cause side effects that don't go away. Talk to your doctor or mental health provider about any side effects you're having. Rarely, antidepressants can cause serious side effects that need to be treated right away. If side effects seem intolerable, you may be tempted to stop taking an antidepressant or to reduce your dose on your own. Your symptoms may return, and stopping your antidepressant suddenly may cause withdrawal-like symptoms. Click on the links at left to see coping strategies for the most common antidepressant side effects. Talk to your doctor about a dosage change or a slow-release form of the medication. Talk to your doctor about switching medications, but get the pros and cons. Most antidepressants cause sexual side effects that can last throughout treatment. Talk to your doctor about adding or switching to an antidepressant that may counteract these effects, such as bupropion (Wellbutrin). Talk to your partner about your sexual side effects and how they change your needs. Take your antidepressant in the morning. Talk to your doctor about taking a sedating medication at bedtime. more...



Hayden Panettiere rocks 40 pound weight loss after

Hayden Panettiere rocks 40 pound weight loss after postpartum depression rehab. Hayden Panettiere is healthy and happy after completing a stint in rehab for postpartum depression. Hayden, who looks fantastic after her 40-pound post-baby weight loss, is glad she spoke out about her depression. Panettiere is touched by the overwhelming support she has received from family, friends and fans after announcing she was suffering from postpartum depression following the December 2014 birth of daughter Kaya Klitschko. Hayden was shocked by how accepting and understanding people were about her PPD. "The more open I was, the more acceptance I got,” she said. Hayden said her PPD was extremely debilitating. Panettiere resumed filming "Nashville" in January, and said her experience with postpartum depression helped her relate to her TV character, Juliette Barnes, who also suffers from PPD. Hayden is glad she went public with her condition. more...



Long - term weight loss maintenance

However, research has shown that ≈20% of overweight individuals are successful at long-term weight loss when defined as losing at least 10% of initial body weight and maintaining the loss for at least 1 y. The National Weight Control Registry provides information about the strategies used by successful weight loss maintainers to achieve and maintain long-term weight loss. National Weight Control Registry members have lost an average of 33 kg and maintained the loss for more than 5 y. National Weight Control Registry members provide evidence that long-term weight loss maintenance is possible and help identify the specific approaches associated with long-term success. SUCCESSFUL WEIGHT LOSS MAINTENANCE. The purpose of this paper is to review the data on the prevalence of successful weight loss maintenance and then present some of the major findings from the National Weight Control Registry (NWCR), a database of more than 4000 individuals who have indeed been successful at long-term weight loss maintenance. First, the definition requires that the weight loss be intentional. There are very few studies that have used this definition to estimate the prevalence of successful weight loss maintenance. Of these 228, 47 (20.6%) met the criteria for successful weight loss maintenance: they had intentionally lost at least 10% of their body weight and maintained it for at least 1 y. Results of random digit dial surveys indicate that ≈20% of people in the general population are successful at long-term weight loss maintenance. These data, along with findings from the National Weight Control Registry, underscore the fact that it is possible to achieve and maintain significant amounts of weight loss. more...



Best Antidepressant for Weight Loss

Best Antidepressant for Weight Loss? Question: What is the best antidepressant for weight loss? You don't want to sacrifice your physical health for your mental health, but what can you do? The first thing to be aware of is that it's not your fault that you are gaining weight. The good news is that certain antidepressants can actually cause a small amount of weight loss .   There are also others which, while they don't cause weight loss, don't tend to cause you to gain either, which can be helpful when you are attempting to take those excess pounds back off through diet and exercise. The first thing you want to do before starting a diet and exercise program is to see your doctor for a checkup. The best antidepressant for weight loss, however, may be bupropion (Wellbutrin). Food and Drug Administration gave its approval for a new prescription weight loss drug called Contrave, which combines bupropion with an anti-addiction drug called naltrexone. Your doctor can provide you with more information about whether it may be right for you. more...



Depression Symptoms - Mayo Clinic

During these episodes, symptoms occur most of the day, nearly every day and may include: Depression symptoms in children and teens. Common signs and symptoms of depression in children and teenagers are similar to those of adults, but there can be some differences. In younger children, symptoms of depression may include sadness, irritability, clinginess, worry, aches and pains, refusing to go to school, or being underweight. Depression symptoms in older adults. Depression is not a normal part of growing older, and it should never be taken lightly. Unfortunately, depression often goes undiagnosed and untreated in older adults, and they may feel reluctant to seek help. Unipolar depression in adults: Assessment and diagnosis. Bipolar and related disorders. FYI: Understanding depression and effective treatment. Systematic review and economic modelling of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of art therapy among people with non-psychotic mental health disorders. more...



Nutrition and Diabetes - The effects of weight

The effects of weight loss after bariatric surgery on health-related quality of life and depression. 1 Department of Surgery, Weill Cornell College of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. 2 Obesity and Quality of Life Consulting, and Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA. 4 Department of Surgery, Mt Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. Correspondence: Dr GW Strain, Department of Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, 525 E 68th Street, New York, NY 10065, USA. In severe obesity, impairments in health-related quality of life (HRQo L) and dysphoric mood are reported. A total of 105 consented patients completed the Short-Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36), the Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Lite (IWQOL-Lite) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) before and 25 months after surgery. more...



Losing Weight Could Make You Depressed, Study Says

To investigate the effects of weight loss on both physical and mental health. Though the study doesn’t prove that dieting causes depression, it does show that weight loss doesn’t necessarily improve mental health, as many people assume. People should be realistic about weight loss and be prepared for the challenges.” But Jackson points out that this negative effect on mental health could be more a function of the stress of dieting, rather than a consequence of the actual weight loss. “However, mood may improve once target weight is reached and the focus is on weight maintenance. more...



Meditation - Depression - Weight Loss

Meditation is a proven stress-reliever, but it can also remedy those struggling with depression, weight loss and marital problems. Meditation for Depression: Meditation can help quiet those thoughts, says psychologist Mark Williams, coauthor of The Mindful Way Through Depression. It teaches the mind to experience emotions without judging them, and people who are vulnerable to depression learn to avoid falling into whirlpools of counterproductive thinking. If there are no courses in your area, you can follow the program in The Mindful Way Through Depression. More Ways to Beat Depression. more...



Depression After the Death of a Loved One

Losing a loved one can trigger intense feelings of grief. For some people, this grief can lead to depression or make underlying depression worse. Whether you experience depression or grief, there are many approaches that can help you heal with time. Grief is a normal, expected set of emotions that can occur after the loss of a loved one. Complicated grief is somewhere between grief and depression. Difficulty accepting that your loved one is gone. Seek mental health counseling if you think you’re experiencing complicated grief after the death of a loved one. Seeking out a support group for those who have experienced the loss of a loved one. When you come to an important date related to your loved one, such as an anniversary or birthday, you don’t have to pretend the date isn’t significant to you. Celebrate your loved one’s memory or spend time with loved ones that can help you feel better. The loss of a loved one is life-changing and can leave a profound hole in your life. Feeling as if your life isn’t worth living if you don’t have your loved one. Seeking help and support can help you feel better. With time, you can find healing that will help you move forward with life while also celebrating your loved one’s memory. more...



Does Losing Weight Lead to Depression? - Women's Health

You might think that dropping pounds and getting healthier would go hand-in-hand with becoming happier—but a new study turns this assumption on its head: Believe it or not, losing weight might actually put you at a higher risk for depression—at least, that's according to a new study from the online journal PLOS ONE . And while this isn’t the first study  to make a connection between weight loss and depression, it’s important to dig a bit deeper into these findings before you decide to ditch your weight-loss plans altogether. For the study, researchers looked at almost 2,000 overweight and obese adults and found that those who slimmed down were 80 percent more likely to be depressed—and even after controlling for major life factors such as losing a loved one, those who lost weight were still more likely to be depressed than the people who didn't drop a pound. For starters, says Glassman, this study doesn’t take into account how people were losing weight—it only looks at the fact that they lost it. Lastly, the study might not have gone on long enough for the people who were losing weight to be happy with the amount they lost—an idea that the study authors also noted. “The people who lost weight might have been successful at losing it but became negative because they were doing it wrong,” she says. “The results of this study aren't a reason to not try to lose weight, but they show that we do need to better understand the implications of weight loss on your psychological wellbeing.” The bottom line: It's still uncertain if there's a strong connection between losing weight and becoming depressed and, if so, why that relationship may exist. Using this tactic may not provide the fastest results, but you'll certainly be more upbeat along the way—and probably find that the pounds you drop are more likely to stay off for good. more...



Grief and Depression Coping With Denial, Loss, Anger and More

When you lose someone or something dear to you, it's natural to feel pain and grief . The grief process is normal, and most people go through it. The grieving process is an opportunity to appropriately mourn a loss and then heal. The process is helped when you acknowledge grief, find support, and allow time for grief to work. But that's not the only kind of loss that can cause grief. While we all feel grief and loss, and each of us is unique in the ways we cope with our feelings. How Do We React to Grief and Loss? People go through common stages of grief: more...



Can Weight Loss Cause Depression

The study —from University College London—looked at about 1,980 overweight or obese participants to see how their weight loss might impact their physical and mental health . People should be realistic about weight loss and be prepared for the challenges." Also, she says, depressed moods may arise due to the stress of restricting calories, not necessarily the weight loss itself. Says Jackson: "We do not want to discourage anyone from trying to lose weight, which has tremendous physical benefits, but people should not expect weight loss to instantly improve all aspects of life." more...



Weight Loss Surgery and Bipolar Disorder

A recent study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry entitled “Are Mood Disorders and Obesity Related? Children and adolescents with major depressive disorder may be at increased risk for developing obesity. Patients with bipolar disorder may have elevated rates of overweight, obesity, and abdominal obesity. Persons living with obesity who seek weight-loss treatment may have elevated rates of depressive and bipolar disorders. Abdominal obesity may be associated with depressive symptoms in females and males. We also know that a number of medications used to treat depression and bipolar disorder compound the problem by creating significant weight gain which may worsen previously existing obesity. In addition, for people with bipolar disorder and obesity, the levels of suffering layer on top of one another and exacerbate each other. Getting the surgery approved was somewhat of a struggle, though, because of concerns that people with bipolar disorder might not have good outcomes. The considerable hazards posed by obesity in BD, as measured by illness complexity and premature mortality, provide the basis for hypothesizing that bariatric surgery may prevent and improve morbidity in this patient population. But it seems that it may be a reasonable option for those suffering with medically dangerous obesity and bipolar disorder. Plenty of questions remain to be answered, including whether the mental health of those who have the surgery is ultimately better, worse, or the same as those with bipolar and obesity who’ve elected not to have the surgery. If you have had weight loss surgery and live with depression or bipolar disorder, are you satisfied with the results? more...



Weight Loss and Adrenal Stress - Women to Women

Weight Loss and Adrenal Stress. We go through periods of time in our lives when the demands are greater and the stress load is heavier. Our adrenal glands govern our stress response, by secreting hormones relative to our stress levels. When the adrenal glands are overworked, the body prepares for disaster, by storing fat and calories. If you were being chased by a predator, your adrenal glands initiated a “fight or flight” response, releasing adrenaline and cortisol into the body. But whether we are being physically threatened or not, with any increased stress our body looks to its stored fuel, and then replenishes it when used. Also, with increased levels of cortisol, our body also does not respond as well to leptin, the hormone that makes us feel full, so we eat more. Normally when we feel begin to feel hungry, our blood sugar drops and the brain sends a message to the adrenal glands to release cortisol. When we have longterm stress, both insulin and cortisol remain elevated in the blood, and the extra glucose is stored as fat–mostly in the abdomen. Scientists have discovered that fat cells actually have special receptors for the stress hormone cortisol, and there are more of these receptors in our abdominal fat cells than anywhere else in our bodies! more...



Bereavement - Related Depression - Psychiatric Times

Grief is the psychological and emotional reaction to a significant loss, not limited to death. Zisook and Shuchter14 report that a personal history of major depression, a family history of major depression, and alcohol consumption in the first 2 months after the loss are associated with depression secondary to bereavement. Our group has primarily focused on the psychopharmacological treatment of bereavement-related major depression, but it is helpful to say a few words about psychotherapy for bereavement and grief. Three comprehensive reviews provide important insight into the effectiveness of therapy and counseling for bereavement and grief. In these trials, patients with BRD have generally shown improvement in both depressive and grief symptoms, although the improvement in symptoms of grief is often less than that seen with depression. In a double-blind trial of both nortriptyline and sertraline, results were pooled for the 2 medications.26 The investigators found that depression ratings improved by 57% for the sample; they did not measure grief independently. Depression was not targeted in this study, and the investigators found no evidence that diazepam affected the course of bereavement. In the study, 22 men and 58 women, most of whom were in their 60s, were randomized to 16 weeks of treatment with 1 of 4 treatments. Reports of treatment for complicated grief have included both medication and psychotherapy. In the paroxetine plus psychotherapy group, scores on the Inventory of Complicated Grief (ICG) scale fell by 53% and depression scores on the HAM-D fell by 54%. In a case series, 4 women with a primary diagnosis of complicated grief were treated with escitalopram for 10 weeks.30 Three of the 4 women also had PTSD, all had a history of depression, and 2 were currently depressed. Mean ratings of complicated grief on the ICG fell by 76%, and scores on the HAM-D decreased by 75%. Results of the trial showed that CGT outperformed IPT in treating complicated grief, with response rates of 51% and 28%, respectively (P = .02). CGT is the best supported treatment for complicated grief. Prevalence of depression and its treatment in an elderly population: the Cache County study. more...



Major Depression and Complicated Grief

It’s important to know about normal grief responses so that you can know if the bereaved person might be getting worse—going into a major depression. Intense guilt over things done or not done at the time of the loved one’s death. Continued disbelief in the death of the loved one, or emotional numbness over the loss. Being unable to accept the death. Feeling preoccupied with the loved one or how they died. Being unable to enjoy good memories about the loved one. Blaming oneself for the death. Wishing to die to be with the loved one. Continuous yearning and longing for the deceased. Trouble pursuing interests or planning for the future after the death of the loved one. Feeling that life is meaningless or empty without the loved one. Loss of identity or purpose in life, feeling like part of themselves died with the loved one. If you or anyone close to the deceased has any of the above symptoms of major depression or complicated grief, talk with a qualified health or mental health professional. more...



Does Depression Cause Weight Gain or Weight Loss

And how can you untangle the link between depression and weight - especially if depression has sapped you of your energy to make changes? Depression and Weight Gain. A March 2010 review of 15 studies, published in the Archives of General Psychiatry, linked obesity to a greater risk of developing depression - and vice versa. But do people gain weight because they are depressed? In 2009, researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham reported that depressed people tend to gain weight faster than people who aren't depressed. “That leads to deeper depression, and more eating, and greater amounts of weight gain. more...



Weight loss treatments - Evidence

You are most likely to be successful in losing weight and keeping it off when you believe that your body weight can be controlled. This article discusses how to get started with a weight loss plan, including changes in your behavior, what you eat, and weight loss medications. (See "Patient information: Weight loss surgery and procedures (Beyond the Basics)" .) The BMI is calculated from your height and weight ( calculator 1 and calculator 2 ). Eating — You can change your eating habits by breaking the chain of events between the trigger for eating and eating itself. — You can estimate the number of calories you need per day based upon your current (or target) weight, gender, and activity level for women and for men [ 4 ]. Any diet will help you to lose weight if you stick with the diet. Weight loss medicines may be recommended for people who have not been able to lose weight with diet and exercise who have a: If you do not lose at least 5 percent of your initial body weight within 12 weeks, the medicine should be stopped. Liraglutide — Liraglutide at 3.0 mg/day is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for weight loss. ●Chitosan and wheat dextrin are ineffective for weight loss and their use is not recommended. Bariatric (stomach) procedures for weight loss are discussed separately (see "Patient information: Weight loss surgery and procedures (Beyond the Basics)" ). more...



Depression Before Surgery Does not Interfere with Weight

ORLANDO, FL – June 15, 2011 – Depression and anxiety do not seem to interfere with the amount of weight loss or the improvement of obesity-related conditions after bariatric surgery, according to a new study* of more than 25,000 patients presented here at the 28th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS). Among patients with depression, use of antidepressant medication dropped by about 20 percent (72% to 60%) one year after surgery and remained at that level after three years of follow-up. Finks, MD, Assistant Professor of Surgery at the University of Michigan, and lead study author. University of Michigan researchers examined data from 25,469 patients across 29 hospitals in the Michigan Bariatric Surgery Collaborative (MBSC), a consortium of the state’s hospitals and surgeons that maintains a prospective registry of bariatric surgery patients. Between 2006 and 2010, researchers found 11,687 bariatric patients (46%) were being treated for at least one psychiatric disorder, with depression (41%) and anxiety (15%) among the most common. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be the most effective and long lasting treatment for morbid obesity and many related conditions.1 People with morbid obesity have BMI of 40 or more, or BMI of 35 or more with an obesity-related disease such as Type 2 diabetes, heart disease or sleep apnea. The most common methods of bariatric surgery are laparoscopic gastric bypass and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB). The risk of death from bariatric surgery is about 0.1 percent5 and the overall likelihood of major complications is about 4 percent.6. It is a non-profit organization that works to advance the art and science of bariatric surgery and is committed to educating medical professionals and the lay public about bariatric surgery as an option for the treatment of morbid obesity, as well as the associated risks and benefits. Bariatric Surgery Utilization and Outcomes in 1998 and 2004. more...



Depressed After Experiencing a Loss

The loss of a loved one is one of the most difficult experiences you’ll ever have – but healthy grieving can help you get through it. But for many people, the most profound loss is the death of a loved one. In fact, 1 in 5 people develop major depression after the loss of a loved one, according to the American Cancer Society. And when grieving becomes too intense, it can develop into “complicated grief,” in which debilitating feelings don’t improve, according to the Mayo Clinic. Getting through the grieving process can be tough, but it’s an important part of coping after you experience a loss. You may feel guilty about your relationship with the person who’s gone or angry at them for dying. “Grief catches you in the most unexpected moments. Spend time with the most compassionate people in your life – those who’ll be willing to listen to you, Wasserman says. Remember that grief is a process, and you might go through many different emotions – for example, you could feel anger, then denial, acceptance, then anger again, Wasserman says. For some people, grief over the loss of a loved one turns into serious depression. You know that grief has morphed into major depression when symptoms don’t diminish over time, the researchers found. About 10% of those grieving the loss of a loved one experience complicated grief. Symptoms include feelings of numbness or detachment, anger, deep yearning for the lost loved one, or a sense that that person is always present and watching over you, according to the Mayo Clinic. The condition can be treated with antidepressant medication and a specific psychotherapy called complicated grief treatment (CGT). It includes exercises to help you come to terms with the loss by repeatedly revisiting the time of death. more...



Depression Symptoms Improve after

The declines in cravings were both clinically and statistically significant (−83%, EFT has been successfully utilized in the treatment of depression across a wide range of populations and delivery methods. A final group of 120 participants were offered a place, and 24 withdrew for personal reasons, leaving 96 to be randomized into the EFT treatment or waitlist condition. The waitlist condition waited without treatment for the length of the four-week trial and then completed the EFT treatment condition. The EFT treatment was offered in groups of 15 participants and was conducted by a practitioner certified in EFT. There were no significant differences between the EFT and WL conditions in baseline sociodemographic characteristics ( Church and A. Brooks, “The effect of a brief EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques) self-intervention on anxiety, depression, pain and cravings in healthcare workers,” Integrative Medicine: A Clinician’s Journal, vol. Brooks, “The effect of EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques) on psychological symptoms in addiction treatment: a pilot study,” Journal of Scientific Research and Reports, vol. Church and N. Rowe, “The effects of EFT on long-term psychological symptoms,” Counseling and Clinical Psychology Journal, vol. Brooks, “The effect of Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) on stress biochemistry: a randomized controlled trial,” Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, vol. more...



JAMA Network - JAMA Internal Medicine - Depression in

Paired preoperative and 1-year postoperative scores (n = 262) were used to identify predictors of change in BDI score. Higher scores, indicating increased symptoms of depression, were found in younger subjects, women, and those with poorer body image. Weight loss was associated with a significant and sustained fall in BDI scores, with a mean ± SD score of 7.8 ± 6.5 at 1 year and 9.6 ± 7.7 at 4 years after surgery. Greater falls in BDI score at 1 year were seen in women, younger subjects, and those with greater excess weight loss (combined r2 = 0.10; P. more...



Weight Loss

However, occasionally, the first symptom to develop in some serious diseases is weight loss. Some people may see a doctor to say that they have lost weight and don't know why. However, occasionally, weight loss is the first symptom noticed. So, weight loss is sometimes the first thing reported to a doctor. Weight loss may develop due to not eating much. It may be friends or family who actually notice that the person has lost weight. Family and friends may show concern about weight loss and not be aware that the person has an alcohol problem. But, occasionally, the first symptom that is noticed with infections such as tuberculosis or HIV is weight loss. However, weight loss may be the first symptom noticed. Again, it is sometimes friends or family who may first notice that a person is not right and has lost weight and it then turns out to be the early stages of dementia. See individual leaflets on the various diseases that can cause weight loss. more...



Happiness Isn’t Guaranteed After Weight Loss

But a new paper in PLOS ONE found the opposite: People’s rates of depression actually may creep up after weight loss. In a study of 1,979 overweight and obese adults in the UK, people who lost 5% or more of their initial body weight over four years showed significant changes in markers of physical health, but were more likely to report depressed mood than those who stayed within 5% of their original weight. Of the 1,979 overweight and obese participants, 278 (14%) lost at least 5% of their initial body weight with a mean weight loss of 6.8kg per person. Before adjusting for serious health issues and major life events such as bereavement, which can cause both weight loss and depressed mood, the people who lost weight were 78% more likely to report depressed mood. The researchers, led by Sarah Jackson of the University College London, say that unhappiness after weight loss could be explained by a few factors. People should be realistic about weight loss and be prepared for the challenges.” More evidence that happiness is found in low expectations . more...



Can depression cause hair loss? - Hair Loss

Hair Loss. Can depression cause hair loss? Stress of any kind can play a role in hair loss. During this resting phase, more hairs than usual fall out, and our hair looks thinner. This process is called "telogen effluvium." It can be brought on quicker by stress, starting earlier and lasting longer in the natural cycle of hair growth and rest. These factors can also cause hair thinning: If your hair is thinning after clinical depression, ask your doctor if any of your medications could be causing it. But taking good care of your body and keeping up a healthy and hopeful attitude can help. more...



Obesity Action Coalition Obesity and Depression

Stop and think about all the possibilities for depression to accompany obesity. Younger patients, women and those with greater excess body weight loss after surgery had the greatest improvement on their BDIscores. In a study of depression in our own bariatric surgical population at Scottsdale Bariatric Center, approximately 2,005 consecutive patients were evaluated for depression before and after surgery, as well as post-surgical weight loss. Exercise – There is no doubt that regular physical exercise and activity is the cheapest and most efficient way to control your mood. Get rid of anger – Remember, an old definition of depression is “anger turned inward.” Unresolved resentment can damage both your relationships and health. Chronic anger and hostility can be your worst enemies. Keep a positive attitude – There is an entire field called “positive psychology,” which has grown from research that indicates the people with positive attitudes fight disease better and live healthier lives. Don’t take yourself too seriously – This is a tip that I’ve learned both from my own life and many of my patients. Seeing the silly parts of life may give you a fresh point of view and change your mood. The keys to motivation are to not get overwhelmed with a goal that is too big or unrealistic, and to write things down to keep track of progress. Remember, treating your obesity has a major emotional impact, and your life will change. Many of our patients have found that they can reduce or eliminate these medications after they see changes in their weight and quality of life. Engstrom is an active member of the American Society for Bariatric Surgery and is a specialist in applying mindfulness techniques to long-term weight management. more...



The Other Side of Weight Loss No One Talks About : 'You

WH: What do you think occurred after your weight loss that led to your depression? And then when you're done, it feels like, "Well, what now?" Losing weight was my life for about 17 months, and I didn't know what to do [without that goal in my life.] I had to set another goal, but I had no idea what that would be. Losing weight was something I did for such a long time that it felt like I lost a friend. There's a delicate balance there that you have to figure out. There is a little bit of guilt because I think, "This is what got me [to my previous weight] in the first place." But when [these indulgences] are so sporadic, you have to train yourself to learn that this one meal won't make you gain five pounds. There's a part to weight loss that people don't tell you about: It's that you aren't going to look like a supermodel afterward. You may have skin issues that you wouldn't really think about. WH: What do you mean by that exactly? WH: How do you cope with hurtful comments like that? WH: Is there anything else that you're insecure about? It's really just the skin that hangs around that you can't really do much with. It would've been really helpful to know [before losing weight] that I wasn't going to look exactly the way that I wanted to. But if I think about how I felt back then, I realize I don't want to feel like that again, and I know what I have to do to not go back there. more...



Depression after Gastric Bypass Surgery - Psychology Today

But for some, as the pounds disappear, the problems begin. However, some problems don’t disappear as quickly as the weight, and for some, may persist for years. Anxiety, depression and insomnia may be so severe and resistant to medication that some patients consider having the operation reversed. And anxiety after the stomach reduction is also understandable. But the depressions reported both in the scientific literature, and in the hundreds of personal anecdotes on gastric surgery blog sites, suggests otherwise. Some have associated depression with the very low-calorie diet followed for several months following the surgery. For some, however, a clinical depression lasts well beyond the first months of very restricted feeding and is resistant to antidepressant therapy . The absence of carbohydrate in the diet invariably alters serotonin levels and that neurotransmitter activity. It is the insulin release after carbohydrates are eaten that indirectly allows more serotonin in the brain to be made. Insulin changes the levels of amino acids in the blood and this enables one amino acid, tryptophan, to enter the brain. Dietary regimens before and after bariatric surgery often create the perfect storm for serotonin depletion. The stomach is so small, there is not room for both carbohydrate and protein and the latter must be eaten. Insomnia is also an unexpected side effect of the surgery. According to some of their reports, the insomnia lasts for months and even years. more...



Weight Loss : Check Your Symptoms and Signs

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Weight Loss and Depression : Hand In Hand

Weight Loss And Depression: Hand In Hand. When this feeling happens over and over again, it can lead to problems with depression. When this is the cause, though, the symptoms of depression such as problems socializing and a negative take on life can be lessened when an individual loses some weight. This up and down weight loss can actually lead to more serious depression. The doctor can help with the weight loss by having the patient work with a dietician. A dietician can provide tools such as education and weight loss plans to help the individual to be more successful in their weight loss efforts. When the depression improves, weight loss can be more successful as well. Because weight loss and depression are so linked, it can be nearly impossible for an individual to fight off the problems on their own. Seeking help can often be the best way to work through depression and weight loss issues. more...



Association of Postpartum Depression With Weight Retention

To examine the extent to which early postpartum depression is associated with weight retention 1 year after childbirth. We assessed associations of antenatal and postpartum depression with risk of substantial weight retention (at least 5 kg) 1 year after childbirth. New-onset postpartum depression was associated with substantial weight retention in the first postpartum year. Few studies have examined the association of psychosocial factors, particularly depression, with weight retention and obesity postpartum. Although our primary aim was to examine the association of postpartum depression with substantial postpartum weight retention, we were also interested in the interactive and independent effects of depression before and during pregnancy. We used multivariate logistic regression to examine the extent to which antenatal and postpartum depression were each independently associated with substantial postpartum weight retention. *P = 0.003 for the comparison between postpartum depression only and no antenatal or postpartum depression, via χ2-test. Associations of antenatal and postpartum depression with weight retention of at least 5 kg at 1 year postpartum. In this prospective study, we found that new-onset depression in the early postpartum period was associated with more than a twofold increased risk of substantial weight retention at the end of the first postpartum year after adjustment for weight-related covariates, maternal sociodemographics, and parity. Our study extends such research to women after childbirth and suggests that depression in the postpartum period may be a barrier to returning to prepregnancy weight. Although women with new-onset postpartum depression in our study had slightly higher prepregnancy BMI and gestational weight gain than those without depression, accounting for pregravid weight and weight gain only slightly attenuated the observed association between postpartum depression and weight retention. At least two mechanisms are hypothesized to explain the relationship between postpartum depression and weight retention. The lack of an association between antenatal depression and substantial postpartum weight retention was somewhat unexpected and deserves additional exploration. Depression and weight gain: the serotonin connection. more...



Unintentional weight loss - NHS Choices

Unintentional weight loss  Significant weight loss can also be the result of an  eating disorder , such as anorexia  or bulimia . If your weight loss wasn't due to the above causes, and you didn't lose weight through dieting or exercising, see your GP, as you may have an illness that needs treating. The following information may give you a better idea of the cause of your weight loss, but don't use it to diagnose yourself. Other common causes of unexpected weight loss. Less common causes of unexpected weight loss. Less frequently, unexpected weight loss may be the result of: more...



Does Treating Depression Help With Weight Loss

Does Treating Depression Help With Weight Loss? Depression is associated with increased risk for obesity and worse weight loss treatment outcomes. Now a team of investigators [1] from the University of Massachusetts Medical School have tested the hypothesis that delivering evidence-based behavioral therapy for depression before a lifestyle weight loss intervention should improve both weight loss and depression. Follow-up occurred at 6 and 12 months, with the main outcome measures being weight loss and depression symptoms. The investigators found that adding behavioral therapy to a lifestyle intervention resulted in greater depression remission but did not improve weight loss at 1 year. Across both groups, they did note that improvement in depression was associated with greater weight loss. more...



Depression - Palmyra Surgical Bariatric Program

Depression after weight loss surgery may occur for several reasons. Some people who experienced depression before their procedure find that the surgery itself does not make it go away, while others become depressed due to the significant changes that result from and are required after weight loss surgery. After weight loss surgery, your body, lifestyle, and interactions with others will be going through major changes. Here are some feelings you may experience after surgery that can lead to depression: You may find that your expectations of weight loss surgery were unrealistic. If you feel a sense of disappointment after surgery, ask yourself what you expected of it in the first place; some people view weight loss surgery as a “cure all.” If you determine that your expectations may have been too high, focus on the things that have visibly improved since your surgery. Always keep in mind that ultimately, you’re doing this for your own health, and the people around you are likely to be supportive of your improvement. You made the wise and brave decision to get healthier, and weight loss surgery has been proven to be the most effective way to achieve that end. No matter who you turn to, don’t forget that reaching out for help when you need it is all part of the weight loss process. more...



Depression after Bariatric Surgery

Those who don’t understand bariatric surgery however may not realize that the lifestyle changes that are necessary after bariatric surgery are strict and difficult. Also, many don’t understand the difficulties that post bariatric patients have in adjusting their new lifestyle and maintain their new lower weight – maintenance is a challenge in and of itself. Depression, even in its mildest forms, can interfere with the patient’s daily life after surgery. They can do so in much the same way as they deal with other issues after their procedure – excellent support and asking for help. When addressed immediately, depression and other psychological issues after surgery can be warded off before they become severe. more...




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